Here and Now

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

Financial markets in the U.S. are beginning to rebound from Brexit shock. The three major indexes have gained back more than half of their losses since the vote last week. In Europe, stocks and the value of the pound have also been gaining, after a dramatic plunge last week that many feared could touch off a global financial crisis.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ron Suskind’s best-selling book, “Life Animated, A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism,” tells the story of how he and his family discovered that Disney films were a way to communicate with his son Owen, who has autism.

In early May, Uber and Lyft stopped operating in Austin, Texas, after the city voted against allowing the ride share companies to use their own background check systems for drivers rather than adopt the fingerprint background checks required for taxi drivers.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Ryan Holiday, editor at large of New York Observer, about how Uber and Lyft’s departure has affected Austin so far.

Do Traffic Classes Lead To Better Drivers?

Jun 29, 2016

South Florida drivers have a reputation for driving fast.

Last year, almost 800,000 people in Florida were pulled over for speeding, as did Wilson Sayre from Here & Now contributor WLRN in Miami. She reports on whether the traffic classes that many ticketed drivers take actually makes them better drivers.

Read more on this story via WLRN

Sixty years ago today, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal Highway Act of 1956. It marked the birth of the interstate highway system, now a 47,000-mile network designed to ease crowded, crumbling roads in post-war America.

At the time, it was sold as one of the most ambitious public works projects ever, but six decades later, many interstates are overcrowded and under maintained. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with William Wilkins of The Road Information Program.

As “A Prairie Home Companion” creator Garrison Keillor wraps up his decades-long run at the helm this year, Here & Now today begins a two-day goodbye to the show. Here & Now‘s Robin Young paid with a visit to “Prairie Home” backstage at Tanglewood, the last live broadcast before host Keillor leaves.

Today’s segment features a conversation with Fred Newman, the show’s sound effects artist, about the show, his skill set and how he comes up with all the wonderful, zany audio highlights of his act.

The University of Tennessee Lady Vols coach Pat Summitt died early this morning, at age 64, after battling early onset dementia. Summitt’s friend and co-author, the Washington Post columnist Sally Jenkins, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young, to talk about Summitt’s life and legacy.

Guest

Sally Jenkins, Washington Post columnist. She tweets @sallyjenx.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with former Treasury Secretary and Harvard University president Larry Summers about what “Brexit” might be mean for markets around the world and in the U.S., and whether we are at risk of a recession or other economic downturns.

The artist Christo’s latest project, “The Floating Piers,” is a walkway covered in yellow-orange fabric that stretches almost two miles into Lake Iseo in northern Italy, connecting two islands with the mainland. The project is open to the public for just 16 days, from June 18 to July 3, then it will be dismantled and recycled.

The earth is crumbling in West Texas. Scientists from Southern Methodist University have new research that shows two massive sinkholes between the towns of Wink and Kermit are expanding.

Years of drilling for oil and gas have helped wash away salt beds underneath the ground. A shifting water table has made the problem worse and in some places the ground is sinking five inches a year, according to the satellite readings.

AirBnb announced this morning that it is suing the city of San Francisco, home to its headquarters. The city has enacted a new law that would force all AirBnb hosts to register with the city, or AirBnb would face a $1,000 fine per host.

Tennessee state Rep. Andy Holt refuses to back down from his decision to give away an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle, similar to the one used by the Orlando shooter, at a fundraiser this weekend. In fact, Holt says he will now give away two of them. He insists that the weapon, which is similar to the one used in Orlando, is not to blame for the massacre.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Holt, who represents three counties in the northwestern corner of the state, about his decision.

Far-right politicians in Europe are praising Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. French leader Marine Le Pen called it a victory for freedom. Dutch politician Geert Wilders called for a similar referendum for the Netherlands.

German politician Beatrix von Storch agrees. Von Storch tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that wanting to control one’s national borders isn’t racist or xenophobic, “it’s just normal.”

Women in the U.S. face many financial challenges beyond the gender wage gap, including saving enough for retirement.

In a View From The Top conversation, Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Ellevest CEO Sallie Krawcheck about how the company’s newly launched platform aims to help women better invest for their future.

See more in our View From The Top series

Interview Highlights: Sallie Krawcheck

On the gender investment gap

Mick Cornett, the mayor of Oklahoma City, grew up there and saw the city he now leads rebound from the 1995 bombing of the Murrah federal building. He’s the incoming head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which meets in Indianapolis this weekend.

In a conversation with Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd, Cornett weighs in on how a city recovers from a terrorist attack, and describes the crisis facing virtually every mayor in the U.S.: how to pay for repairs to crumbling infrastructure like roads and bridges.

Growing Diet Divide Between Rich And Poor

Jun 22, 2016

Economic inequality has been a central theme of the 2016 presidential race: the rich are getting richer, the poor are getting poorer, the middle class is shrinking. But diet inequality is growing, too.

Increasingly, wealthy Americans are eating healthier than poorer Americans. Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks to Anna Vlasits of STAT, the national health and medicine publication, about what’s behind the diet divide.

