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2:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Brazil's Evangelicals A Growing Force In Prayer, Politics

Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013.
Nelson Antoine AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:32 pm

Pope Francis arrives Monday evening in Rio de Janeiro for a weeklong visit celebrating World Youth Day. Hundreds of thousands of Catholics have made the pilgrimage to see the Argentine-born pontiff, and he is expected to receive a rapturous welcome.

Still, Pope Francis's visit comes at a delicate time for the church in Brazil. Catholicism — the nation's main religion — is facing a huge challenge from evangelicals.

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The Salt
2:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:30 am

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
2:32 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Little Bighorn Tour Guide Brings Battle To Life

Seasonal Ranger Mike Donahue (right) discuses the Battle of Little Bighorn with Jon Jones atop Custer Hill.
Jim Kent NPR

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:04 am

On a scorching hot summer afternoon along the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, seasonal ranger Mike Donahue brings the historical Battle of Little Bighorn to life with remarkable enthusiasm and passion.

At a recent presentation, Donahue welcomes a crowd to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. "Why did it happen in the first place?" he asks during the presentation. "Because you had two peoples that really didn't understand or appreciate one another very well."

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Shots - Health News
2:31 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Staying Healthy May Mean Learning To Love Our Microbiomes

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:07 pm

Not so long ago, most people thought that the only good microbe was a dead microbe.

But then scientists started to realize that even though some bugs can make us sick and even kill us, most don't.

In fact, in the past decade attitudes about the bacteria, fungi, viruses and other microbes living all over our bodies has almost completely turned around. Now scientists say that not only are those microbes often not harmful, we can't live without them.

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Parallels
2:17 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Would Brits Throw Out Royals With Baby's Bathwater?

Cards depicting the 'royal baby' either as a boy or a girl, specially made by a games company as a publicity stunt are pictured, backdropped by members of the media waiting across the St. Mary's Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London on July 11, 2013.
Lefteris Pitarakis AP

"Royal Baby Fever" is gripping Britain.

So say the breathless TV pundits gathered from round the world to report the infant's arrival.

Is it true?

An Ipsos Mori poll published this week found the Royal Family's certainly enjoying a golden age, after rebounding from the disasters of the 1990s — including the death of Princess Diana.

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Law
5:21 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

The Voting Rights Act: Hard-Won Gains, An Uncertain Future

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in Washington on Feb. 27, 2013, to listen to oral arguments in the Shelby County, Ala., v. Holder voting rights case. In June, the court struck down a key provision of the law that established a formula to identify states that may require extra scrutiny by the Justice Department regarding voting procedures.
Evan Vucci AP

Access to the polls has not always been assured for all Americans, and before the Voting Rights Act of 1965, many were subjected to so-called literacy tests and poll tax.

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Health
3:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Studies Show Evidence Of Falling Dementia Rates Abroad

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 4:58 pm

As NPR reported in May, the number of Americans with Alzheimer's disease is expected to triple by 2050. But studies published in the last two weeks based in European countries show signs of declining dementia.

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News
3:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Military Sexual Assault Bill Would Reassign Authority

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand speaks to reporters Tuesday. With her Sens. Rand Paul, R-Ky., Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., Ted Cruz, R-Texas, Barbara Boxer, D-Calif. and Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, all of whom have endorsed her bill on military sexual assault.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 4:58 pm

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., is fighting for her bill to curb sexual assaults in the military. Her measure would give independent military prosecutors, rather than commanders, the power to decide which cases should be tried in military court.

Military leaders fiercely oppose moving that authority outside the chain of command, arguing that commanders are responsible for the health and welfare of their soldiers. Removing their authority would undermine their ability to lead, they say.

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Music Interviews
3:59 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Hüsker Dü's Timekeeper Finds A Lost Paradise

Grant Hart has had an enigmatic career since his days drumming with the influential punk trio Hüsker Dü.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 4:58 pm

In the 1980's, few bands bridged the gap between hardcore punk and what would become alternative rock quite like Minnesota's Hüsker Dü.

The personalities in the trio, however, were not as harmonious, and their partnership dissolved before the decade's end. Guitarist Bob Mould went on to a successful recording career. Bassist Greg Norton dropped out of music and became a chef. And that leaves ... drummer Grant Hart.

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The Two-Way
2:12 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

Michigan Governor Doesn't Want Bailout For Detroit

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder (left) and Detroit's emergency manager Kevyn Orr address Detroit's bankruptcy filing at a news conference on Friday.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he's not expecting the federal government to offer a bailout for bankrupt Detroit and doesn't think it would be a good idea anyway.

Speaking on CBS' Face the Nation on Sunday, Snyder said of a Washington bailout of the Motor City: "I don't expect one."

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The Two-Way
12:25 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

The 100th Tour De France Wraps Up With A Win For The British

Race leader Chris Froome of Great Britain finishes Stage 20 of the 2013 Tour de France. The penultimate stage of the Tour put Froome ahead by 5 minutes and practically guarantees he finishes Sunday in Paris in the yellow jersey.
John Berry Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 5:04 am

The City of Light is, in fact, lighting up for an evening showdown on the final day of the Tour de France. In a break with tradition, the 21-stage cycling race is starting later than usual from Versailles and ending 83 miles later in Paris with 10 laps of a circuit up and down the Champs-Elysees.

