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Talk of Iowa
4:20 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Backyard Ecosystems

Carsten Tolkmit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Join Talk of Iowa for a talk with Douglas Tallamy, Professor and Chair of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. He says “We need to change the way we interact with nature; it should not be segregated,” and that living with nature can be very rewarding. Tallamy says that Americans use plants that are mostly from Asia as decorations.  The result is a reduced biodiversity in the places we live, work, and farm.  Hear from Tallamy  about how we can connect habitats by reinstalling native plants.

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Legislative Day
3:26 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Bullying Bill Moving Forward, Funding and Cyber-bullying are Sticking Points

JLM Photography Flickr Creative Commons

Republican Governor Terry Branstad identified legislation to combat bullying as one of his top priorities for this legislative session.  However, a bill has stalled in the Iowa House, bogged down by 17 amendments.  Concerns have arisen in the Republican-controlled chamber over whether schools should be responsible for bullying that occurs online or off school grounds.  In his weekly news conference Monday, Governor Branstad said he plans to talk with Iowa House members about moving the legislation forward.  In the meantime, a bill is advancing in the Democratically-controlled Iowa Senate th

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Statehouse and Politics
8:27 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Lawmakers talk Bullying, Budgets, Minimum Wage

Credit John Pemble / IPR

Many were anticipating budget targets last week, Democrats who control the Senate and Republicans who control the House, have come to some kind of an agreement or a launching point. IPR's Clay Masters checks in with Statehouse Correspondent Joyce Russell to preview the week ahead at the capitol.  

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News Buzz
2:18 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

Fireworks, Finding Exo-Planets, and More

Daniel R. Blume http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

On this News Buzz edition of the program, hear about a legislative shouting match, legalizing fireworks, the ACLU lawsuit against the Iowa Secretary of State, a survey of Iowans' thoughts on gay marriage, the Kepler mission, and a push to increase studying abroad.

Legislative shouting match and and other legislative fireworks:

ACLU lawsuit:

Same-sex marriage opinions:

Finding exoplanets:

Studying abroad:

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Horticulture Day
1:57 pm
Fri March 7, 2014

A Sure Sign of Spring!

Emerald Ash Borer
Phil Nixon University of Illinois

Horticulture day returns to its weekly schedule, a sure sign of spring!  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Extension Entomologist Donald Lewis about the likely impact of colder than usual temperatures on Iowa's insect population.  The answer:  "not much."  Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron talks about the timely tasks that need doing in your garden.

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News
5:18 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

New Neighbors

Lead case worker Ann Grove and translator Liberata Aung help Burmese refugees make a new home in Waterloo
Credit IPR's Pat Blank

  Since 1990, Waterloo has been a draw for refugees looking for a new start.  Five thousand Bosnians relocated there and over the years have had a significant positive impact on the business community and school system. Since 2010, an influx of nearly 12 hundred Burmese have made their way to Northeast Iowa. An initial federal grant has expired and now the search is on for sponsoring agencies to help foot the bills.

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River to River
4:36 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

'Strangers Will Choose My Grave' - Ukrainian Events, Family, and Music

Mass grave in Kharkov, Ukraine
Trey Ratcliff http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

‘Strangers Will Choose My Grave’ is part of the lyrics to a folk song that can bring a Iowan Ukrainian-American to tears.  A video of that song appears below.

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Nature
3:54 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Jane Goodall on Her Life, Work, and Legacy

Jane Goodall will be in Iowa on Monday, March 10 to present a lecture, “Sowing the Seeds of Hope”
World Bank Photo Collection / flickr

Jane Goodall is famous for her groundbreaking observation of wild chimpanzees; but for the last 30 years, she’s devoted most of her time to traveling the world, telling her stories, and trying to fan the flames of an environmental movement that could save her beloved chimpanzees and so many other species from extinction.

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Nature
3:53 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Jill Pruetz on Empathy Among Primates

Eric Kilby

Increasingly recognized as "the next Jane Goodall" in primatology circles, Iowa State University primatologist Jill Pruetz brings incredible research and stories back to Iowa from Senegal in western Africa, where she studies the lives of savanna chimpanzees.

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River to River
1:02 pm
Thu March 6, 2014

Putting Global Income Inequality into Context

Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. With an average annual income of $236, the DRC is considered the poorest country in the world due to war and corruption.
Irene2005

How does where someone is born affect how much money they'll earn over a lifetime? What does income inequality indicate about a country's society and basic economic health?

Branko Milanovic tackles these questions as a lead economist in the World Bank's research department, where he works on the topics of income inequality and globalization.

