NPR News

Pages

Election 2012
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Will Hidden Issues Make The Agenda Next Term?

Host Michel Martin continues the conversation about the big issues missing on the campaign trail. Issues like crime, caregiving, poverty and climate change might affect millions of people, but they may not win a lot of votes. Martin speaks with a panel of journalists about whether these issues will enter the conversation over the next four years.

Your Money
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Angie's Tips On Avoiding Storm Scams

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:03 am

Severe weather could be headed for regions hard hit by superstorm Sandy, so many homeowners are scrambling to make repairs. The rush might make them vulnerable to so-called storm chasers — con artists posing as contractors. Host Michel Martin speaks with Angie Hicks, founder of the website Angie's List, for tips on how to avoid home repair scams.

Education
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Is The Nightly Homework Battle Worth It?

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:03 am

A lot of kids hate homework, and studies show they're getting more of it than ever. But experts are questioning whether the work is worth it. Host Michel Martin discusses the debate over homework with a panel of parents, including regular contributor Jolene Ivey, psychologist Kenneth Goldberg and educator Stephen Jones.

Election 2012
10:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

What Issues Did The Candidates Miss?

Voters have been bombarded by political ads, but some topics have gotten very little attention this election season. Host Michel Martin speaks with a panel of journalists about some of this election's hidden issues. She speaks with NPR's Marilyn Geewax, Jennifer Ludden, and David Schaper, as well as The Washington Post's Melinda Henneberger.

The Two-Way
9:47 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Car Bomb Kills At Least 26 In Baghdad Attack

An explosive-filled car was detonated near an Army base in Baghdad today, just as would-be recruits gathered outside. The explosion killed at least 26 people, reports The New York Times. Reuters puts the death toll at 31.

Reuters reports that this is "one of the worst attacks this year on [Iraq's] military."

The wire service adds:

Read more
Election 2012
9:44 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Update From Iowa: Voting, Recent Obama Rally

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:06 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Next, we go to Des Moines, Iowa where Sadhya Dirks of Iowa Public Radio joins us. Good morning.

SADHYA DIRKS, BYLINE: Morning.

MONTAGNE: And where did you start out this morning? I gather it wasn't Des Moines.

DIRKS: I was in a suburb of Des Moines. It's a more conservative part of Des Moines. It's Johnston, Iowa and I was at the Evangelical Free Church there, just talking to some voters and seeing what the turnout was like.

MONTAGNE: And what was it?

Read more
Shots - Health News
9:38 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Depression And Health Spending Go Together

Among common health problems, depression was linked to the highest increase in annual spending by employers' on workers' health care.
iStockphoto.com

Depression is the most costly among 10 common risk factors linked to higher health spending on employees, according to a new study drawn from the experience at seven companies.

The analysis, published in the journal Health Affairs, found that these factors — which also included obesity, high blood sugar and high blood pressure — were associated with nearly a quarter of the money spent on the health care of more than 92,000 workers.

Read more
Election 2012
9:38 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voting In Wisconsin: New Rules Make It Easier

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Republican Vice Presidential Candidate Paul Ryan cast his vote in his home state of Wisconsin this morning. To learn more about voting in that battleground state on this Election Day, we reached Shawn Johnson of Wisconsin Public Radio. He's in the town of Middleton, just outside the state capital, Madison. Good morning.

SHAWN JOHNSON, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Well, tell us a little about Middleton - partly what the scene is there, but also what kind of place is it?

Read more
Election 2012
9:03 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Ohio And Florida: Checking In With Two Key States

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. People have been joking for weeks that the candidates are actually running for president of Ohio. That's how vital the state is, but here's a reminder about the electoral map. It is at least theoretically possible for either candidate to lose Ohio and still reach 270 electoral votes by winning some combination of other states. Many of those combinations include Florida.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:23 am
Tue November 6, 2012

PHOTO: Mitt And Ann Romney Cast Their Ballots In Massachusetts

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and wife Ann Romney vote in Belmont, Mass., on Tuesday.
Charles Dharapak AP

The Republican presidential nominee Gov. Mitt Romney and his wife Ann cast their ballots near their home in Belmont, Mass. this morning.

Garrett Jackson, Romney's assistant, has been keeping a close record on Twitter of Romney's Election Day movements.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:02 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Evacuation Ordered In Brick, New Jersey Ahead Of Intense Nor'Easter

A satellite image of the clouds and storms over the United States.
NOAA

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 12:03 pm

There is no good news for New Jersey this morning. Already struggling to clean up from the mess left behind by Superstorm Sandy, an intense winter storm is on its way.

