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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Tibetan Farmer Is Eighth Protester To Self-Immolate This Month

The Tibetan Labrang Monastery in Gansu, northwestern China, is normally a place of tranquility. Now, it is also known for tragedy. Early this morning, a Tibetan farmer known as Dhondup headed to Labrang to perform the Buddhist ritual of walking around the monastery in prayer. Near the prayer hall inside the gold-roofed monastery, Dhondup lit himself ablaze in protest of Chinese rule in Tibet.

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Shots - Health News
3:37 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Drugs May Help More Americans Keep Hypertension Under Control

The use of multiple blood pressure medications may be helping some Americans bring their hypertension under control.
iStockphoto.com

With all the attention on meningitis, hantavirus, and West Nile virus outbreaks lately, it's worth remembering that regular old cardiovascular disease is still the number one

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It's All Politics
3:32 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

One More Time: Here's Where To Get Debate 'Fact Checks'

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:06 pm

While President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney are debating tonight in Boca Raton, Fla., the fact checkers at news outlets and independent organizations will again be busy.

So for those who want to know where to go for their truth squadding:

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Law
3:24 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

What Happens After Jurors Get It Wrong?

Juror Anita Woodruff is haunted by her decision to help convict Santae Tribble of murder.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 7:16 pm

About 300 people have been wrongfully convicted and exonerated in the U.S. thanks to DNA evidence. But overlooked in those stories are the accounts of jurors who unwittingly played a role in the injustice.

One of those stories is playing out in Washington, D.C., where two jurors who helped convict a teenager of murder in 1981 are now persuaded that they were wrong. They're dealing with their sense of responsibility by leading the fight to declare him legally innocent.

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Around the Nation
3:24 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Mug Shot Time? Wipe That Smile Off Your Face

Say cheese? A sampling of smiling mug shots posted to the Mecklenburg County Sheriff's website during the past three weeks.
Jennifer Lang of WFAE

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:46 pm

In one North Carolina county, mugging too much for a mug shot can get you locked in a cell indefinitely.

First off, though, why would you smile for a mug shot? Thumb through those publications like The Slammer magazine filled with nothing but mug shots and you can find entire sections of people grinning it up.

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Sports
3:24 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Amid Lockout, Ohio NHL Fans Cheer Virtual Team

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:25 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The National Hockey League was supposed to launch its new season a week and a half ago, but a labor dispute has put that on hold. Still, that didn't stop fans of the Blue Jackets, based in Columbus, Ohio, from piling into a local bar last Friday to watch their team's home opener. Without a real game to watch, Michael Darr(ph), co-owner of Our Bar in Columbus, decided to show a video game simulation instead.

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Music Interviews
2:58 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Kendra Morris: Skateboards And Karaoke Machines

Kendra Morris' debut album is titled Banshee.
Eric White Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 5:25 pm

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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Oldest Auschwitz Survivor, A Teacher Who Defied Nazis, Dies At 108

Antoni Dobrowolski during a 2009 interview.
TVB24

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 9:57 am

Antoni Dobrowolski, who was put in the Auschwitz concentration camp because he defied Nazi orders not to teach young Poles, has died. He was 108 and was the oldest known survivor of that World War II Nazi death camp.

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The Salt
2:36 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Docs Say Choose Organic Food To Reduce Kids' Exposure To Pesticides

Parents now have more advice to consider when it comes to choosing organic foods. Here, Theo Shriver, 6, weighs organic produce at the Puget Consumers Co-op in Seattle.
Elaine Thompson AP

For the first time, the nation's pediatricians are wading into the controversy over whether organic food is better for you – and they're coming down on the side of parents who say it is, at least in part.

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Movie Interviews
2:15 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Ava DuVernay: A New Director, After Changing Course

Ava DuVernay also directed the documentary My Mic Sounds Nice: The Truth About Women in Hip Hop.
Liz O. Baylen Contour by Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:59 pm

In January, Ava DuVernay became the first African-American woman to win Sundance's best directing award for her second feature-length film, Middle of Nowhere. The film is about a young black woman named Ruby, who puts her life and dreams of going to medical school on hold while her husband is in prison.

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Mental Health
1:37 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Psychiatrists Shift Focus To Drugs, Not Talk Therapy

The American Psychiatric Association defines a psychiatrist as a medical doctor who conducts psychotherapy and prescribes medications and other medical treatments. With recent developments in the pharmaceutical and insurance industries, the definition of the practice appears to be shifting.

