Politics

Emily Woodbury

Just as the founding fathers gathered in taverns to enjoy lively political conversation over a local brew, so do columnists and reporters from The Gazette and Iowa Public Radio.

On this edition of "Pints and Politics," recorded before a live audience at the Amana Millstream Brewing Company, co-hosts Ben Kieffer of River to River and Gazette investigative reporter, Erin Jordan, talk politics with columnists Lynda Waddington and Todd Dorman, as well as political reporter James Lynch of The Gazette. 

Gage Skidmore

President Donald Trump comes to Iowa today for the first time since his inauguration. He will be visiting Kirkwood Community College followed by a campaign-style rally tonight in Cedar Rapids.

In this politics day on River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts Jim McCormick, professor of political science at Iowa State University, and Bruce Nesmith, Joan and Abbot Lipsky professor of political science at Coe College. 

Office of Sen. Joni Ernst

Iowa’s junior U.S. Senator is describing the mood at the Capitol as somber following the shootings at a Republican Congressional baseball practice. But Joni Ernst is hesitant to call for security to accompany each member of Congress.

Capitol police were at the ball field in Alexandria, Virginia, because of the presence of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who was shot. They have been praised for their quick action to prevent more casualties. Republican Senator Ernst says members of Congress need to be vigilant, but she’s uncertain if they need armed protection.

todd prichard
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Iowa Rep. Todd Prichard of Charles City announced Tuesday he is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor.

Prichard is a veteran and a lawyer. He says he wants to help "forgotten Iowans" by offering free community college to all Iowans, expanding access to health care and raising wages.

Prichard says he can appeal to urban and rural voters because he grew up in Davenport and now lives in a small town.

BKL / Flickr

"Constitutional crisis" is a phrase heard a great deal in the news lately. On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with presidential historian Tim Walch about what constitutes a constitutional crisis.

Walch also discusses several instances when the U.S. government threatened to break down - during the Civil War in the 1860s, the Great Depression in the 1930s and during the Watergate crisis in the 1970s.

Ben Kieffer/IPR

In this special edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer takes a tour of a new exhibit at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum that opens this weekend. Museum Director Tom Schwartz gives some insight into American Presidents as people.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

The bell signals the start of second period. A trio of young women take seats in English class, their attention quickly drifting outside the walls of the high school in Fort Morgan, Colorado, eager to talk about what they’re working toward.

“I want to become an FBI [agent],” says freshman Mariam Mohammed. “It’s my dream.”

abby finkenauer
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

A Democratic state representative says she intends to run for Congress in 2018 to represent northeast Iowa.

Abby Finkenauer of Dubuque is hoping to challenge Republican Rep. Rod Blum in the race for Iowa’s 1st Congressional District.

Finkenauer says she wants to focus on policies that support working families and raise wages in Iowa.

Gage Skidmore

On this special "Pints and Politics" edition of River to River, Iowa Public Radio's Ben Kieffer co-hosts a discussion with Gazette opinion page editor Jennifer Hemmingsen.

Thursday evening, they gathered at NewBo City Market in Cedar Rapids to talk politics with columnists Lynda Waddington and Todd Dorman, as well as political reporter James Lynch of The Gazette. They discussed President Donald Trump’s first one-hundred days, as well as the main takeaways of the 2017 Iowa legislative session.

For 10 years, Iowa State University's non-partisan campaign training program "Ready to Run" has prepared women to be first time candidates. This year, they have had record enrollment in the workshops.

Kelly Winfrey is coordinator for Research and Outreach for the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University. She says women are far less likely to run for office than males, but at recent Ready to Run workshops, they have had record numbers of women interested in running for local and county offices.

joni ernst
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Sen. Joni Ernst told constituents in Elkader Monday that health care has been the biggest topic at town hall meetings, and Congress needs to work hard on new health care legislation.

She says she is worried the one remaining statewide health insurance carrier on Iowa's individual market will be free to raise its prices or will also pull out of the state.

Ernst says there is a new plan in the works to replace the Affordable Care Act, and she hopes it is ready before open enrollment starts for 2018.

Pat Blank/IPR

The longest serving mayor in the history of Cedar Falls, Jon Crews, has died. He passed away Thursday after a bout with liver cancer over the past several months.

Crews held public office most of his adult life. He was mayor for a total of 30 years, serving three separate terms.  In an interview with IPR shortly before his retirement in 2015, he reflected on his years of public service.

John Pemble / IPR

President Donald Trump delivered his first address to a joint session of Congress Tuesday night. The change in tone was noticeable, but listeners say the president's actions will speak louder than his words.

On this edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Donna Hoffman, associate professor and chair of political science at University of Northern Iowa, and Dennis Goldford, professor and chair of political science at Drake University about Trump's speech.

Lindsey Moon / Iowa Public Radio

President Donald Trump’s first few weeks in office have been a whirlwind. The same can be said for the first few weeks of the Iowa Legislature’s 2017 session.

During this special edition of River to River, recorded before a live audience at the Mill in Iowa City, host Ben Kieffer talks with columnists Todd Dorman and Lynda Waddington of the Gazette, as well as political reporter James Lynch. 

Conversation topics include Russia's interference into the U.S. Election, the likelihood of an investigation, collective bargaining rights in Iowa and many others. 