Yet the winners of the 100th Tour de France were pretty much set on Saturday at the end of the 20th stage. For the second year in a row, a Brit is taking the coveted yellow jersey grand prize.

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The Two-Way
12:24 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

British Bask In Summer Of Sporting Triumphs

Something to cheer about: Scotland's Andy Murray (second from left) speaks with Britain's Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg and Prime Minister David Cameron (center) after winning the men's title at Wimbledon.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The stars are finally aligning for British sport.

Earlier this month, Andy Murray broke a seven-decade lockout for the British, picking up the men's title at Wimbledon in straight sets against six-time Grand Slam winner Novak Djokovic.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Pope's Visit To Brazil Seen As 'Triumphant Homecoming'

A Brazilian flag flies on Saturday near the podium which will receive Pope Francis on Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:25 pm

When Pope Francis arrives in Brazil on Monday, he'll begin a trip of firsts.

He's the first Latin American pope, and it will be his first trip abroad as pontiff. And he'll be visiting a country with more Catholics than any other.

Francis, who is gaining a reputation for his simple ways, is expected, The Miami Herald writes, to:

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The Two-Way
7:51 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Japan's Ruling Coalition Wins Control Of Upper House

Japanese Prime Minister and ruling Liberal Democratic Party leader Shinzo Abe delivers a campaign speech in Tokyo ahead of Sunday's polling.
Toshifumi Kitamura AFP/Getty Images

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's ruling coalition has won a decisive election victory, extending its control to the upper house of parliament and setting the stage for the country's first stable government in years.

Based on exit polls, national broadcaster NHK predicts that Abe's Liberal Democratic Party and its coalition partner, New Komeito, will take 71 seats, giving them a total of 130 seats, eight more than needed for a majority in the chamber.

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The Two-Way
7:06 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Belgian King Abdicates, Crown Prince Assumes Throne

Crown Prince Philippe of Belgium takes the oath on Sunday during a ceremony at the Chamber at the Federal Parliament in Brussels.
Yorick Jansens AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:21 pm

Belgium's Crown Prince Philippe has been sworn in as the country's seventh monarch, succeeding his father, Albert II, who abdicated on Sunday after a 20-year reign.

Albert, 79, resigned the throne on Sunday, citing ill health. He officially signed away his rights to the largely ceremonial post in the presence of Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo, who holds the real political party in Belgium, a 183-year-old constitutional monarchy.

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On Aging
6:44 am
Sun July 21, 2013

A Convert Travels To Catholic World Youth Day

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We're now going to hear from one of the young pilgrims traveling to Brazil to see the pope. Hannah Mayo lives in Charleston, S.C. She converted to Catholicism just a couple months ago.

MARTIN: She joins us from Charleston. Hannah, thanks so much for being here.

HANNAH MAYO: Thank you.

MARTIN: So I understand that you weren't actually planning on going to the World Youth Day in Brazil. But a few friends - new friends, perhaps in your new church, help make it possible?

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News
6:44 am
Sun July 21, 2013

'Rapturous' Reception Expected For Pope In Brazil

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Pope Francis is headed to Rio de Janeiro tomorrow for World Youth Day. It's actually a week-long gathering for young Catholics held every few years in a different part of the world. The event is meant to inspire and energize the faithful, and more than a million young pilgrims are expected to attend this year. Pope Francis is the first pope from Latin America and he's making his first papal visit overseas. It is to Latin America.

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News
6:44 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Author: Obama's Personal Take On Race Made Impact

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Another American who listened intently to President Obama's remarks Friday was linguist and commentator John McWhorter. He's written several books about race in America, including "Authentically Black: Essays for the Black Silent Majority." McWhorter says Mr. Obama's emphasis on the police and criminal justice hit an essential problem of black inequality in America.

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News
6:44 am
Sun July 21, 2013

The Politics Behind The President's Words

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For more on the political repercussions of the president's recent comments, we turn to NPR senior political correspondent Mara Liasson. Good morning, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: So, President Obama had been reluctant to talk about explicitly about race relations in this country up until now. What was it about this issue that drew him out in this way?

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U.S.
5:30 am
Sun July 21, 2013

A Woman Among Men: Female Firefighter Blazed A Trail

Judy Brewer was the country's first full-time female firefighter.
John Duricka AP

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 11:41 am

Arlington County, Va., wants more female firefighters. The fire department there has even set up a camp to inspire potential recruits. Donning helmets and matching camp shirts, teenage girls line up to watch a demonstration: A model room with furniture is ablaze.

Camper Tara Crosey says she came to camp in part because she "wanted to show that girls are as strong as boys and girls can do what boys can do."

