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6:10 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Good Samaritan's Car Averts Pedestrian Crash

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A flat tire could have been tragic for an Ohio man, but for a good Samaritan who stopped to help and whose own car was then struck by a drunk driver.

Gerald Gronowski told the Cleveland Plain Dealer that he and his son would surely have been hit as they stood on the shoulder. All the more miraculous, the stranger, Christopher Manacci, had rescued Gronowski eight years earlier, pulling out a hook embedded in his hand while he was fishing.

Religion
4:03 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Text Reignites Debate: Did Jesus Have A Wife?

A Harvard researcher says a "new gospel" written on a fragment of papyrus shows some early Christians believed Jesus had a wife. The fragment — which scholars believe was written in the fourth century — is creating a sensation among New Testament experts.

Business
3:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Business News

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 5:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with an adjustment to the oil supply.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Business
3:49 am
Wed September 19, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:04 am

The most expensive work of art ever sold at auction is going on public display at New York's Museum of Modern Art. For six months starting in late October, museum-goers can stare into the abyss suggested by Munch's iconic image of a screaming man beneath a swirling orange sky.

The Salt
2:05 am
Wed September 19, 2012

So What Happens If The Farm Bill Expires? Not Much, Right Away

Sens. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Pat Toomey, R-Pa., talk to reporters about the farm bill at the U.S. Capitol in June.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 3:53 pm

Congress is set to make a brief appearance in Washington this week, then recess until after Election Day. That means a farm bill is likely to be left undone, just one of the many items on lawmakers' "to-do" lists that won't happen anytime soon.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:04 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Ebola's Other Victims: Health Care Workers

A medical worker from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention works at the laboratory where Ebola specimens from the Congo were tested at the start of the latest outbreak.
Stephen Wandera AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:51 am

The Ebola virus continues to strike people in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since May, the World Health Organization has counted 72 confirmed, probable or suspected cases and 32 deaths.

As usual, a disproportionate share of those cases are health care workers — 23 of them, almost a third.

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Law
2:04 am
Wed September 19, 2012

ACLU Pushes For Answers On Drone Strikes

A U.S. Predator drone flies through the night sky over Kandahar Air Field in Afghanistan. Drone strikes ordered by the Obama administration have killed more than a dozen al-Qaida leaders around the world.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:28 am

Drone strikes ordered by the Obama administration have killed more than a dozen al-Qaida leaders around the world, in places ranging from Afghanistan to Somalia. In speeches and public appearances, U.S. officials say those attacks are legal and essential to protect the nation's security.

But when civil liberties groups asked for more information about targeted killing, the CIA told them it's a secret.

On Thursday, they'll square off in front of a federal appeals court in Washington.

Pushing For Records

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Shots - Health Blog
2:02 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Scientists See Upside And Downside Of Sequencing Their Own Genes

Dr. James Watson looks at a reproduction of the structure of DNA, which he helped discover, in this 1962 photograph. Decades later, Watson was one of the first people to have his entire genome sequenced.
Mondadori Mondadori via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 3:03 pm

When scientists were looking for the first person to test a new, superfast way of deciphering someone's entire genetic blueprint, they turned to James Watson the guy who shared a Nobel Prize for discovering the structure of DNA.

"They had to sequence someone, so they got me," he says.

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Sweetness And Light
11:03 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

The Big East Conference: What's In A Name?

Big East commissioner Mike Aresco answers questions from the media before an NCAA college football game. Aresco says there are no plans for the conference to change its name.
Jessica Hill AP

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 7:45 am

All you have to know about the nonsense of college athletic conferences in America today is that the Big Ten has 12 members, and the Big Twelve has 10. Honestly.

But as badly as athletic conferences flunk arithmetic, they do no better with geography. Next year, for example, San Diego State will be in the Big East. This is like, you never could believe that Vladivostok, way out there, was really in Russia, could you?

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It's All Politics
6:40 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Explains Comments Again As GOP Unearths Obama Video

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign fundraising event in Salt Lake City on Tuesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 8:39 pm

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney took his effort to contain the damage from the video of his remarks about Americans who don't pay taxes to Fox News Channel Tuesday.

There, he acknowledged that some of those who don't pay federal income taxes are senior citizens and military service members.

