News

Photo Courtesy of Decorah Newspapers

Flood waters in Northeast Iowa have inundated homes, and for many of those families, they'll be forced to rebuild without the benefits of flood insurance. Josh McGrath and his family were asleep in Freeport, Iowa on Wednesday when flood waters came crashing into their basement. He and his wife Miranda escaped with their three children through waist deep water outside their home to get to safety while their basement filled with water.

William Anderson

Hundreds of millions of people, young and old, have read the words of Laura Ingalls Wilder in the beloved Little House on the Prairie series.

Rob Dillard/IPR

Governor Branstad says the Iowa Highway Patrol will be available to help local law enforcement police a planned protest against the controversial Bakken Crude Oil Pipeline.  

Critics threaten to engage in civil disobedience Wednesday to stop construction at a rural Boone County location.  

At his weekly news conference Branstad, says the Iowa Highway Patrol protects the safety and well-being of Iowans.

“Whether it is at the State Fair or on the highways or wherever it might be,” Branstad says.

Dakota Access LLC

A group of landowners failed in their request of an emergency stay from the Iowa Utilities Board in a three-to-zero vote in an attempt to stop construction of the Dakota Access pipeline from beginning on their properties. The group contends that since the trenching of the pipeline is imminent, their constitutional right to due process hinges on the success of an emergency stay.

This ruling essentially kicks the decision back to Polk County Judge Jeffrey Farrell who told the landowners Monday they first had to seek relief from the IUB before petitioning the district court.

Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

Larry Gerdes is having his barn taken down and disassembled in Malta Bend, Mo. It's about the size of a three-car garage but stands much taller in a clearing surrounded by six-foot stalks of corn.

The barn's exterior is graying, part of its roof is missing and there's a gaping hole looking out from the hayloft. It's about 100 years old and it's not really useful.

"It's deteriorated and it would cost a lot of money to repair it," Gerdes says. "And it doesn't fit into the modern farming. Unless you got two cows to let them loaf inside, nothing fits and it's just obsolete."

Clay Masters / IPR

Donald Trump returned to Iowa Saturday where the race between him and Hillary Clinton remains very close. Trump was there for Iowa freshman Sen. Joni Ernst's Roast and Ride fundraiser, which features a motorcycle ride and barbeque.

Sen. Joni Ernst led the group of more than 400 riders on a 42-mile trip that started at a Harley Davidson dealer in Des Moines and ended on the Iowa State fairgrounds. Trump did not participate in the ride.

Michael Hartl / Wikimedia Commons

As summer comes to a close, insects and arachnids have some work to get done, and that makes them easier to see. According to Iowa State University Extension Entomologist Donald Lewis, it's been a good year for spiders. 

"I don't know that it's been a spectacular year, but it's been a good year," he says. 

"Its in the fall of the year when we can see them. Its in the fall of the year when they make their biggest webs, and it's the time of year when dew settles on the webs and makes them most visible." 

Hail Merry / Flickr

This week, controversy swirled around allegations that special access was given to Clinton Foundation donors when Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. 

Donna Hoffman, department head and associate professor of Political Science at the University of Northern Iowa, explains the emails show communication between the aides of the Clinton Foundation and Clinton as Secretary.

"There's no evidence that, 'Hey, I've given a donation so I must therefore be able to meet with Secretary Clinton,' but that's kind of the implication here, that there's the appearance of corruption."

Constructing A New Career

Aug 26, 2016
Pat Blank/IPR

      Iowa’s Workforce Development is nearing the end of a pilot project that adds a new interactive tool to the job search.  Earlier this week, Iowa Public Radio’s Pat Blank climbed aboard the so-called construction equipment simulator.

It’s hard to miss the brightly painted red and blue semi-trailer parked along University Avenue in Waterloo. It looks like it should be hauling a car to a NASCAR Race, but its mission is much more simple. Get drivers along the busy highway to take notice and pull in for a pit stop. It caught the attention Eric Wallsteadt and his two kids.

John Pemble

On this special edition of River to River, presented in conjunction with The Gazette, Ben Kieffer and co-host Jennifer Hemmingsen discuss the latest news from the campaign trail with panelists: Gazette political & investigative reporter James Lynch, along with Gazette columnists Lynda Waddington and Todd Dorman.

John Pemble

The Democratic candidate for U. S. Senate says efforts to improve Iowa’s water quality have been put off too long. Former Lieutenant Governor Patty Judge owns a cow-calf operation in Monroe County. 725 Iowa waterways are classified as “impaired,” according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Judge says it’s a huge issue.

Iowa Public Radio/Sarah Boden

A federal report released last year shows in 2014, for-profit companies managing part of Iowa’s three billion dollar Medicaid program made far fewer faulty payments than the state-run portion of the program.  

Governor Branstad says that shows fraud and abuse will go down, now that for-profit companies are in charge of most of Iowa’s Medicaid patients.      

Basic Books

Dan Flores, author of ten books on western U.S. history, calls coyotes "an American original," having evolved in North America over five million years ago.  Many people tried to kill them off as late as the 1960s, but they have bounced back and are now found in all states except Delaware and Hawaii.

Rob Dillard

The next recipient of the state’s highest award for an individual will be Des Moines philanthropist John Pappajohn.

At a luncheon to honor entrepreneurs, Governor Terry Branstad announced Pappajohn would receive the Iowa Award.

Pappajohn is known for his financial support of start-up companies and for the arts as seen in the downtown Des Moines sculpture park that bears his name.

