The Well Pennies: Iowa's newest folk transplant

Jan 12, 2017

In this episode of IPR Studio One's "Java Blend," host Ben Kieffer welcomes the signature pop melodies and tight harmonies of The Well Pennies to Iowa. 

The folk duo, who recently relocated from Los Angeles to Des Moines, earned national acclaim for their rendition of the classic Beatles tune "All My Loving," featured on a 2013 release called "Beatles Reimagined." 

Download the free podcast below to hear The Well Pennies play their Beatles takes and well-crafted original music that spans the length of their careers. 

The Well Pennies are a Folk/Pop duo consisting of husband and wife team Bryan & Sarah Vanderpool. The pair met in Boston while supporting each other’s solo sets at popular venues like Club Passim, Lizard Lounge, and The Middle East. They fell in love, ran away to Los Angeles and released their debut EP that was met with critical acclaim from press like Interview Magazine, Under the Radar, Daily Unsigned, and countless others. Taking influence from The Lumineers, Passenger, and Sufjan Stevens, the pair combine their signature pop melodies and tight harmonies with beautifully produced lush string arrangements. The band explains, “Our goal is to write songs that inspire something – however simple – to smile, to love, to get out and experience life.” 

After a recent transplant from Los Angeles to Des Moines, Iowa, The Well Pennies are currently organizing a tour of concerts with local youth orchestras to promote their latest release, "Endlings”, the long awaited and highly anticipated LP from The Well Pennies that was released on January 27th, 2015. In 1936, a Tasmanian Tiger died in the Hobart Zoo in Tasmania.  He was the very last one…an endling. The Well Pennies explore this topic of extinction and how it relates to all aspects of life. "The album is about protecting what’s important,” the band explains. “Not only are the environment and animals endangered in this day and age; hope, human connection and artistry are becoming more of a rarity. And if we don’t value the things that are most important to us, they will become harder and harder to find.”