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It's All Politics
6:11 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Pa. High Court Orders Judge To Review Voter ID Law

Emily Goldberg holds up a sign during the NAACP voter ID rally opposing Pennsylvania's voter ID law last Thursday in Philadelphia. With her is her 2-year-old daughter, Willa.
Michael Perez AP

Pennsylvania's highest court is returning the state's controversial voter ID law to a lower court judge who must decide whether it will disenfranchise some voters.

NPR's Jeff Brady reports that according to Tuesday's ruling, the lower court judge must block the law from taking effect if he finds voters cannot easily get photo ID cards that the law requires.

The state Supreme Court recognized difficulties in implementing the law under a "relatively short time frame," concluding:

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Education
6:09 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Chicago Teachers Union Delegates Vote To End Strike

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

In Chicago, teachers have suspended their strike. That means teachers and students could be back to class as soon as tomorrow. The strike lasted seven days.

And with us to explain what has transpired in Chicago is NPR's Claudio Sanchez. And, Claudio, teachers, as we've said, have suspended the strike. What has the reaction been?

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The Two-Way
6:06 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Obama: As President, You Work Hard For The Entire Country

President Obama responded to Mitt Romney's controversial "47 percent" comments in an interview with David Letterman this afternoon.

"My expectation is that if you want to be president, you have to work for everyone, not just for some," Obama said according to a pool report.

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The Two-Way
5:40 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Did Jesus Have A Wife? Newly Discovered Ancient Text Reignites Debate

The front of the papyrus fragment.
Karen L. King Harvard

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 9:30 am

An ancient piece of text is reviving an equally ancient debate: Was Jesus Christ married?

Of course, most Christians believe that he wasn't. But today, Harvard Professor of Divinity Karen King presented a scrap of papyrus that dates back to the fourth century. She told a gathering of scholars in Rome that written in Coptic was this surprising sentence: "Jesus said to them, 'My wife...' "

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Presidential Race
4:14 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Some Florida Seniors Divided On '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The fundraiser where the Romney video was recorded was held in Florida. And today, in that politically important state, reaction was mixed about Romney's unscripted remarks. NPR's Kathy Lohr gathered some views from people at a retirement community.

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Presidential Race
4:11 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney Still Doing Damage Control For '47 Percent'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Anytime a candidate calls an unexpected press conference in the evening, you know it's not good news. We look at the latest news and political fall out from the release of Mitt Romney's remarks at a private fundraiser. The comments were made in May and the recording was released by Mother Jones magazine.

Shots - Health Blog
4:10 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Link Between BPA And Childhood Obesity Is Unclear

Canned food is a source of BPA exposure, but researchers aren't sure whether it causes childhood obesity. Above, the soup isle at a grocery store in Washington, D.C.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:23 pm

BPA could be making kids fat. Or not.

That's the unsatisfying takeaway from the latest study on bisphenol A — the plastic additive that environmental groups have blamed for everything from ADHD to prostate disease.

Unfortunately, the science behind those allegations isn't so clear. And the new study on obesity in children and teens is no exception.

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Education
4:10 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Chicago Teachers Union Delegates Vote On Contract

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The teachers Union in Chicago votes later today for the second time on whether to and a strike that has kept 350,000 students and their parents in limbo. On Sunday, the union's House of Delegates voted to continue the weeklong strike until they have more time to read the outline on of a tentative agreement. That vote was a setback for union President Karen Lewis and her bargaining team.

NPR's Claudio Sanchez reports that with the vote pending, some teachers still don't know what's in that agreement.

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It's All Politics
4:02 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

'Mother Jones' Journalist: Video Not An Attempt To 'Catch Mitt Romney'

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 8:43 am

The Mother Jones journalist behind the release of a surreptitiously shot fundraising video says the source "did not go there looking to catch Mitt Romney in the act."

David Corn, the magazine's Washington bureau chief, tells NPR's Michel Martin on Tell Me More:

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
4:00 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

With Hats And Umbrellas, Senegalese Fill A City Niche

Senegalese vendor Cheikh Fall prepares his stall in front of Brooks Brothers on 51st Street, just off the Avenue of the Americas in New York City. Fall runs an association of Senegalese vendors that deals with the city over licensing and regulations.
Art Silverman NPR

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

Careful planning can transform the shape and life of a city. But sometimes, a city's features develop spontaneously — like the immigrant enclaves that grow around certain jobs and trades in urban centers like New York.