After six years of effort, House GOP leaders are announcing a new plan today that would replace the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act, if it is repealed. Meanwhile, a new analysis shows that the U.S. will actually spend less on healthcare in the near future than expected.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Julie Rovner, senior correspondent at Kaiser Health News, about where Obamacare stands now.

One hundred years ago, President Woodrow Wilson signed into law the National Park Service Organic Act, creating the National Park Service. On Aug. 25,  the Park Service will celebrate the centennial of America’s parks system. Leading up to the celebration, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson is talking to park rangers and officials across the country.

Why Should Americans Care About 'Brexit?'

Jun 22, 2016

It’s easy for Americans to see the Brexit debate as a British issue. But the personal finance website Bankrate.com says if Britons vote tomorrow to exit the European Union, European vacations will likely be cheaper, mortgage rates might fall, the stock market could drop, and it would be harder to find a job in Britain.

Here & Now’s Lisa Mullins talks to economist Diane Swonk about the impact of Brexit on Americans.

What is your opinion on the Brexit? Let us know in a Here & Now poll:

In two days Britain will vote on whether to leave the European Union, and the latest polls show a slight tilt towards “Remain,” or Britain remaining in the E.U., and away from “Brexit,” or leaving the E.U.

Two British university students with differing opinions tell Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd why they’re voting for – and against – remaining in the E.U.

Interview Highlights: Grace Kneafsey & Dominic Norcliffe-Brown

On reasons to leave the European Union

Many analysts have compared Donald Trump’s campaign with that of Barry Goldwater, the outspoken conservative Arizona senator who lost in a 1964 landslide to Lyndon Johnson.

On Saturday Trump invited the comparison, hosting a fundraiser in the late Arizona senator’s former home. The Goldwater family no longer owns that property in Paradise Valley, Arizona, but the event has nonetheless fueled comparisons to the conservative icon.

The Politics Of Silicon Valley's Elite

Jun 21, 2016

Apple CEO Tim Cook will hold a fundraiser with Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan next week, according to an article published by Politico. The news comes days after Apple’s decision to pull its financial and technical support for the upcoming Republican National Convention, citing previous inflammatory comments made by the party’s presumptive nominee Donald Trump.

After a series of high profile sex discrimination lawsuits in the last 20 years, Wall Street firms have expanded diversity training and programs. However, Harvard Business Review reports that diversity does not seem to be improving, and that part of the reason may have to do with how diversity programs are conducted.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with HBR’s Curt Nickisch about what works and what doesn’t.

California’s prolonged drought has led to millions of dead trees that could make tinder boxes of huge swaths of the state as it heads into fire season. But the American West isn’t the only place coming to grips with chronic drought.

The World Resources Institute mapped water stress around the world and found major regions of every inhabited continent have serious issues with water. Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd gets an overview of drought crises around the world from Betsy Otto, director of the World Resources Institute’s Global Water Program.

The United Kingdom votes Thursday on a proposal to leave the European Union. Last week, voters appeared to favor a Brexit for the first time since polling began on the referendum, but after the murder of MP Jo Cox, “Remain” is on top once again.

Nonetheless, economists are nervous that the move could have ripple effects for economic growth, trade and finance across Europe.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd discusses the economic implications of Brexit with Marcel Fratzscher, president of The German Institute for Economic Research.

Millions of dollars are pouring into various funds to help the families of the victims and the survivors of the Orlando attack. Attorney Kenneth Feinberg has been in charge of several similar funds after other tragedies, including 9/11, the Virginia Tech massacre and the Boston Marathon bombings.

He’s been consulting on how to handle the Orlando situation, and talks about the situation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

This week, presumed Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump once again called for a temporary ban on Muslims and suggested President Obama was sympathetic to terrorists. Presumed Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton called Trump’s ideas nonsense, and called for a national assault weapons ban. Her rival Bernie Sanders, in a video message to supporters last night, didn’t concede the race and didn’t endorse Clinton.

Former Green Party candidate and consumer advocate Ralph Nader says the two-party American political system creates “second class citizens” out of third-party candidates.

He speaks with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the flaws he saw in the Democratic primary, and says those who still blame him for Al Gore’s presidential loss in 2000 are “fact deprived.”

Interview Highlights: Ralph Nader

On which candidate he’s supporting

Senate Republicans have agreed to allow votes on two potential gun control measures, following a 15-hour filibuster led by Democratic Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut.

Twenty years ago, after a mass shooting in Australia that killed 35 people, the government there enacted strict gun laws. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks to the former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, Tim Fischer, about the challenges they faced and the lessons the U.S. government could learn.

Connecticut Democrat Chris Murphy ended a nearly 15-hour filibuster early this morning, saying Republican leaders had promised him they will hold votes on amendments to expand gun sale background checks and ban gun sales to people placed on security watch lists.

But NPR’s Sue Davis tells Here & Now‘s Robin Young that Republicans are expected to have enough votes to defeat the measures, even though polling this week shows support is growing for gun control.

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