Lindsey Moon

Talk Show Producer

Lindsey Moon started as a talk show producer with Iowa Public Radio in May of 2014. She comes to IPR by way of Illinois Public Media, an NPR/PBS dual licensee in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois, and Wisconsin Public Radio where she’s worked as a producer and a general assignment reporter.

Lindsey is an Iowa native and a 2012 graduate of the University of Iowa with degrees in Anthropology and Journalism. Her work has earned awards from the Wisconsin Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated and the Northwest Broadcast News Association and has aired on NPR’s All Things Considered.

In her free time, she’s a bookworm, and enjoys running half marathons, seeing live music and scuba diving whenever there’s time and money to plan a trip. Lindsey’s favorite public radio programs are Wait, Wait… Don’t Tell Me! and Talk of Iowa

Emily Woodbury

Motivated by the Me Too movement, FilmScene in Iowa City is hosting "Women's March," a month-long series celebrating films directed by women filmmakers. At an Animation Camp on March 15 and 16, young filmmakers - specifically girls and genderqueer youth ages 11 to 13 - learned to make their own animated films. 

On this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with FilmScene programming director Rebecca Fons about the motivation behind the animation camp as well as participants' experiences.

Jeff Eaton/Flickr

Gil Cranberg passed away on Sunday at the age of 93. His career as an editorial writer for the Des Moines Register spanned 33 years. He will be remembered as an ethical newsman whose work focused on civil rights, inequality, and criminal justice. 

Wikimedia Commons/U.S. Department of State

It's been another whirlwind week in politics. President Trump fired his Secretary of State Rex Tillerson on Twitter, to be replaced with CIA Director Mike Pompeo. The president is also backing off of his promise to have a conversation about gun control; and the Stormy Daniels saga continues.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Rachel Caufield, associate professor of political science at Drake University, and Steffen Schmidt, university professor of political science at Iowa State University.

John Pemble / IPR file

There has been lots of movement at the Iowa Statehouse this week. An omnibus energy bill that discussed earlier this week on River to River passed in the Senate and is now heading to the house. There's also a bill that would make it so the Iowa Supreme Court would require a super majority to vote a law unconstitutional that remains a live wire.

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Iowa Public Radio's Joyce Russell and the Des Moines Register's Bill Petroski about what you need to know this week about what the legislature is doing. 

Clay Masters / IPR

President Donald Trump has announced tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Does that mean the U.S. is on the verge of a trade war? It's also been a week of departures for staffers at the White House, and Vice President Mike Pence visited Iowa.  During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Jim McCormick of Iowa State University and Dennis Goldford of Drake University about the week in politics. 

Alan Levine/Flickr

A bill being discussed at the statehouse, Senate File 2311, could mean major changes in Iowa when it comes to energy. Opponents say it would end Iowa’s energy efficiency programs, the ones that provide rebates to customers for buying energy efficient appliances and doing things like energy audits and installing new insulation.

Courtesy of Sam Auen

Even if you don’t know Sam Auen’s name, you’ve probably heard of his Des Moines restaurants, Tacopocolypse and Krunkwich Ramen House. He’s got a lot of personality and a lot of ideas. He’s been on the Food Networks' Diner’s Drive Ins and Dives and Guy's Grocery Games. He’s a die-hard cyclist and he blogs at the The Vulgar Vegan. During this Talk of Iowa conversation, he talks with host Charity Nebbe. 

Consulate General of Canada in Minneapolis

The U.S., Canada, and Mexico are heading into the seventh round of renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement. President Donald Trump has called it “the worst trade deal in history” and has at times called for ending the program.

During this River to River conversation, host Ben Kieffer talks with Paul Connors, Canada’s Consul General, about Iowa’s trading relationship with Canada. According to Connors, 100,000 jobs in Iowa depend on a positive trade relationship with our neighbors to the north. 

Aaron Burden

Many fans are excited about the new film adaptation of A Wrinkle in Time, and many are rereading the mind-bending. heart-warming book in anticipation.

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with author and bookseller Sarah Prineas and Jerri Heid, Youth Services Manager at the Ames Public Library, about literary touchstones, like A Wrinkle in Time, that shaped young readers.

Andrea / Flickr

The pressure society puts on boys can be tough to deal with and lead to problems down the road.

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with speakers from the What About Me(n) Summit taking place Wednesday, February 28 at the Iowa Memorial Union in Iowa City. They talk about traditional masculinity, toxic masculinity, and authentic masculinities in anticipation of the summit.

Matt Duboff

The Iowa AAU is hosting its first ever high school girls state championship this weekend in Des Moines.

During this Talk of Iowa interview, host Charity Nebbe sits down with Jason Lloyd, Iowa AAU Women’s Wrestling Director and National AAU Women’s Co-Director for Women’s Wrestling. Lloyd says despite being the largest growing wrestling demographic, girls may face opposition in pursuing the male-dominated sport.

Food Bank of Iowa

One in eight Iowans struggle with hunger. One in six of those Iowans are children, according to the nonprofit organization Feeding Hunger. The Trump Administration has proposed replacing SNAP benefits with blue apron style food boxes, and calls for cutting food assistance for Iowans drastically in his proposed budget. 

Heidi Ehalt

For the last decade Sean Sherman, also known as the Sioux Chef, has been on a mission to educate Midwesterners about indigenous food and the recipes of his ancestors. Sherman is Ogalala Lakota, and his new cookbook is called The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen. During this Talk of Iowa interview, he talks with host Charity Nebbe.  

The Iowa Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was founded in 1997 in Arnold’s Park, Iowa. Just over 10 years old, the hall has named a number of prominent Iowa musicians, music lovers and promoters to be a part of its legacy. Every year, there is a vote to induct people who have made a significant contribution to music in Iowa.