Occupational cliches have been a fact of life in the Big Apple for generations. Historically, New Yorkers thought of Jewish tailors, Italian greengrocers or Irish policemen, says Philip Kasinitz, a sociologist with the City University of New York.

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The Two-Way
3:34 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

In Fox Interview, Romney Doubles Down On '47 Percent' Comments

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:31 pm

"This is a message I'm carrying day in and day out and will carry over the coming months."

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The Salt
2:59 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Dr Pepper's Evolution Ad Strikes A Nerve With Some Christians

Dr Pepper's Facebook ad is the latest riff on a 1965 evolutionary graphic, which apparently still has the power to provoke.
Dr Pepper/Facebook

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:22 am

I'm a Pepper, You're a Pepper, but clearly, some people are not Peppers.

Dr Pepper's new Facebook ad campaign featuring an ape moving from all-fours, to seeing a soda on a rock, to an upright man, enjoying a Pepper, is apparently red meat to some creationists who are loudly expressing outrage at the idea that humans evolved from soda-discovering apes.

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The Two-Way
2:57 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

What Did Jimmy Carter's Grandson Have To Do With The Romney Video?

There is a partisan side to the video that is giving Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney headaches. The man who found the video online and then negotiated its full release was James Carter IV, President Jimmy Carter's grandson.

If you haven't heard by now, the video was released by Mother Jones and it shows Romney talking bluntly about 47 percent of the country, whom he says pay no taxes and think themselves "victims."

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Theater
2:33 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Shorts Inspire Music In 'Sounding Beckett' Trilogy

In Ohio Impromptu, one of three short plays featured in Sounding Beckett, the silent character (Philip Goodwin, left, with Ted van Griethuysen) inspired music based on knocks and repetitions.
Jeremy Tressler Sounding Beckett

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:09 pm

It all began last year, when the Library of Congress presented Samuel Beckett's Ohio Impromptu alongside a piece of music by composer Dina Koston, which responded to the text. A New York group, the Cygnus Ensemble, played the music, while Washington, D.C., director Joy Zinoman staged the play, for one night only.

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It's All Politics
2:24 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Romney's '47 Percent' Comments Complicate Swing-State Fortunes

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney speaks to reporters Monday in Costa Mesa, Calif.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:42 pm

The question of whether Mitt Romney's presidential campaign will be hurt by his characterization of 47 percent of Americans as people who believe they are victims, entitled to health care, food, housing, "you name it," is fairly settled.

Yes, it will — at least in the short run. Romney's problem? There's not much more campaign left than a short run.

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Music Reviews
1:58 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Two Attempts To Turn Summer Platinum Into Fall Gold

Carly Rae Jepsen and the cover of Kanye West's latest album, Cruel Summer.
Vanessa Heins Courtesy of Universal Music Group

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 8:47 am

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Middle East
1:52 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Journalist Examines Chaotic Fighting In Syria

Ghaith Abdul-Ahad is a correspondent for The Guardian reporting for PBS Frontline.
Martin Argles/The Guardian AP

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:23 pm

The battle in Syria is being fought by rebel fighters who lack many of the basics typically associated with warfare: helmets, a large supply of ammo, and military planning.

"I was with one fighter who had 11 bullets, and he was, like, roaming as a freelance fighter along the front line trying to pick up a fight somewhere," journalist Ghaith Abdul-Ahad tells Fresh Air contributor Dave Davies.

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The Two-Way
1:48 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

'Mother Jones' Releases Full, Unedited Romney Video

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:57 pm

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From Our Listeners
1:25 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Letters: Housing Market And Pervasive Poverty

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday and time to read from your comments.

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Health Care
1:24 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Hospitals Fight To Stop Superbugs' Spread

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 3:11 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. The NIH superbug claimed its seventh victim last week, more than six months after specialists at one of the country's most prestigious hospitals thought they had the outbreak contained. The bug is called Klebsiella - I'll get it right - Klebsiella pneumoniae, or KPC for short, and most antibiotics can't kill it. It's one of several drug-resistant bacteria that many hospitals struggle to control. The best known is probably MRSA.

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