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Environment
5:30 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Fighting Fire With Fire: Why Some Burns Are Good For Nature

An arborist from the Montana Conservation Corps works to clear pine trees from land in Centennial Valley, Mont.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 1:50 pm

Wildfires were once essential to the American West. Prairies and forests burned regularly, and those fires not only determined the mix of flora and fauna that made up the ecosystem, but they regenerated the land.

When people replaced wilderness with homes and ranches, they aggressively eliminated fire. But now, scientists are trying to bring fire back to the wilderness, to recreate what nature once did on its own.

One place they're doing this is Centennial Valley, in southwestern Montana.

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All Tech Considered
5:21 am
Sun July 21, 2013

High-End Stores Use Facial Recognition Tools To Spot VIPs

Hey, isn't that ...? New facial recognition software is designed to help store employees recognize celebrities like Mindy Kaling — and other bold-faced names.
Chelsea Lauren Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 2:33 pm

When a young Indian-American woman walked into the funky L.A. jewelry boutique Tarina Tarantino, store manager Lauren Twisselman thought she was just like any other customer. She didn't realize the woman was actress and writer Mindy Kaling.

"I hadn't watched The Office," Twisselman says. Kaling both wrote and appeared in the NBC hit.

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Code Switch
4:56 am
Sun July 21, 2013

Black Americans Welcome Obama's Entry To Race Discussion

A man holds up a sign at the "Justice for Trayvon" rally in downtown Chicago on Saturday.
Scott Eisen AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:41 am

As soon as he made his remarks on race Friday, President Obama was part of an intense conversation around the nation.

In dozens of cities across the country on Saturday, protesters held coordinated rallies and vigils over the not-guilty verdict in the shooting death of unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla. Many African-Americans insist that understanding the context for black distress over the Zimmerman verdict is key to honest discussions about race.

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Parallels
2:35 am
Sun July 21, 2013

India's Massive Challenge Of Feeding Every Poor Person

The Indian government's new food security plan would cover impoverished families like this one in the city of Allahabad.
Rajesh Kumar Singh AP

We've become familiar with the story of India's economic ascent and the creation of a large middle class. While that story is true, hundreds of millions of Indians have not been lifted out of extreme poverty.

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Politics
5:19 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Return To Iowa

Cyclists pass a grain elevator in The Des Moines Register's annual bike ride across Iowa in 2011. NPR correspondents are joining the ride this year and documenting the journey.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Join three NPR reporters as they explore the Iowa they didn't see on the presidential trail.

Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor will tour the state by bike this time around, as part of The Des Moines Register's 41st Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa, better known as RAGBRAI.

Follow their travels!

History
4:34 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Remembering The North's First Black Civil War Unit

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 4:13 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

One hundred and fifty years ago, the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry fought a historic battle in the Civil War. The unit was almost entirely African-American. They would have been called colored back then. The first such unit from the North to fight for the union. You might have seen their story depicted in the movie "Glory" with Denzel Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "GLORY")

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Author Interviews
4:10 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

'No Regrets': A Murder Mystery, Tangled In Life's Troubles

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:34 pm

South Florida has been irresistible for crime writers, among them Carl Hiaasen, Edna Buchanan and Harry Crews. Now John Dufresne, most famously the author of the novel Louisiana Power and Light, has joined that list with his first mystery novel.

No Regrets, Coyote is Dufresne's eighth novel, and it begins with the killing of an entire family in the fictional South Florida town of Eden. When the police get to the scene of the crime, they find a typed note, which they insist is a suicide letter.

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Space
4:09 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

One Small Step For Man, One Giant Lunar Park For The U.S.?

The moon, seen from the International Space Station, on July 31.
NASA

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:50 pm

Can astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's "giant leap for mankind" be permanently preserved? Two House Democrats want to do just that: They proposed a bill to create a national historic park for the Apollo 11 mission — on the moon. The legislation would designate a park on the moon to honor that first mission, as well as preserve artifacts from other lunar missions

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Book Reviews
3:38 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

You'll Want To Hang Up On These 'Secret Conversations'

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:34 pm

A country girl from Grabtown, N.C., Ava Gardner arrived in Hollywood in 1941 knowing she couldn't act but, gorgeous as she was, she never had to let that slow her down. Her beauty — which reportedly intimidated Elizabeth Taylor — won her not just film roles and studio-paid acting lessons, but the attentions of all-American boy Mickey Rooney, whom she married and divorced before she turned 21. She had a similarly brief union with bandleader Artie Shaw — she called those two her "starter husbands" — before a tempestuous, headline-making marriage to Frank Sinatra.

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The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Sat July 20, 2013

Six Men Jailed For Life In Rape Of Swiss Tourist In India

Indian policemen escort suspects in the rape case of a Swiss tourist to court in March. All six accused were sentenced to life on Saturday.
AFP/Getty Images

An Indian court has sentenced six men to life in prison in connection with the gang rape of a Swiss tourist in March.

The 39-year-old woman was raped as she and her husband were camping in India's central state of Madhya Pradesh.

As we reported back in March, police say the attackers tied up the man and raped the woman in his presence. The men then robbed the couple of cash, a laptop and cell phone.

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