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Emily Woodbury

Long-Time Advocate and Disabled-Rights Fighter Dies

A long-time Iowa advocate and fighter for the rights of the disabled, Tom Walz, passed away this week. Walz was the director of the University of Iowa School of Social Work. He was also friend of the late Bill Sackter, and he established Wild Bill’s coffee shop on the UI campus. Sackter then became the proprietor of Wild Bill’s, allowing him to finally be independent, after having spent 44 years confined to the Fairibault MN State School for the Feeble-Minded and Epileptic. On this news buzz...

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With the 2018 Legislature now in session, stay up to date on the latest bills, activities, and news from the Iowa Statehouse here.

The Host Country

We're kicking off our third season of Studio One Underground on March 8th! We'll be joined by  the Des Moines band The Host Country, founded by singer-songwriters Ty Wistrand and Diana Weishaar. Over the years, The Host Country has expanded to a five-piece band and become well-known for their honest, heartfelt lyrics, strong melodies and powerful vocals.

John Pemble / IPR

Taxes are getting a lot of attention at the statehouse and there were a few controversial bills that fell by the wayside last week and some that are moving forward. IPR's Joyce Russell reports on the week at the capitol. 

We expected the cold. It was, after all, the Winter Olympics.

But the wind is what has made an impression on many of us visiting Pyeongchang. It's even caused competition schedules to be rewritten.

For a string of days last week, the wind blew steady at 15 to 20 mph, with gusts of 45 mph. Concession stands and security scanners were toppled; temporary tents were blown away.

On the worst day, it looked as if a massive dust storm had descended. Three days later, we were still shaking sand out of our boots.

Atlanta Police are seeking an Uber Eats driver who they say killed a customer during a delivery.

The department confirmed to NPR that officers responded to a call of a person shot in the Buckhead neighborhood in north Atlanta on Saturday around 11:30 p.m.. Investigators learned from witnesses that the victim left his apartment to meet an Uber Eats driver, took his order and began walking away from the delivery vehicle.

Nick Cunningham grew up far from the snow in Monterey, on California's central coast. He ran track at Boise State University.

None of that hinted at the route he would take after graduation — trying out for the U.S. bobsled team.

"I figured it would be a graduation gift for myself to kind of do something that's outside the box, outside my comfort zone," said Cunningham, 32. "Just try something none of my friends could ever say that they tried out for. And so I went and tried out. And 18 months later, I went to my first Olympics."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has confirmed that it has begun proceedings against Russian curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, who won a bronze medal in curling as part of the Olympic Athletes from Russia team at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Krushelnitckii finished third in the mixed-doubles curling tournament, competing with his wife and teammate, Anastasia Bryzgalova.

Food scientists at the University of Massachussetts Amherst have come up with a technique they say could make it a lot easier to avoid food poisoning.

The main piece of equipment? Your smartphone.

Currently, to identify the bacteria that can get you sick, like E. coli or salmonella, food scientists often use DNA testing.

They obtain samples from, say, raw spinach or chicken skin, by rinsing the food and collecting a tiny bit of bacteria from the water. Then they let that bacteria multiply over 24 hours to get a big enough sample.

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The 2018 Iowa legislative session is underway, and Iowa Public Radio is covering what's happening. Listen to our weekly podcast "Under the Golden Dome" and stay current on issues that impact you.

Studio One Featured Release

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Featured Release This Week From Tune-Yards + Studio One Tracks Top 30 Playlist

In 2006, New England-born musician Merrill Garbus started her lo-fi folk project Tune-Yards (sometimes known as tUnE-yArDs... artists! ), releasing a debut album in 2009. Along the way, Nate Brenner became the other core member of the band, playing bass and various synths and programs. For album number four, provocatively titled I Can Feel You Creep Into My Private Life, Garbus and Brenner co-produced the record, and co-wrote the music. Garbus did write all of the lyrics, questioning culture...

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The Latest from IPR Classical

Listen Now: Violinist Jennifer Frautschi Interview

Last September, concert violinist Jennifer Frautschi performed in Des Moines with the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra. As the Chicago Tribune noted, "violinist Jennifer Frautschi is molding a career with smart interpretations of both warhorses and rarities." Equally at home in the classic and contemporary repertoire, her recent seasons have featured innumerable performances and recordings of works ranging from Brahms and Schumann to Berg and Schoenberg. Ms. Frautschi spoke to Jacqueline...

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