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5:29 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 6:08 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with advertisers liking Facebook.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Facebook says its mobile advertising business nearly doubled from the third to fourth quarter of 2012. As a whole, the company's ad business grew at its fastest rate since it went public last May.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Syria Accuses Israel Of Bombing Its Military Facility

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 11:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's sort through what we know and do not know about Israel's reported airstrike on Syria. Syrian officials, the government of Bashar al-Assad, have affirmed that Israeli warplanes struck, although we have conflicting reports about what the target was. We're going to work through the information with NPR's Jerusalem correspondent, Larry Abramson. Hi, Larry.

LARRY ABRAMSON, BYLINE: Hi there, Steve.

INSKEEP: What do you know, and how do you know it?

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Planet Money
4:03 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Should Gun Owners Have To Buy Liability Insurance?

George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on

Note: We originally published a version of this post a few weeks ago. We are republishing it now to coincide with our story airing today on Morning Edition.

All kinds of proposals to reduce gun violence have been floated recently. One idea that has gotten the attention of economists is liability insurance. Most states require car owners to have liability insurance to cover damages their vehicles cause to others; some economists think we should require the same of gun owners.

We reached out to a few economists to get their thoughts.

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Business
3:08 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Boeing Contract Offer Could Prompt Engineers Strike

A Boeing 787 under construction inside a production facility at a Boeing plant in Everett, Wash., last year.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 1:18 pm

Boeing is scrambling to figure out why batteries malfunctioned on its 787, prompting officials to ground the airplane this month. And at a time when Boeing most needs its skilled engineers, they're weighing a possible strike. Union leaders are considering the company's final contract offer.

The standoff between Boeing and about 23,000 engineers and technicians — mostly in the Seattle region — has been brewing for months. Dozens of them recently packed a union hall south of Seattle for training in how to run a picket line.

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It's All Politics
2:18 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Cabinet Picks Show A Shift In How U.S. Wages War

President Obama shakes hands with his nominee to head the Defense Department, former Sen. Chuck Hagel, at the White House on Jan. 7. John Brennan, Obama's choice for director of the CIA, looks on.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 7:34 am

Chuck Hagel, who spent more than a decade in the Senate asking witnesses questions at hearings, will be the one answering them Thursday as his confirmation hearing to be secretary of defense begins.

His hearing follows that of Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., who was confirmed this week to be secretary of state.

Kerry and Hagel have a prominent biographical detail in common: service in Vietnam.

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Sports
2:17 am
Thu January 31, 2013

How Do You Solve A Problem Like Colin Kaepernick?

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick throws before the NFC Championship game against the Atlanta Falcons on Jan. 20.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 6:55 pm

There's always a question surrounding San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick. Years ago, people wondered whether the talented athlete would be good enough to start in college.

Then there was the question of what role he would play in the NFL. And after the 49ers took him, fans questioned whether he could throw enough to be more than a backup.

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Music Interviews
1:03 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Ben Harper And Charlie Musselwhite Get Muddy

Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite's new collaborative album is titled Get Up!
Danny Clinch Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 12:12 pm

Ben Harper grew up roaming the aisles and restoring guitars at his family's music store, the Claremont Folk Music Center. Going on its 60th year of business, the storefront in Southern California is where Harper first discovered the harmonica playing of blues legend Charlie Musselwhite.

"We had Charlie's records stacked high at my family's store and at my house," Harper tells NPR's Steve Inskeep.

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The Record
7:03 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Patty Andrews, Leader Of The Andrews Sisters, Dies

The Andrews Sisters (from left, Maxene, Patty and LaVerne) in the 1940s. Patty was the star of the sibling act.
GAB Archive/Redferns Getty Images

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 12:40 pm

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The Two-Way
5:40 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Middle-Aged Breadwinners Become Part Of The 'Sandwich Generation'

Originally published on Fri February 1, 2013 10:54 am

If you're the economic pillar for both your kids and your parents, you're not alone.

One-in-seven adults financially support both their parents and their kids at the same time, according to a Pew Research study released Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
5:33 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Through Ad Campaign, Muslim Activists Want To Redefine 'Jihad'

One of the ads running in the Washington, D.C. metro.
CAIR-Chicago

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 8:30 am

In an effort to "reclaim" the word jihad, Muslim activists launched a new ad campaign in the nation's capital this week. Commuters in the Washington, D.C., subway system will start seeing posters stamped with the "#My Jihad" hashtag.

Each poster depicts a Muslim sharing their personal struggle: "my jihad: is to march on despite losing my son," and "my jihad: modesty is not weakness."

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Business
5:18 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Grounding Of 787s Creates Doubts About 'Business As Usual' At Boeing

Investigators are still looking into the cause of fires and overheating aboard Boeing's new 787s.
Shizuo Kambayashi AP

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:39 pm

Boeing generated more cash than expected last year and reclaimed the top spot over rival Airbus as the world's biggest airplane maker.

But all that was overshadowed by the fact that its entire fleet of 787s is grounded after batteries on two of its planes either overheated or caught fire.