In fact, officials have already ordered a mandatory evacuation for residents living in the low-lying areas of Brick, New Jersey.

Read more
Election 2012
7:51 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Update From Fla.: Poised For Challenges

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

It's at least theoretically possible for either candidate to lose the vital state of Ohio and still reach 270 electoral votes by winning some combination of other states. Many of those combinations include Florida — infamous for voting irregularities in 2000.

Election 2012
7:45 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Update From N.H.: Early Start, New ID Law

Renee Montagne talks to Josh Rogers of New Hampshire Public Radio about voting in rural and urban parts of the state. Election Day starts early, at 5 a.m., in much of the state, and there's a new voter ID law.

Presidential Race
7:38 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Update From Ohio: Ballot Dispute

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Ohio is possibly the most important state in this presidential race. A challenge over early voting there has turned into a dispute over provisional ballots.

The Two-Way
7:37 am
Tue November 6, 2012

In The Rockaways, People Were Voting In The Dark

Debris lay in front of homes in a Rockaway neighborhood of the borough of Queens, New York, on Monday. The Manhattan skyline is seen in the background. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:32 am

"Here in the rockaways, people are voting in the dark. There are no lights, there is no heat."

That's how NPR's Robert Smith described the situation in the Rockaways, which is in one of the boroughs hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy in New York.

"There was supposed to be a generator running to run this entire polling place but when poll workers got there in the morning, they discovered it had no fuel," Robert told our Newscast unit.

Read more
It's All Politics
7:16 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voting Queue Etiquette: Hey, Buddy, That's Out Of Line!

South Floridians stood in long lines Sunday during the last day of early voting in Miami.
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 9:17 am

For most of us, Election Day marks a welcome end to months of relentless political ads and partisan bickering. You show up at your polling place, run the gantlet of sign-wielding campaign volunteers, and join your fellow Americans in long lines that inch toward the voting booth.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:08 am
Tue November 6, 2012

It's Election Day: 10 Headlines That Tell Today's Story

A woman is accompanied by her dog as she casts her vote on in South Philadelphia, Pa.
Jessica Kourkounis Getty Images

It's finally here! It's Election Day. After months of campaigning and some $2 billion spent by both campaigns, it means political junkies will finally get some answers and those who aren't too enamored with Washington, will stop seeing ads on TV.

With that, here are 10 headlines that tell today's story:

Read more
Election 2012
6:46 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Sandy Likely To Affect New York Voter Turnout

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

The triumph in some parts of the country this morning is that people are able to vote at all. Just over a week after Hurricane Sandy slammed ashore, people are voting today in New Jersey.

And in New York City, NPR's Robert Smith is in the Borough of Queens, part of New York City. He's on the line. Robert, what have you seen today?

Read more
Around the Nation
6:30 am
Tue November 6, 2012

N.J. Gov. Christie Chats With 'The Boss'

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie finally met his state's favorite son. He attended more than 100 Bruce Springsteen concerts without meeting the devoted Democrat. But after the Republican governor toured storm damage with President Obama, the two embraced. Campaigning with Springsteen, the president later put the two men on the phone, matching the Boss with the governor who once sang Springsteen music in a TV appearance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THUNDER ROAD")

Around the Nation
6:20 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Boca Raton's Mayor Wants A Spelling Change

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When the Florida city of Boca Raton hosted the last presidential debate, even the previous debate's moderator mispronounced it. Outsiders do tend to call it Boca Raton, like baton, possibly because it dropped the E on the end decades ago. Now the mayor wants the E back in the name. She joked to the South Florida Sun Sentinel: We'll put you in jail like Al Capone if you don't say it like Boca Raton. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

It's All Politics
6:03 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Guide For The Day: An Election Day Timeline

Voters fill out their ballots on the first day of early voting on Oct. 27 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The finish line is in sight as voters make their final decisions on Election Day. Here's a guide to key times of the day across the nation. Stay with NPR throughout the day as we follow the presidential race and key battles that will determine control of the House and Senate.

Join NPR to hear live coverage, which begins at 8 p.m. EST on NPR.org and many member stations.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:01 am
Tue November 6, 2012

The Battle For Congress: Senate And House Races To Watch

Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., shakes hands with Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren at their Oct. 1 debate in Lowell, Mass. The race is one of a handful of contests that could determine party control of the Senate.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 6:02 pm

For Republicans itching to regain control of the Senate, Tuesday's election presents a rare opportunity. Only 10 GOP incumbents are on the ballot, compared with nearly two dozen Democrats and independents who caucus with them.

