All Things Considered

  • Hosted by Pat Blank, Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, and Audie Cornish

Weekdays at 4 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

Every weekday, "All Things Considered" hosts Michele Norris, Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish present the program's trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews and offbeat features.

As more victims speak out about their allegations, employers — including NPR — are having to confront the failure of their sexual harassment training and reporting systems.

Even trainers themselves say the system has failed.

"We have been checking the box for decades," says Patricia Wise, an employment attorney who served on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commision's task force on harassment. "I don't think people have been very motivated."

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Devin Kelley, the man we now know killed more than two dozen people at a Texas church on Sunday, escaped a mental health facility before the Air Force could try him on charges that he beat his wife and baby stepson back in 2012.

And President Trump, like many people before him, is pointing to mental health — not guns — as the cause of the church massacre.

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President Trump is facing a lawsuit for blocking people from his Twitter account.

This week some First Amendment advocates joined the suit — and they are making a novel argument about the right to communicate with the president in the digital age.

This is part of an occasional series: Is My Job Safe? These stories look at jobs that might be at risk because of technology and automation.

Shannon Capone Kirk's first job as a young lawyer in the late '90s was "document review."

It meant "spending weeks upon weeks in either a warehouse or a conference room flipping through bankers boxes and reading paper documents," says Kirk, who now runs the electronic legal research practice, known as e-discovery, at Ropes & Gray in Boston.

The process was time-consuming and expensive.

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Three years ago, British soul singer Sam Smith released his debut album "In The Lonely Hour."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "STAY WITH ME")

SAM SMITH: (Singing) Oh, won't you stay with me? 'Cause you're all I need.

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I'm joined in studio by NPR's Ryan Lucas. And, Ryan, Nannette was telling us there has been a massive federal response on the ground. She said the ATF, the FBI. How typical is that? And tell us, what are they going to be looking for?

Editor's note: This story includes language that may be offensive to some readers.

Her career spans decades in film, television and theater. She has worked with the biggest names in Hollywood and on Broadway. Along the way, she has become one of them.

Jenifer Lewis' new memoir, The Mother of Black Hollywood, details her journey to the spotlight. It comes out next week. Lewis spoke with NPR's Noel King about the book and how her career began.

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Owner Joe Ricketts has closed local news sites that are part of the Gothamist network. Gothamist and DNAinfo newsrooms voted to unionize last week. Ari Shapiro talks to Julia Wick who had been editor-in-chief of LAist.

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Updated at 11:56 p.m. ET: NPR has obtained the full memo from a Democratic source. Read it at the bottom of this story.

What, exactly, did the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign agree to in 2015, before any votes had been cast in the Democratic primary?

NPR's Ari Shapiro checks in with Jon Thurman, one of Bowe Bergdahl's company-mates, about Bergdahl's sentencing on Friday. The Army sergeant walked off his base in 2009 and was captured by a Taliban affiliate, which triggered a manhunt that resulted in several seriously injured service members. He will receive a dishonorable discharge but no prison time.

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The Flint water crisis was a turning point for many environmental groups. It prompted a focus on issues like drinking water infrastructure as well as on the people left out of the movement. There are renewed efforts to better engage people of color to engage with the environmental movement.

NPR CEO Jarl Mohn apologized to angered staffers in a contentious meeting Friday afternoon even as additional women accused the network's former top news executive of sexually harassing them.

"I've let you down," Mohn said, according to people present. "I should have acted sooner and I should have acted more forcefully."

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