Politics

Joseph Gruber

Millennials will oust Baby Boomers as the largest voting bloc as early as 2020. Dave Andersen, assistant professor of political science at Iowa State University, joins host Ben Kieffer in this River to River segment to discuss how Millennial voters may change politics in the decades to come.

“They are going to shift the focus of how we talk about government,” Andersen says. “Millennials seem to want lower taxes, more government. They are really in favor of smart government that is more efficient. We haven’t really talked about that yet as a country.”

NASA/Aubrey Gemignani

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with presidential historian Tim Walch and political scientist Rachel Caufield to mark one year of Trump in office.  They examine how he has defied convention when compared with other modern presidents.

They examine themes including: accomplishments and public approval at the one year mark, how presidents deal with criticism, their relationship to their cabinets, and how they have justified and spoken of the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

Politics Day: Shutdowns and S---holes

Jan 18, 2018
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A government shutdown looms at the end of this week, and continued debate over a word that President Trump said or did not say. On this politics day edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with Dave Anderson, assistant professor of political science at Iowa State University and Hans Hassell, assistant professor of political science at Cornell College.

Politics Day: Oprah for President?

Jan 16, 2018
Bill Ebbesen/Wikimedia Commons

In this new year, President Donald Trump has urged protesters to overthrow the Iranian government, threatened to blow up North Korea, and called for cuts to aid to the Palestinians.  On this River to River program, political scientists Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Jim McCormick of Iowa State University discuss Trump’s radical departure from traditional U.S. diplomacy.

Also, Oprah for president? 

McCormick says, "I kind of doubt it."

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The Islamic State's territory in Syria and Iraq has been reduced to a small fraction of what it was when ISIS declared its Caliphate back in 2014. But is the Islamic State really defeated?

On this River to River program, join host Ben Kieffer as he spends the hour with with former Air Force intelligence analyst Evan Renfro, an assistant professor of political science at University of Northern Iowa. Renfro gives his perspective on the threat from ISIS and other violent extremist groups.

U.S. Pacific Fleet

Both the U.S. and China have accused the other of militarizing the South China Sea—China has been creating islands to back its territorial claims, and the U.S. has sent military ships and planes near the disputed islands.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with political scientist Sara Mitchell of the University of Iowa about various maritime disputes. She has reviewed patterns of maritime conflicts going back to the early 1900s.

Tax Plan a Legislative Victory for Trump

Dec 20, 2017
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Today, both houses of Congress passed a tax overhaul, and the Republicans' first major legislative victory is expected to be signed by President Trump. On this River to River, political analysts Wayne Moyer of Grinnell College and Tim Hagle of the University of Iowa walk through the political implications of the bill.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

The president and CEO of the conservative advocacy group The Family Leader says Americans have a right to know if President Trump engaged in past sexual misconduct. Bob Vander Plaats says the allegations made by a number of women against the president should not be ignored simply because he says he’s innocent.

"A lot of these ladies came forth in the election, and for whatever reason, the American people said 'we're going to give the presidency to Donald Trump.' That doesn't mean their issue went away because he became president." 

Amos Ben Gershom GPO

Today, President Trump announces his formal recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

On this edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer asks political analysts about the president reversing nearly seven decades of resisting such policy.  Joining the conversation: Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University.

They also talk about the tax overhaul, the possibility of a government shutdown, and the accusations of sexual harassment and assault involving several national politicians.

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President Trump is rapidly reshaping the judiciary. On this River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with guests about how Republicans are systematically filling vacancies in the federal court system with young, conservative judges.

Joining the conversation is former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Iowa Kevin Techau and Todd Pettys of the University of Iowa College of Law. 

Sexual Assault and Harassment in Politics

Nov 30, 2017
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Should taxpayer-funded settlements involving sexual harassment allegations against members of Congress be made public? On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political scientists Rachel Caulfield of Drake University and Tracy Osborn of the University of Iowa.

Osborn says what's happening now is an indication of new attitudes.

"It shows a cultural change," Osborn says.

Gage Skidmore

President Trump returns from Asia to political turmoil. 

On this edition of River to River, political analysts Steffen Schmidt of Iowa State University and Scott Peters of the University of Iowa discuss: Republican efforts to stay focused on a tax overhaul; the House and Senate visions for tax reform and the latest effort as part of it to repeal the health insurance mandate; Jeff Sessions' testimony on Russia meetings; and the Justice Department weighing a Clinton investigation. 

monica vernon
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Monica Vernon and Brad Hart will face each other in a runoff election for Cedar Rapids mayor next month.

None of the eight candidates got more than 50 percent of the vote Tuesday, which is required to win.

Vernon, a businesswoman and former city council member, led the field with 30 percent of the vote. She says giving out her phone number and having conversations with Cedar Rapids residents has been central to her campaign.

Clay Masters / IPR

A terror attack in New York, new revelations about the Trump campaign's possible collusion with Russian officials, and a stalled plan for tax reform are all covered on this edition of Politics Day on River to River

Host Ben Kieffer talks with Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield Professor of Political Science at Grinnell College, and Tim Hagle, University of Iowa Associate Professor of Political Science. 

Hagle says that even though George Papadopoulos may have been an unimportant figure in the Trump campaign, his guilty plea does not look good for the Trump campaign. 

kim reynolds
John Pemble/IPR

Governor Kim Reynolds has been in office for five months.  In the first half of this River to River program, host Ben Kieffer asks Reynolds about health care, opioid abuse, partisan politics, and the upcoming legislative session.

To start, Reynolds says she had a number of topics to offer Iowa's congressional delegation. 