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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
9:53 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Vilsack: Trade Deal Negotiations Ongoing

U. S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, shown here speaking in Ames last summer, is urging patience on a trans-Pacific trade deal.
Amy Mayer/IPR

 

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is telling Midwest farmers to sit tight while his office hammers out a major trade deal with a group of Asian countries, called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

Agricultural exports are already at record highs and the export market is crucial for many Midwest farmers, particularly those who plant soybeans, wheat and corn. But USDA officials say the U.S. could be doing even more with the help of the TPP.

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Talk of Iowa
10:25 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Passenger Pigeon's Extinction

Passenger Pigeon, Ectopistes migratorius
Thomas A. Bennett

At one time, the passenger pigeon was everywhere in North America.  The population was 3 to 5 billion when European settlers first arrived, but by 1914 they were gone.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses the extinction of the passenger pigeon with Stan Temple of Aldo Leopold Foundation.

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Politics Day
3:34 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Putin and Ukraine

Putin depicted on a Russian doll
Amy Allcock

President Obama says that Russian incursion in Ukraine is against international law and a miscalculation that risks pushing former Soviet-bloc nations further from Moscow.  Russian President President Putin has defended his actions and criticized the U.S. response.  Listen to this political analysis of the situation.

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Talk of Iowa
3:19 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

The Brilliance of Winged Rats

One of the 32 rock doves used in Wasserman's research at the University of Iowa's Comparative Cognition Laboratory.
Sarah Boden Iowa Public Radio

Many Iowans find the common pigeon, or rock dove, a pest and call them "winged rats." However, this bird's brain is deceptively clever.

Ed Wasserman runs the Comparative Cognition Laboratory at the University of Iowa. Wasserman is world renowned for his work in animal intelligence, including proving that pigeons recognize individual human faces.

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Statehouse and Politics
9:17 am
Wed March 5, 2014

Wage Theft Crackdown Approved

On a strict party-line vote, the Iowa Senate  approved legislation backers  say will help crack down on employers who stiff workers for their wages.   Lawmakers say they hear often from immigrant workers in particular in construction and other industries who say they did the work for contractors but didn’t get paid.   Some employers tell a different story.

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River to River
3:28 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

College Depression

Art major Jordon Deutmeyer stands outside of the University of Northern Iowa Honors Cottage in December 2013
Linh Ta/IowaWatch IowaWatch.org

Accommodations are available for college students struggling with depression, but university counseling centers are struggling to keep up with the demand. Hear about an IowaWatch.org report on the difficulty these students experience including what is often a harsh stigma associated with being depressed.  Also in this program, media political economist Robert McChesney has a bleak assessment of our new age of internet journalism. “Rupert Murdoch, the greatest media imperialist of our era, the guy who’s had patience of decades to take over China.

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Talk of Iowa
2:36 pm
Tue March 4, 2014

Internment Camps in the U.S.

John Nakamura Remy http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

In 1942, the U.S. Government issued evacuation notices “to all persons of Japanese ancestry.”  In the wake of Pearl Harbor, more than 110,000 Japanese-Americans were forced out of their homes and into internment camps.  In this 'Talk of Iowa' program, Iowa State University Professor Emeritus and author Neil Nakadate talks about his family’s incarceration and his new memoir Looking After Minidoka.

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Agriculture and Harvest Public Media
8:59 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Report Says U.S. Wastes Nearly One Third of Food Produced

Americans wasted an estimated 133 billion pounds of food in 2010, according to a USDA study.
petrr/Flickr

 

Nearly a third of the food available to be eaten in the U.S. is thrown out instead. And all of that wasted food comes with a steep price tag.

According to a new report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Americans wasted an estimated 133 billion pounds of food in 2010, the most recent year data is available. That’s 31 percent of the food sold at grocery stores and served in restaurants. The study does not include food wasted prior to the retail level.

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Talk of Iowa
6:46 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

The Tenacity of a Small Town Newspaper

Greenfield’s Fourth of July watermelon run race, 1932.
K.H. Sidey Adair County Free Press

For 125 years, four generations of the Sidey family have delivered the news of Adair County.  While many small, independently owned papers perished or became parts of large conglomerates the Adair County Free Press persisted.

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Education
3:13 pm
Mon March 3, 2014

Learning English in Iowa

Vinh Nguyen, English Language Learners Program Coordinator for the Des Moines Public Schools
John Pemble/ Iowa Public Radio

Iowa schools are becoming more diverse, and English Language Learning services are in greater need.  Districts are trying to adapt, and the Iowa legislature has some ideas for addressing the issue.  On this Legislative Day River to River program, guests include Des Moines Senator Janet Petersen, Council Bluffs Representative Mary Ann Hanusa, Legislative Analyst for the Urban Education Network Margaret Buckton, English Language Learners Program Coordinator for the Des Moines Public Schools Vinh Nguyen, and Director of Refugee Services at Lutheran Services in Iowa Nick Wuertz.