Politics
1:26 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Life After Running For President, And Losing

Former South Dakota Sen. George McGovern died Sunday at the age of 90. A liberal icon, he made two failed bids for president, but remained active and worked for several organizations battling world hunger. NPR's Ron Elving and Jill Callison of The Argus Leader discuss McGovern's politics and legacy.

Presidential Race
1:22 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Iran Looms Over Candidates' Foreign Policy Debate

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 8:46 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan, in Washington. The Middle East presents a series of challenges for whomever wins on November 6th: immediate problems in Libya and Syria, a seemingly eternal problem with Israel and the Palestinians, but maybe the biggest problem: the looming crisis with Iran.

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Pop Culture
12:59 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

From 'Groovy' To 'Slacks,' The Words That Date You

When jeans are too heavy and shorts are too, well, short, do you reach for pants, or for slacks?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 12:22 pm

When Chicago Tribune columnist Mary Schmich used the word "slacks" in a recent column, a reader commented: "Slacks? How old are you?"

"I was describing a young man, a college guy," Schmich tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I was trying to point out that he wasn't wearing jeans, that he wasn't sloppy, that he wasn't inordinately well-dressed for a guy in college," she says. "And so I used the word 'slacks.' "

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The Two-Way
12:37 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

VIDEO: A Teacher Wins A Dance Battle With An Irish Jig

A teacher dancing a jig.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon March 11, 2013 5:28 pm

We'll get back to our regularly scheduled news in just a bit. But first we wanted to show you this little fun video getting attention on Reddit today. It's of a teacher schooling his kids with an old school move that wows the students (warning: It's loud!):

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Africa
12:33 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Will The '24-Hour City' Of Cairo Call It A Night?

Nighttime shoppers pause to look at a display at Cairo's Ataba market in May 2011. The government says shops must close earlier in order to save scarce electricity, but many Cairo residents are complaining.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:54 pm

When the sun goes down, Cairo bursts to life. Men play backgammon and smoke water pipes. Young fashionistas meet friends for midnight coffees. Families go shopping with small kids in tow.

Life in the Egyptian capital is lived at night. Last year, one study rated Cairo the "most 24-hour city" in the world. New York City trailed far behind at No. 32.

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Business
12:08 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

Can U.S. Still Lead In Economic And 'Soft' Power?

A Ford Focus on the assembly line in Wayne, Mich. "We have a lot going for us; we've got our problems, but others have problems that are as bad or worse," says Nariman Behravesh, chief economist at IHS Global Insight.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 1:28 pm

At Monday night's foreign policy debate, the first round of questions for the presidential candidates will involve "America's role in the world."

The answers from President Obama and former Gov. Mitt Romney likely will focus on military readiness and anti-terrorism efforts. That's what most Americans would expect to hear, given that their country has been involved continuously in overseas combat since the terrorist attacks of 2001.

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Shots - Health News
11:55 am
Mon October 22, 2012

HIV Finding Opens New Path For Vaccine Research

The HIV-1 virus cultivated with human lymphocytes.
C. Goldsmith, P. Feorino, E. L. Palmer, W. R. McManus CDC Public Health Image Library

Researchers in South Africa have learned something new about how antibodies fight off HIV in research that could advance the quest to develop a vaccine against the virus.

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Presidential Race
11:48 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Debates and Debauchery: Drinking Games In 2012

Bar patrons watch the Oct. 3 presidential debate at Bullfeathers, a bar a short distance from the U.S. Capitol. Drinking and debate-watching often go hand in hand — to the point where drinking games have been developed around watching the debates.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:32 pm

Here's a new idea for a Presidential Debate Drinking Game: Every time someone says "Presidential Debate Drinking Game" today, take a drink. Just kidding.

But drinking games have become a familiar part of the American political landscape — like buttons, bunting and bumper stickers. Where there are political rallies, there are protesting groups. Where there are campaign speeches, there are fact checking teams. And where there are presidential candidates' debates, there are drinking games.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Italy Finds Scientists Guilty Of Manslaughter For 2009 Earthquake Forecast

One of the indicted, Bernardo De Bernardinis, who was deputy chief of Italy's Civil Protection Department, reacts during a his trial.
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

Six Italian scientists have been sentenced to six years in prison for what a judge said was a faulty forecast of the 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila.

The BBC reports that prosecutors said the scientists, who work for the National Commission for the Forecast and Prevention of Major Risks, "gave a falsely reassuring statement before the quake, while the defense maintained there was no way to predict major quakes."

