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Education, Mental Health Slashed with Veto Pen

Governor Branstad Thursday vetoed millions of dollars in state spending the legislature approved last month, saying some of the appropriations are unsustainable. He trimmed back the more than seven billion dollar state budget for the fiscal year that started this week. The vetoes cut education spending for K-12 schools, community colleges, and the Regents Universities. Education advocates call the K-12 cuts shameful. Regents President Bruce Rastetter says they’ll begin considering what...
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As they rapidly run out of cash, Greece's banks could hardly be in a more precarious position.

For months, as this crisis has intensified people have been slowly withdrawing their money. The banks have been able to do business only because of emergency loans from the European Central Bank.

But when Greece missed a payment to the International Monetary Fund this week, the ECB decided not to lend any more money.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

For more than a century, the copper spires of St. Laurentius have stood tall over Philadelphia's Fishtown. But the city's oldest Polish church — founded in 1882 — could soon face the wrecking ball.

In Florida, the official state animal triggers mixed feelings. The Florida panther has been on the endangered species list for nearly 50 years. From a low point in the 1970s when there were only about 20 panthers in the wild, the species has rebounded.

Now, nearly 200 range throughout southwest Florida. And some officials, ranchers and hunters in the state say that may be about enough.

Florida panthers are a subspecies of the cougar or mountain lion. They're slightly smaller than their cousins, but like them, the panthers need lots of room to roam.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you five reads.

From Ina Jaffe, NPR's Los Angeles-based correspondent:

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

As the Founding Fathers established the United States of America, they had their eyes on the future and they knew they were making history. But not everyone had the same opinion of the timeline of that history.

Most thought the big day was July 4, when then Continental Congress approved the text of the Declaration of Independence and sent it to the printer. But John Adams believed July 2, 1776, was the really the big day.

Recent attacks in North Carolina have heightened the negative public perception of sharks. But for 21-year-old Australian Madison Stewart, sharks are almost family.

Since she was in her early teens, Stewart has made it her mission to preserve and educate the world about the creatures she feels so passionate about.

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djangodjango.co.uk

Featured Release This Week From Django Django

Django Django are often classified as an "art rock" band, which is appropriate since the band members met while attending Edinburgh College Of Art in Scotland. The group itself formed in London in 2009. Their new album, Born Under Saturn, is the follow-up to their 2012 debut full-length release. That first album received widespread critical acclaim, plus it was nominated for the 2012 Mercury Prize (awarded annually for best album of the year in the UK). Incidentally, Django Django have...
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Michael Leland Named News Director at Iowa Public Radio

Iowa Public Radio is pleased to announce that Michael Leland will join Iowa Public Radio as News Director, effective July 1.

IPR News Team Wins Awards

IPR News Team Wins Awards

Talk show producer Emily Woodbury and reporter Amy Mayer have been awarded regional Edward R. Murrow awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association for their reporting this past year.

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