That means the magic number for Republicans is low. They need only a net gain of three or four seats to take over the Senate — and, assuming they keep the U.S. House of Representatives, consolidate their influence on Capitol Hill. Democrats need to pick up 25 seats to seize the House, a goal that political analysts consider all but out of reach.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

GOP Eyes Gains As Voters In 11 States Pick Governors

New Hampshire gubernatorial candidates Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Ovide Lamontagne talk before their Oct. 4 debate in Henniker, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 8:03 pm

Voters in 11 states will pick their governors tonight, and Republicans appear on track to increase their numbers by at least one, with the potential to extend their hold to more than two-thirds of the nation's top state offices.

Eight of the gubernatorial seats up for grabs are now held by Democrats; three are in Republican hands. Republicans currently hold 29 governorships, Democrats have 20, and Rhode Island's Gov. Lincoln Chafee is an Independent.

Read more
It's All Politics
5:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voters To Settle Tight And Turbulent Presidential Battle

Supporters attend a Mitt Romney rally Monday in Columbus, Ohio.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:08 am

As Americans go to the polls, one of the closest presidential races in years may be determined by a state in the Midwest and a hurricane named Sandy.

After a campaign that has cost some $6 billion, the two candidates are in the same place they started: with President Obama a smidgen ahead of challenger Mitt Romney, so close that differences are in most cases statistically insignificant.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:41 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Sandy Victims Struggle To Find Temporary Housing

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New York's Mayor Bloomberg has hired a former FEMA official with experience in Hurricane Katrina to direct the city's housing recovery. NPR's Martin Kaste reports it's another sign of the seriousness of the housing shortage caused by the storm.

Read more
NPR Story
4:36 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Obama Spends Election Day In Chicago

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: And I'm Scott Horsley, traveling with the Obama campaign. Actually, the president's campaign travel is finished. Mr. Obama spent the night at his own home in Chicago. Today's plans call for some TV and radio interviews and maybe a game of basketball with some friends. Mr. Obama's last reelection rally came last night in Iowa, where 20,000 people gathered just outside the caucus headquarters where he launched his first presidential campaign more than five years ago.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

Read more
NPR Story
4:36 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Presidential Vote May Outshine State Ballot Initiatives

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Many Americans will spend extra time at the polls today, not just choosing candidates but also making law. They will vote on a variety of state ballot initiatives, which Josh Goodman of the Pew Center on the States is tracking.

I've printed out here a list of ballot initiatives in various states. And it's more than a page long. It's a ridiculous number. The Oregon Gillnet Fishing Initiative, the Utah Military Property Tax Exemption Amendment, Constitutional Amendment B 2012. We could go on for quite some time. This is quite a list.

Read more
NPR Story
4:36 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Floor Makeover Takes 3 Weeks, 250,000 Pennies

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: Pinching Pennies.

In Garfield, Pennsylvania, the owner of a tattoo shop wanted to spruce up her floors. She could have gone with a nice tile or parquet.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Instead, Mel Angst of the Artisan Tattoo and Coffee Gallery went with pennies - 250,000. She recruited some volunteers, and spent three weeks painstakingly gluing pennies to the floor.

Read more
Statewide Races
2:20 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Florida's New Battleground: The State Supreme Court

Speaking at the University of Florida in Gainesville, state Supreme Court Justice Fred Lewis said Florida's courts should be independent. Lewis is one of three justices fighting to keep his seat.
Matt Stamey Gainesville Sun /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

In Florida, Supreme Court justices are nominated by a commission and appointed by the governor. Every six years, they're up for retention. Voters decide whether to keep them on the bench or let them go.

Since the system was put in place in the 1970s, retention votes have been pro forma affairs, with justices doing little fundraising or campaigning.

But this year is different.

Read more
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond
2:19 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Norfolk, Va., Puts Flooding Survival Plan To The Test

Motorists drive through standing water at an intersection flooded from the remnants of Tropical Storm Ida in the Ocean View area of Norfolk, Va., in November 2009.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 11:18 am

Superstorm Sandy got officials in New York and New Jersey talking about how to prevent flooding in a time of global warming and sea level rise.

But the place on the East Coast that's most vulnerable to flooding is several hundred miles south, around Norfolk, Va. — and Norfolk has already spent many years studying how to survive the rising waters.

Scientists say what Norfolk has learned is especially important in light of new research showing that the coastline from North Carolina to Boston will experience even more sea level rise than other areas.

Read more

Pages