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Music Reviews
11:35 am
Mon October 22, 2012

The Big Man Behind 'Shake, Rattle And Roll'

No figure in the history of rock 'n' roll is more incongruous than Big Joe Turner.
Heinrich Klaffs Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:59 pm

Big Joe Turner's hardest-hitting singles have been collected on a new compilation, titled Big Joe Turner Rocks.

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The Two-Way
10:36 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Russell Means, Indian Activist And Actor, Dies

Russell Means, left, talks to media in 1973 in the village of Wounded Knee, South Dakota.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:48 pm

Russell Means, who was best known for his movie roles and his unrelenting and oftentimes controversial protests in favor of Native Americans, died this morning at his ranch in Porcupine, S.D.

Means starred in a number of Hollywood films including the Last of the Mohicans. South Dakota Public Broadcasting's Charles Michael Ray filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Africa
10:15 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Is Rwanda Ready For The UN Security Council?

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 9:03 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. We will hear from a group of women who have all been diagnosed with the disease. We'll hear about how they're trying to rebuild their health and their lives. That conversation in just a few minutes.

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History
10:15 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Childhood Memories Of The Cuban Missile Crisis

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 9:03 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE, from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Rwanda has just been voted onto the U.N. Security Council for a two-year term. We will speak to the country's foreign minister about that and the country's ongoing efforts to move beyond its painful history of genocide and violence.

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It's All Politics
10:10 am
Mon October 22, 2012

The Foreign Policy Debate: What To Expect

The flag of Libya's National Transitional Council (second from right) flies outside the United Nations headquarters building in New York.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 2:48 pm

President Obama and Mitt Romney haven't spent much time talking about world affairs on the campaign trail, yet foreign policy can often define a presidency. America's next leader faces tough choices that range from redefining the U.S. role in the Middle East to managing the crucial relationship with China.

With that in mind, let's look at the topics most likely to come up in tonight's foreign policy debate — the candidates' final faceoff — in Boca Raton, Fla., and how international issues will shape the next administration.

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The Two-Way
9:37 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Castro Brushes Off Death Rumors, Proves He's Still Alive With Pictures

Fidel Castro.
Granma

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 9:53 am

The lead story on the digital version of Cuba's communist newspaper Granma puts to rest the death rumors that have plagued Fidel Castro for weeks.

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Tonight, Obama, Romney Take On Foreign Policy In Third And Final Debate

Crew work to put finishing touches on the stage a day ahead of the third and final presidential debate at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

We've reached an important landmark in the presidential campaign: President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney face off tonight in the third and final presidential debate.

As was the case the last two times, the debate starts at 9 p.m. ET. This time, the venue is Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.

If you believe the snap polls, the first debate went to Romney, the second went to Obama, which means we have a 1-1 tie with just minutes to go in the fourth quarter. That is to say, we're just two weeks away from Nov. 6.

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Mon October 22, 2012

'Light From Darkness': Another Mass Shooting Rocks Wisconsin Suburbs

Police personnel work outside the Azana Salon and Spa where three people were killed and four others wounded after a mass shooting on Sunday in Brookfield, Wisconsin.
Jeffrey Phelps Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 12:30 pm

Within two months, two Wisconsin suburbs have been rocked by mass shootings.

What we know so far about yesterday's shooting in Brookfield, Wis., is that a 45-year-old man allegedly walked into Azana Salon & Spa and opened fire, killing three women and injuring four.

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports that the alleged shooter, Radcliffe F. Haughton, was found dead inside the spa. He apparently committed suicide.

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Presidential Race
7:11 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Candidates' Plans For U.S. Military At Home, Abroad

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we just heard, the candidates have already said a lot about foreign policy, but they have not necessarily addressed every question. Tom Ricks has been thinking about a subject that lurks somewhere beneath almost all discussions about global hotspots. Ricks has covered the U.S. military for the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and in many books. His most recent work, "The Generals," examines top military officers in recent history and their grasp of strategy.

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Science
7:11 am
Mon October 22, 2012

Amateur 'Planet Hunters' Find One With Four Suns

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now is the moment in the program when I admit that I am a total Star Wars nut. Those of you with me, you might recall that Luke Skywalker's home planet of Tatooine enjoyed the warmth of not one but two suns. That dramatic scene, you remember Luke at dusk gazing at the weird peaceful sunset.

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