Photo by John Pemble

Iowa's U.S. senators are back in the state this week, drawing large, sometimes raucous crowds at town hall meetings. Attendance at Sen. Charles Grassley's gathering in Hancock county was reportedly more than 100. Sen. Joni Ernst drew a similar crowd at her event in Macquoketa.

Some Iowa attendees held signs supporting the Affordable Care Act and chanted "Do your job," and "Work for us." But do such protests make a difference to elected officials?

Mobilus In Mobili / Flickr

Just weeks after leaving the White House, President Barack Obama ranks as the 12th best president overall, according to a new poll of historians conducted by C-SPAN. It's the first time Obama is eligible for the Presidential Historians Survey, which asked 91 historians to rank all 43 former presidents across 10 categories. 

Rob Dillard, Iowa Public Radio

An overflow crowd crammed the Visitors' Center at Living History Farms in Urbandale for a lively town hall meeting with 3rd District Congressman David Young. The exchanges between the Republican and audience occasionally turned heated.

Larry Koester

Russia has received a lot of attention in America recently, due to evidence of Russia meddling in the last U.S. presidential election, news of Donald Trump aides’ contact with Russian officials, and military moves including an intelligence ship spotted cruising just off the East Coast and a cruise missile test that may violate a 1987 arms treaty.

Redistricting happens after each U.S. Census. Iowa lost one congressional district in 2013 based on the results of the 2010 Census; before that, Iowa had five districts. Today, we have four. 

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with David Daley, former editor-in-chief of Salon magazine who has written about redistricting, and Tracy Osborn, an associate professor of political science and director of the Politics and Policy Program at the University of Iowa. 

Under a bill unveiled last week by Secretary of State Paul Pate, Iowa voters would be required to present identification at the voting booth. Pate says his proposal is aimed at ensuring the integrity of Iowa's elections. Democratic legislators and civil libertarians, however, have promised a fight over the issue. They raise concerns that new rules could suppress voter turnout. During this half hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Pate about his proposal. 

Quidster4040 / Wikimedia Commons

 

President Trump has signed seven executive orders and 11 presidential memos since Inauguration Day, including the order that restricts travel into the United States from seven Muslim-majority countries.

On this politics day edition of River to River, Ben Kieffer talks with University of Northern Iowa political scientists, Donna Hoffman and Scott Peters, who offer their analysis of the debate over Donald Trump’s slew of executive actions, including the contentious travel ban.

Wikimedia Commons

At 7:00 p.m. Central Standard Time, President Donald Trump will announce his nominee to fill the vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court, which has remained unfilled since Justice Antonin Scalia died last year. During this River to River interview, host Ben Kieffer talks with Todd Pettys, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School, about possible nominees. 

Andrew Malone / Flickr

Nate Silver calls Ann Selzer, president of Selzer & Co., a polling firm based in West Des Moines, “America’s Best Pollster in Politics."

All that has happened relating to the November election seems long ago, but now that the dust has settled on that surprise outcome, Selzer says many underestimated the dissatisfied mood of the electorate.

Kevin Burkett

Politics in the U.S. haven’t always been as bitterly partisan as they seem today – at least according to former Republican Congressman Jim Ross Lightfoot, who served in the U.S. House from 1985 to 1997.

“[Democratic Rep. Dave Nagle] and I tried to be the grease that was in the gears that made the thing work, and now both parties are trying to be the sand in the gears to shut it down,” he says. “We had a much more bipartisan approach to things. There was a lot more comedy and comradeship than you see there today.”

Emily Woodbury

The night before President Donald Trump's inauguration, Iowans gathered in Cedar Rapids for another round of "Pints and Politics." At the end of the show, panelists: Gazette columnists Lynda Waddington, Todd Dorman, and Gazette political reporter James Lynch, each geared up for inauguration day by reciting their own Mad Libs inauguration speeches.

(Remember Mad Libs?  It’s the word game where one player prompts others for a list of words to substitute for blanks in a story, before reading the – often comical or nonsensical – story aloud.)

Join Iowa Public Radio as NPR reporters fact check President-Elect Trump's Press Conference. This page will update as his speech is transcribed and reporters complete their fact-checking.

Live updates begin at 10 am Central Time.

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Join Iowa Public Radio as NPR reporters fact check President Obama's Farewell Address. This page will update as his speech is transcribed and reporters complete their fact-checking.

Live updates begin at 8 pm Central Time.

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United States Office of Humanities

Jim Leach served Iowa in the U.S. House of Representatives for 30 years. He is now a senior scholar at the University of Iowa after serving on faculty at Harvard and Princeton and after serving as chair at the National Endowment for the Humanities. During this River to River interview, he talks with host Ben Kieffer about his view on global challenges facing the next president.

There have been many protests in the United States recently. 

After Election Day, protests sprung up across the nation, the Black Lives Matter protests have been going on since 2013, and tensions have escalated at the Standing Rock Indian reservation in North Dakota, where protesters stand against construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline project.

This hour on River to River, Ben Kieffer hosts a discussion on protesting in America, from past to present.

Gage Skidmore

President Obama says countries across Europe, as well as the United States, are confronting populist movements based on a fear of encroaching global forces.

On this politics day edition of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with political analysts who compare the fears in Europe that led to Brexit to those here in the U.S. that propelled Donald Trump into the White House. They also discuss President-Elect Donald Trump's potential cabinet picks and what that list says about how Trump may govern. 

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