"For 2013, our first order of business, obviously, is getting the 787 back into service," Boeing CEO James McNerney says.

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It's All Politics
5:12 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

In Immigration Debate, 'Undocumented' Vs. 'Illegal' Is More Than Just Semantics

On Monday, we pointed to how the bipartisan Gang of Eight senators mostly avoided the term "illegal immigrant" in the language of their immigration reform plan.

It looks like President Obama did the same in his address on the issue the next day.

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Music News
4:51 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Remembering Butch Morris, The Man Who Conducted Improvisation

Butch Morris leads a conduction at the 2007 Skopje Jazz Festival in Macedonia.
Samir Ljuma for NPR

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:18 pm

The jazz musician Butch Morris was beloved by his fellow musicians and acclaimed by critics and fans for his ability to conduct improvisation. While that may sound like a contradiction, Morris pulled it off — with jazz musicians and symphony orchestras around the world.

A resident of New York City, he died yesterday in a Brooklyn hospital of cancer. He was 65 years old.

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Shots - Health News
4:48 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Gut Microbes May Play Deadly Role In Malnutrition

Researchers followed 300 sets of twins in Malawi for the first three years of their life. In many cases, only one twin developed severe malnutrition, while the other remained healthier.
Photograph courtesy of Tanya Yatsunenko

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 9:44 am

There's a part of our body that's only now getting mapped: the trillions of microbes, mostly bacteria, that live in our guts.

Some scientists describe this community as a previously unnoticed vital organ. It appears to play a role in how quickly we gain weight and how well we fight off disease.

A study published in the journal Science suggests that changes in this community of microbes also may cause kwashiorkor, a kind of deadly malnutrition.

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It's All Politics
4:46 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

LaPierre Fights To Stop The 'Nightmare' Of Background Checks

Wayne LaPierre, executive vice president and CEO of the National Rifle Association, testifies while NRA President David Keene listens during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on gun violence Wednesday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

The halting testimony of former Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, gravely injured in a mass shooting two years ago, may have provided the most gripping moments of the Senate's first gun control hearing this session.

But the star witness on Capitol Hill on Wednesday was Wayne LaPierre, the National Rifle Association's top lobbyist.

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The Two-Way
4:37 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Catholic Priests In Mexico Encourage Country To 'Forgive' Narco Killers

A screenshot of the short film Hermano Narco.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:41 pm

A group of priests in Mexico are delivering a controversial message: Mexicans should forgive their brothers and sisters, even those involved in the drug trade who may have killed their family members.

The message was delivered during a Sunday homily in Mexico City, but it was also delivered in a dramatic video making the rounds on the Internet.

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The Two-Way
4:24 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

From Timbuktu, Reports That Manuscripts Have Been Saved

A man attempts to salvage burnt manuscripts at the Ahmed Baba Institute in Timbuktu, Mali, on Tuesday. While some of the ancient manuscripts were destroyed by Islamist radicals, reports indicate that most were hidden and therefore survived.
Eric Feferberg AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:35 pm

Reports from Timbuktu, Mali, on Wednesday indicate that most of the ancient manuscripts at a famed library may have been saved by residents before Islamist radicals had the chance to burn them.

"I can say that the vast majority of the collections appear from our reports not to have been destroyed, damaged or harmed in any way," Shamil Jeppie, an expert on the documents who teaches at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, told Reuters.

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The Salt
4:08 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

International Culinary Competition Gold Eludes Americans Again

The plating of Team USA's Irish beef dish was based on Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater house.
Courtesy of Bonjwing Lee

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 11:29 am

Americans may have perfected food television and exported our fast-food tastes around the world, but we still haven't made it to the podium in the so-called Olympics of Cooking. The prestigious Bocuse d'Or chef competition, held in Lyon, France, on Tuesday and Wednesday, saw Team USA unable to break its dry streak, with a seventh-place finish behind winners France, Denmark and Japan.

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Shots - Health News
4:03 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Why Some Families Won't Qualify For Subsidized Health Insurance

iStockphoto.com

Quite a few families with expensive job-based health insurance may be ineligible for federal subsidies to help them buy cheaper coverage through new online insurance markets, under final rules released Wednesday by the Internal Revenue Service.

The two rules, published by the Treasury Department here and here, uphold earlier proposals outlining what is considered affordable, employer-sponsored coverage.

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The Two-Way
3:06 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

South Africa's First Black Billionaire Pledges To Donate Half His Wealth

Patrice Motsepe in 2010.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:41 pm

If you were looking for good news, here's a bit of it from South Africa: Patrice Motsepe, the country's first black billionaire, announced today that he will donate half his fortune in order to help the poor.

Reuters reports:

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Bellevue Hospital's Slow Comeback After Superstorm Sandy

When Superstorm Sandy came ashore, Bellevue Hospital was quickly submerged. Inspectors from the Federal Emergency Management Agency marked the flood line in the basement with orange tape or spray paint. In some areas, water was 14 feet deep.
Fred Mogul NPR

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:18 pm

When a ferry crashed in lower Manhattan earlier this month, ambulances took dozens of people to hospitals around the island.