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

With a budget proposal, debate over a path forward on immigration reform in the Senate, a senior White House staffer being accused of domestic violence, and continued allegations about President Trump's so-called non-relationship with Stormy Daniels—there's much to discuss this week in political news.

John S / Flickr


Anonymous sources have played a big role in the flurry of reporting and rapid-fire revelations surrounding the Trump administrations and investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, and possible collusion with members of the Trump campaign.

John Pemble / IPR

Opioid use is a growing problem across the country, and Iowa is no exception. During this hour of River to River, we’ll hear about legislation being considered at the statehouse to curb issues created by the use of opioids in Iowa. 

Iowa Public Radio's Joyce Russell, Republican State Senator Dan Dawson, Republican State Representative Shannon Lundgren, Republican State Representative Dave Heaton, and Democratic State Representative Chuck Isenhart all join the conversation. 

Photo by Amy Mayer / Iowa Public Radio

The average American farmer is 60 years old. That means that in the next decade, a lot of land in the country is going to be changing hands.

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Graham Merriweather, director of a new documentary called Farmers for America, which features more than 20 farmers across the country. 

Photo Courtesty of Timothy LeDuc

Timothy LeDuc of Cedar Rapids has been dreaming of skating in the Olympics since he was a little kid. He says he used to tape U.S. Olympic figure skating on his VCR.  He would re-watch it with his younger sister Leah until the tapes wore out. This year, he is an alternate for the U.S. figure skating pairs team with his partner, Ashley Cain. 

During this Talk of Iowa interview, LeDuc talks with host Charity Nebbe about how he got his start skating in Iowa and his decision to speak out in support of other gay athletes in the run up to the 2018 Olympic games. 

David Wilson / Wikimedia Commons

The annual Winter Dance Party in Clear Lake and the Surf Ballroom, which commemorates the anniversary of a plane crash that killed Buddy Holly, "the Big Bopper," and Richie Valens, is this weekend. This year, it will be a special celebration Saturday night.

This is the first year in a long time that Dean Snyder, whose family saved the Surf from being demolished, and Darryl Hensley, aka The Mad Hatter, who founded the Winter Dance Party, won't be in attendance. 

Grendelkhan / Wikimedia Commons

Proponents of solar energy in Iowa are worried about a proposal under study in both chambers of the legislature. They say it would deregulate the rate-making process for utility companies by allowing them to change rates for various classes of customers without receiving Iowa Utility Board approval. Former legislator Tyler Olson, now president of SiteGen Solar in Cedar Rapids, says that move would harm the state’s growing solar industry.

At a recent Iowa high school basketball game, the visiting team had to endure racist chants by rival students in the stands. During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with a school superintendent about how the immigration debate is impacting one of Iowa's most diverse communities. 

Karsten Moran / Redux Pictures

New York Times Magazine Staff Writer Nikole Hannah-Jones is no stranger to hard conversations about race. She grew up in Waterloo, Iowa, being bused to a school across town that was mostly white, compared to her majority black neighborhood. She says she grew up spending about two hours on the bus each day. 

Gisela Giardino/Flickr

"Wine is to women as duck tape is to men: it fixes everything. " "I make wine disappear, what's your super power?" "I'm dreaming of a white Christmas, but if the white runs out, I'll drink red."

These are supposed to be jokes, but they may also be indicative of a growing problem. During this hour on Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Ann Dowsett-Johnson, author of "Drink: The Intimate Relationship Between Women and Alcohol," about women's relationship with drinking culture. 

Martin Falbisoner/Wikimedia Commons

The government shutdown lasted three days. What did it accomplish, and what will be the way forward on immigration? 

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Wayne Moyer, Rosenfield professor of political science at Grinnell College and Rachel Caufield, associate professor of political science at Drake University about the shutdown, the Russia investigation, Trump's visit to Davos, and Vice President Mike Pence's trip the Middle East. 

State Capitol Ceiling
John Pemble / IPR

Iowa legislators have said that addressing the state's water quality is a priority.  During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Mary Skopec, who is executive director of Iowa's Lakeside Laboratory. She says that the problem with nutrient run-off from the state's 29 million acres of agricultural land is not the only issue to be addressed—it is a part of the problem.

Watching the local evening news on television was once routine in nearly every household. Increasingly, that is no longer the case according to a study by the Pew Research Center. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with KCRG-TV's News Director Adam Carros about how his newsroom is handling a decline in viewership. 

He says many networks are working to cut deals with streaming services like Apple TV, Roku, Hulu and Netflix. 

Clayton Treloar/Flickr

It starts as a minor inconvenience with no water coming out of the tap, but frozen pipes can quickly turn into a major crisis. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, home improvement expert Bill McAnally joins host Charity Nebbe to talk about caring for and inspecting your pipes. 

Daniel R. Blume /

Obituaries are not what they used to be. They have gone through many changes since they first started appearing in newspapers, but in recent years they have been radical and rapid. 

Iowa writer Mary Kay Shanley has been studying obituaries and how they've changed; she also teaches people how to write them. During this Talk of Iowa conversation, she talks with host Charity Nebbe. 

Shanley is also the author of Our State Fair: Iowa's Blue Ribbon Story, The Memory Box, and She Taught Me to Eat Artichokes. 

Photo Courtesy of Justin Roberts

There is a lot of children's music out there, and some of it is really bad. But over the course of the last two decades, children's music as a genre has become a home for many smart, funny, and talented musicians. Iowa native Justin Roberts is one of them. 

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, he talks with host Charity Nebbe about his newest album Lemonade, which has been nominated for a Grammy this year. It's his third time being nominated. 

On this album, he has several laugh out loud funny songs, including one called "Valentine."