She says that she thanked them for support of the Renewable Fuel Standard, and work on healthcare.  Her priorities for next legislative session are getting a water quality bill and having a competitive bushiness environment.

courtesy Iowans for Sam Clovis

Updated Nov. 2--U.S. Department of Agriculture nominee Sam Clovis of Iowa withdrew from consideration to be the agency's top scientist amid questions about his connection to the Russia probe. 

Clovis sent a letter to President Trump asking for his name to be withdrawn. 

John Pemble/IPR

Iowa's U.S. Senator Joni Ernst says she’s hopeful lawmakers will pass legislation she says will help people facing steep premium increases for individual health insurance policies under the Affordable Care Act.

About 72-thousand people in Iowa face increases of nearly 60% after the state withdrew its proposal for a stopgap plan that would have provided relief. In this interview with River to River host Ben Kieffer, Ernst says the current situation puts a lot of Iowans in a bind.

Joyce Russell/IPR

A plan that officials had hoped would keep health insurance affordable for thousands of Iowans has been withdrawn, clearing the way for premiums to more than double.    

Governor Reynolds' administration had been urging the federal government to approve its so-called stopgap plan.  

The plan would have restructured benefits for Iowans getting individual insurance under the Affordable Care Act in order to draw in more young healthy people to keep premiums down.  

A 'Zig-Zag' Edition of Politics Day

Oct 20, 2017
Ben Terrett

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says it is difficult to govern with what he calls a president "zigging and zagging" on his support of bipartisan efforts to make changes to the Affordable Care Act. In this politics Wednesday edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by professor of political science at Iowa State University, Jim McCormick.

Image courtesy of Witching Hour Festival

Iowa City native Dan Perkins, aka Tom Tomorrow, is the creator of This Modern World, a weekly political and satirical cartoon which has been a mainstay of the alternative press for more than two and a half decades. He says that the country's tense political environment lately has been challenging in many ways, and the speed at which news is made is particularly difficult. 

Stephen Melkisethian

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments testing whether extreme partisan gerrymandering is unconstitutional. It’s a case that could radically reorder our politics.

On this politics day edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer asks political scientists Rachel Caufield of Drake University and Dave Andersen of Iowa State University to discuss the High Court’s new session.

They also discuss the political response to the Las Vegas shooting.

What Does Patriotism Mean?

Oct 3, 2017
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There has been controversy about what it means to respect or disrespect the American flag and the country itself. What does it mean to be patriotic in 2017, and how have our ideas about patriotism changed over time? During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with historian and former Herbert Hoover Library and Museum Director Tim Walch. 

At the end of the program Walch sums up one aspect: that we are able to have such a discussion at all.

The NFL and Politics

Sep 28, 2017
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When President Trump feuds with superstar athletes, what does the reaction reveal about our country’s deep political divisions? On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer is joined by political analysts Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Donna Hoffman of the University of Northern Iowa.

In light of NFL players protesting during the playing of the national anthem, Goldford says that there is a complicated relationship with free speech.

This hour of River to River was recorded before a live audience at the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple in Cedar Rapids. 

Columnists Lynda Waddington and Todd Dorman, as well as political reporter James Lynch and Erin Jordan of The Gazette, join host Ben Kieffer to discuss President Trump and the leader of North Korea, the Republican’s latest bill to overhaul Obamacare, and the value of town hall meetings in 2017. 

Casey Reyner

This show originally aired on April 26, 2017.

On this special edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer hosts a discussion on presidential power, recorded Tuesday, April 25 at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum in West Branch. 

Opinions in the audience varied, but as one participant noted: "[I] can't remember the last time we were in an auditorium talking about politics and the entire crowd didn't think just like me. We had a civil discussion with those that think differently. It can happen. There is hope."

cathy glasson
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Democrat Cathy Glasson officially announced her run for governor of Iowa Tuesday in Cedar Rapids.

Glasson says her campaign will focus on three main ideas: a $15 minimum wage, single-payer healthcare and the expansion of union rights.

"We’re fighting for an Iowa that cares about all people again, that realizes when any of us are left behind, none of us can move forward," Glasson told supporters.  

Amy Mayer/IPR file photo

Voters head to the polls across Iowa Tuesday to elect local school boards and many candidates are running for office for the first time. 

Last spring, the Ready to Run campaign training program sponsored by the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Woman and Politics at Iowa State University attracted 172 people, more than double the next-highest enrollment. Iowa State political science professor Dianne Bystrom says some of them will be on local school board ballots.

Rawbert|K|Photo

Heated conversations—especially political ones can be unsatisfying and emotionally draining.  In this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with the co-facilitators of a "difficult conversations" workshop organized by the University of Iowa School of Social Work.  Guests are Alison Oliver and Jefri Pallermo from the University of Iowa, and North Liberty based consultant, coach, and speaker Heather Woody joins in for advice for workplace conversations.

joni ernst
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Senator Joni Ernst voted against a measure Thursday that lumped federal aid for hurricane victims with budget and debt ceiling extensions.

President Donald Trump made a deal to that effect Wednesday with Democratic leaders. It pairs about $15 billion in disaster aid with an agreement to keep the government until Dec. 8.

In a call with reporters Thursday, Ernst said combining those issues into one bill is "a bad way of doing business." 

In this edition of "Pints and Politics" on River to River host Ben Kieffer, and co-host Erin Jordan gather the thoughts and opinions of reporter James Lynch and columnists Todd Dorman and Lynda Waddington from the Cedar Rapids Gazette, while hoisting a pint or two with a live audience. Topics include the Trump administration's response to Hurricane Harvey and violence in Charlottesville as well as Governor Kim Reynolds' deal with Apple and the state of the Iowa gubernatorial race. The conversation takes place at the Cedar Ridge winery and distillery in Swisher.

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