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Education
7:30 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Schools Adapt to Rapidly Diversifying State

Meredith Middle School students learn about the planets in Jillea Bueso's classroom.
Credit Clay Masters / IPR

At Meredith Middle School on Des Moines’ northwest side there are more than 30 ways students say hello. The number of languages can change week to week. This school year the Des Moines school district will receive more than 6 million dollars from federal and state funds for ELL services, and will also spend more than a million dollars of its own money. Next year the district plans to have more than 6,000 ELL students.

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Statehouse and Politics
6:25 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Iowa Lawmakers Expect Early Legislative Adjournment

Credit John Pemble / IPR

The Iowa legislative calendar has the last day of the 2014 session falling late next month. Last week Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal, a Democrat from Council Bluffs, said Iowa Republicans and Democrats have gotten better working together.

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Classical
6:00 am
Mon March 3, 2014

Symphonies of Iowa Presents DMSO's The Planets- Other Worlds? Concert

Credit Imagined Reality

Iowa Public Radio proudly showcases the Des Moines Symphony Orchestra and their fourth collaborative performance with the Chicago Symphony’s Beyond the Score series on Iowa Public Radio’s Symphonies of Iowa, scheduled for Sunday, March 9, 2014 at noon and Monday, March 10, 2014 at 7 p.m.

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Environment
8:00 am
Sun March 2, 2014

Rusty Blackbird Blitz in Iowa

Rusty Blackbrid
Credit G.Hoffman & C. Mettke Hoffman

Although the current weather may not feel like spring is near, many birds are already beginning to migrate. And that includes the Rusty Blackbird. But the species is declining. And that is where the Rusty Blackbird Spring Migration Blitz comes in. It’s a bird count of sorts.  The event’s Iowa coordinator Chelsea Underwood says there are several ways to identify the bird….     For more information go to www.rustyblackbird.org. Or, contact your local bird-watching group.

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News Buzz
3:25 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Wildlife Populations Down This Winter

Iowa's deer population has been dwindling since its peak in early 2000
Geoffrey Fairchild

Today on River to River, we bring you six stories.

First, University of Iowa President Sally Mason meets with the Board of Regents for a special meeting this afternoon to discuss her remarks on how the university handles sexual assault allegations. Iowa Public Radio correspondent Dean Borg tells host Ben Kieffer what to expect out of the meeting.

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Talk of Iowa
2:40 pm
Fri February 28, 2014

Fighting for Education Equality

The Alexander Clark House in Muscatine, Iowa. Clark was a pioneer for African-American education in Iowa.
Alexander Clark House

Knowledge is power and throughout history groups with power have denied it to others by limiting their access to education.  Even in Iowa, always a free state, the barriers to education for African-Americans were high.

Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Richard Breaux of the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and Kesho Scott of Grinnell College about the history of African-American students at Iowa's universities and colleges.

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News
11:28 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

UI Students Call For Stricter Sexual Assault Policies, Mason Shares Own Experience

Mason listens to student testimony during an on-campus forum.
Durrie Bouscaren Iowa Public Radio

Students at the University of Iowa called for the school to take a harsher stance against sexual assault, during an on-campus listening session with university officials Thursday. Female students discussed fears of walking home in the dark, or difficulties filing reports against perpetrators.  Others drew comparisons between the university’s formal zero-tolerance policies on drugs and plagiarism, but not for sexual assault.

President Sally Mason used her opening remarks to discuss her own experience with sexual assault, as an undergraduate student in Kentucky.

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Juvenile Home Spat
5:08 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Parties Spar Over Juvenile Home Bill

Credit Photo by Dean Borg

On a strict party line vote, the Iowa Senate  approved a Democratic bill calling for a facility for delinquent girls in Iowa comparable to the boy’s facility in Eldora.  But  Republicans say a state-run institution  isn’t necessary, and the private sector can fill the need.   

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River to River
3:12 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

The Teenaged Brain

chandrika221

The drama of mood swings, impulsiveness and bizarre behaviors during adolescence
can take a toll on both teens and their parents. Neuropsychiatrist and bestselling author Dr. Daniel Siegel says that there is a lot of misinformation about this developmental period.

“There are common myths that we all hear about…that are actually not only wrong, they’re misleading and in some ways they’re disempowering.  So by learning the truths you can actually understand things as they actually are and then do something about them.”

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Talk of Iowa
12:18 pm
Thu February 27, 2014

Noonan: The Most Common Medical Syndrome You've Never Heard Of

Max is 6 and has Noonan syndrome
photo submitted

Noonan syndrome is a genetic condition.  The characteristic facial features include low set ears, widely spaced-eyes, bright blue or blue-green eyes, a low hairline at the back of the head, and multiple congenital problems like heart defects and an unusually shaped chest.

A person with Noonan syndrome is often short, has a broad or webbed neck, low set nipples, and bleeding problems.  Developmental delay or intellectual disability are also common.

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