minimum wage

Linn County’s Supervisors are considering possibly raising the minimum wage in the region including Iowa’s second largest city, and have formed a study committee. Supervisors’ Chairman Ben Rogers says Linn County will thoroughly study increasing the Cedar Rapids area minimum wage.

“Many of us feel, like providers and community groups, felt that Johnson County rushed their discussion and implementation of the minimum wage,” he says.

Linn’s study committee includes small and large businesses, and hasn’t met yet.  Rogers says it could even recommend wage increase exemptions.

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Johnson County’s experiment setting a county minimum wage above the state’s $7.25 an hour produced another version last night.

Tiffin’s city council gave first reading to an ordinance setting wage minimums at $9 an hour.

The only ‘no’ vote came from council-woman Jo Kahler.

“I do not feel we have any business telling businesses what they should pay in wages,” she said in an interview on Tuesday.

Until Tiffin gives final approval to its own $9 ordinance, the Johnson County supervisors’ $8.20 an hour prevails.

A member of Iowa’s Board of Regents says Johnson County’s raising of the minimum wage is “out of step with the rest of Iowa”.

Johnson County is incrementally raising the wages to at least $10.10 an hour by 2017, action taken by the County Board of Supervisors.

At today’s Regents meeting in Ames, Regent Larry McKibben of Marshalltown said he’ll oppose extending that to the University of Iowa campus.

“I’m working hard to reduce debt of families and children, and we can’t be an outlier vis-a-vis the other two universities, and I want an answer to that,” he said.

Linn County’s Board of Supervisors is exploring increasing the minimum wage.  The county is home to Cedar Rapids, Iowa’s second largest city.   The minimum wage next door in Johnson County is already 95-cents higher than the state’s $7.25 an hour, and will go to ten dollars an hour two years from now.

Linn Supervisors Board chairman, Ben Rogers, says a possible increase in the county will be studied carefully and methodically.