Bellevue Hospital took in 31 passengers, but they all had minor injuries. The most seriously hurt patients from the crash went elsewhere. Dr. Suzi Vassallo said that's because Bellevue still can't handle serious traumatic injuries.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Israel Bombs Military Target Outside Damascus, Syria Says

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:38 pm

Israel's air force bombed a military facility in western Syria, the Syrian media said Wednesday, a development that could further complicate the already volatile conditions in the region.

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Books
2:51 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Sotomayor's Memoir Already A Best-Seller

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 2:27 pm

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's memoir is riding high, topping the New York Times best-seller list in its first week of sales.

My Beloved World, Sotomayor's account of her path from the tenements of the Bronx to the U.S. Supreme Court, is on track to outdistance even the best-selling books of other justices.

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Music Reviews
2:27 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

A 1969 Bootleg Unearths Miles Davis' 'Lost' Quintet

Miles Davis' Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 is a compilation of previously unreleased material performed by a short-lived incarnation of his touring band.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 5:18 pm

After a slew of multidisc sets devoted to key points in the career of Miles Davis, you'd think Columbia Records would have unearthed every speck of consequential music by now. But not quite.

This week, Columbia brings out Live in Europe 1969: The Bootleg Series Vol. 2 — a three-CD, one-DVD set devoted to the jazz maverick's "lost" quintet, his touring band from 1969.

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The Two-Way
1:54 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Report From Homeland Security Details 'Commonalities' In Mass Shootings

Mourners create a memorial at the fountain of the Aurora Municipal Center after a prayer vigil Sunday for the 12 victims of Friday's mass shooting at the Century 16 movie theater.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Back in November, one of the Homeland Security's intelligence analysis centers in New Jersey was tasked with finding "commonalities" of mass shootings in the United States.

Today, the website Public Intelligence received an unclassified version of that report through a Freedom of Information Act request. The New Jersey "Fusion Center" looked at 29 mass shootings in the United States since 1999.

The findings:

-- Nearly half of the shootings happened at a workplace.

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World
1:41 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Israeli Election Rekindles Debate Over Military Service

Ultra-Orthodox Jews are not required to perform military service in Israel, and the issue is subject to intense debate following the country's election last week. Here, ultra-Orthodox men sign up for alternate civilian service earlier this month.
Baz Ratner Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun February 3, 2013 11:51 am

The rise of a new Israeli political party after last week's elections has set the stage for renewed conflict over the country's military draft.

That new party, Yesh Atid, or "There is a Future," campaigned on a promise to draft thousands of ultra-Orthodox students who are currently exempt from military service.

And with the number of ultra-Orthodox students in Israel on the rise given the community's high birth rates, this longstanding debate has become a critical post-election issue.

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Around the Nation
1:41 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Boy Scouts' Repeal Of Gay Ban Mirrors Its Approach To Racial Integration

The Supreme Court upheld the Boy Scouts' right to discriminate in 2000, but the issue roiled for years after. Scott Cozza (right) leads a protest outside the National Council Conference of the Boy Scouts of America in Philadelphia in 2003.
Mark Stehle AP

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 6:10 pm

As Boy Scouts of America mull over whether to allow gay members to openly join, their approach might mirror the leave-it-to-the-locals tack the organization once took in deciding how to tackle the issue of desegregating its Scout troops.

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It's All Politics
1:40 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Lifting Boy Scout Ban On Gays: One Legal Perspective

A statue of a Boy Scout stands in front of the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas.
LM Otero AP

The Boy Scouts of America as early as next week may drop its ban against openly gay members and leaders, just a dozen years after it successfully took its fight to maintain the policy all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It would mark a seismic shift for the organization, which counts more than 3.3 million youth members who participate in troops largely sponsored by civic and church groups.

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Mental Health
1:23 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

Balancing Work, Medication And Mental Illness

With a proper balance of medication and therapy, some people diagnosed with mental illness can succeed in the workplace.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 5:04 pm

Thirty years ago, when Elyn Saks was diagnosed with schizophrenia, her doctors told her she would never be able to hold a job.

"The idea was that I should lower my expectations," she tells NPR's Neal Conan. "I was advised to be a cashier for a year or two and then think about another job or possibly going back to school."

She didn't listen.

Despite hospitalization, years of psychoanalysis and continued delusions, Saks discovered that work was essential to managing her psychosis. She is now a professor at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law.

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Asia
1:20 pm
Wed January 30, 2013

The Role For The U.S. In The East China Sea Dispute

The Senkaku Islands, as they are called in Japan, sit in a strategic location between Okinawa and Taiwan.
Matt Stiles/NPR

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 2:57 pm

The dispute between Japan and China over small islands in the East China Sea is escalating. The two nations first dispatched unarmed vessels to stake their claims, then patrol boats, and then, unarmed aircraft.

Most recently, both countries sent fighter jets to the islands — known as the Senkaku in Japan, and the Diaoyu in China. The islands are uninhabited, but sit in a strategic location between Japan and Taiwan.

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