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Joyce Russell/IPR

Collective Bargaining Bill Passes House and Senate; Governor Branstad Applauds

After three days of bitter partisan debate, the Iowa House and Senate today gave final approval to legislation critics say will decimate Iowa’s collective bargaining law that covers 180-thousand public employees in Iowa. A handful of Republican voters defied their leadership and voted with Democrats against the bill. The vote in the House was 53 to 47. The bill passed the Senate by a vote of 29 to 21. Democrats argued through the night and up to the afternoon, making a last pitch on behalf of...

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The 2017 Iowa legislative session is underway, and Iowa Public Radio is covering what's happening. Listen to our weekly podcast "Under the Golden Dome" and stay current on issues that impact you.

To paraphrase an age-old saying: If at first you don't succeed, well, dust off the historic launch pad and try another liftoff.

What a week it was for Donald Trump.

This is a two-part story on immigrants and small town viability. Part one aired on this Weekend Edition Saturday. For the full story, listen to both audio segments.

Like thousands of rural towns across the country, Cawker City, Kan., was built for bygone time.

Resident Linda Clover has spent most of her life in Cawker City, and she loves the place, but it's a shell of the town it used to be.

South Korea's government says it's convinced the North Korean regime orchestrated the bizarre poisoning death of Kim Jong Nam, the estranged half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"We are observing this pointless and merciless incident with grave concern," the South Korean Unification Ministry said in a statement Sunday.

At 98, Riichi Fuwa doesn't remember his Social Security number, but he remembers this: "19949. That was my number the government gave me," he said. "19949. You were more number than name."

That was the number that Fuwa was assigned when he was 24 years old, soon after he was forced off his family's farm in Bellingham, Wash., and incarcerated at the Tule Lake camp, just south of the Oregon border in California's Modoc County.

The Children's Relief Ministry orphanage sits at the end of a dirt road in Paynesville, Liberia. There's no running water or electricity. Many of the 40 or so boys and girls who live there lost their parents in the country's civil war or to the more recent Ebola epidemic.

Can Changing When And What We Eat Help Outwit Disease?

4 hours ago

I was worried that I might not be able to stick to an intermittent fasting schedule during my vacation in Mexico. It turns out, it was a breeze.

Because I was sick.

It started on the plane ride to Cozumel, a tingle in my throat and then the telltale sign that illness was imminent: three sneezes in a row. A clogged nose, a slight fever and a general feeling of malaise came over me after my third dive into the electric blue waters of the Caribbean.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Join us Lit City on Lit City, our new podcast that highlights some of the year’s best fiction and nonfiction.

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Studio One Featured Release

woodsist.com/woods

Featured Release This Week From Woods


City Sun Eater In The River Of Light is the ninth album from the Brooklyn-based band Woods. They formed in 2005, so that's nearly an album a year. Songwriter, vocalist and guitarist Jeremy Earl leads the band, and also runs Woods' label, Woodsist Records. Woods is a band that have made their name in the realm of lo-fi psych folk (or freak folk, if you prefer). Their new album is only the second to be recorded in a proper studio. As described by their record label, it's "a dense record...

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The Latest from IPR Classical

Miroslav Petrasko

SOI Presents: Orchestra Iowa's "A Night in Prague"

This week’s Symphonies of Iowa broadcast on February 19th at 4 p.m. and February 20th at 7 p.m. features Orchestra Iowa’s “A Night in Prague” concert. The orchestra performs works by Janáček, Mozart, and Dvořák. In a nod to the Czech history abounding in eastern Iowa, “A Night in Prague” offers a musical exploration of a heritage deeply embedded within our communities. Mozart’s popularity in the Czech capital increased with his overwhelmingly successful premiere of his 38th Symphony,...

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