Josh Davis / Flickr

Earlier this summer, the Center for Violence Prevention at the University of Northern Iowa received a grant of more than 46,000 dollars for a program called Coaching Boys Into Men. Over the course of this year, the program will help educators and coaches in the state teach young men how to intervene when they see a teammate behave abusively towards women and girls.

Flickr / Ka!zen

An anti-human trafficking panel will be held at Des Moines University on Friday. It aims to educate the public on recognizing and combating the enslavement of people for the purposes of forced labor or sex work.

One panelist is Cathy O'Keefe, director of the Quad Cities-based Family Resource's "Braking Traffik" program. She says no community is immune to the crime as it affects all ages, races and ethnicities. 

Courtesy of Jim Peters

Dogs have always had a knack for finding bones. Trained dogs can sniff out explosives, drugs, victims of disasters.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with the owners of some canine archeologists who put their bone finding skills to good use. The founders of Samaritan Detection Dogs use trained dogs to help in some unusual ways with archaeological research, conservation work, and human remains cases.

Des Moines Symphony

This week’s Symphonies of Iowa encore broadcast features the Des Moines Symphony’s “Prokofiev Symphony No. 5 – Beyond the Score” concert. The concert includes Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5 in the symphony’s 6th collaboration with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Also included in this broadcast will be a selection from the DMSO’s Beethoven one to nine project recorded throughout their 2003-4 season.

IPR/Tony Dehner

IPR's Studio One team returns to the Des Moines Social Club on September 1st to resume our series of live broadcasts. We've got a great slate of artists scheduled to perform over the next several months, beginning in September with Elizabeth Moen!

Based in Iowa City, Elizabeth Moen has joined us before at the Social Club, performing with Annalibera during IPR's collaboration with the Iowa Music Project. Her music has also been heard on both Studio One Tracks and Gas Money, Studio One's local music show that airs on our 24-hour web stream.

Winneshiek County Sheriff's Office

Mudslides and flooding of near-historic levels in northeast Iowa have washed out roads, and prompted both evacuations and school cancelations.

Winneshiek County saw the greatest amount of rainfall overnight. Some areas received more than seven or eight inches.

Winneshiek Co. Sheriff Dan Marx says he's planning for more flooding this evening, as the National Weather Service anticipates another quarter-to-half inch of rainfall.

Daniel R. Blume / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Objectivity, fairness and balance are values that have long guided journalism. But in our rapidly changing media environment, where affirmation is only a click away, do readers, listeners and viewers really want news that adheres to those values? The leaders of three Iowa journalism schools say they do.

Dakota Access LLC

The Iowa Utilities Board will hear arguments on Thursday morning regarding an emergency motion from a group of 15 landowners who want to keep the Bakken Oil pipeline off their properties. The group's attorney Bill Hannigan contends that condemnation hearings for turning over private land to pipeline company Dakota Access LLC have been faster than what was reasonable for the landowners to anticipate. 

F_A / Flickr, licensed through Creative Commons

Much of gardening is intuitive. Not so with lawn care.

Plants grow in the spring and summer, so you might think that would be the time to re-seed or over-seed your lawn. You would be wrong.

Iowa State University Extension Turf Grass Specialist Nick Christians says the date he circles on the calendar for planting grass seed is August 15th. He says that date gives the seed enough time to grow before a freeze, and cooler temperatures will give it a better chance of competing with other weeds.

Dean Borg/IPR

Republican Vice-presidential nominee, Mike Pence, was on the attack during a Monday rally in Cedar Rapids.

“Hillary Clinton should shut down the Clinton Foundation right now,” Pence told a crowd of about 200 people. “How in the world can they say they will shut down the Clinton Foundation if she’s elected President of the United States?”

Pence portrayed that as allowing “foreign contributors and major corporations to make down payments on access to the Clinton Administration.”

Amy Mayer/IPR file photo

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee plans to examine proposed mergers among agricultural chemical and seed companies in a September hearing.

 

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

A fading tradition is preserved at West Point Military Academy; a live color guard and bugler raise and lower the Stars and Stripes every day. Iowa's largest military installation plays a recording, and the flag flies day and night because it is lighted. 

Greg Hapgood is Public Affairs Officer for the Iowa National Guard. "Here at Camp Dodge we have reveille at 7 a.m. each morning and at 5 p.m. each night we have what's called retreat," says Hapgood. "So reveille is the raising of the flag. Retreat is the lowering of the flag." 

Schools across Iowa are beginning classes this week amid concerns from public health officials about the drop in vaccination rates. At many schools, the percentage of students fully vaccinated is below 90 percent, and at a few around the state, it's below 50 percent. 

State Epidemiologist Dr. Patricia Quinlisk says more families are seeking exemptions from vaccinations for a variety of reasons. 

"One of the reasons is that people no longer have seen these diseases and therefore don't realize how bad they can be," she explains. 

Joyce Russell/IPR

A now five-year effort to beef up science and technology education in Iowa schools is paying off, according to a study by Iowa’s three Regents universities. The program is known by the acronym "STEM," which stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. 

Backers say boosting STEM fields will help Iowa companies find employees for good-paying jobs in advanced manufacturing, information technology, and other fields. STEM Advisory Council Director Jeff Weld says the results so far are encouraging. 

Photo by John Pemble

University of Iowa President Bruce Harreld is beginning his first full school year at the helm in Iowa City. The former business executive took over the job in November of last year amid protests from some faculty and students over his lack of academic background. He says he hopes all that is behind him heading into this school year. 

"From my perspective, we're now hard at work on the real issues of moving the university forward. It feels like we're a lot calmer and much more focused in a lot of ways," he says. 

Joyce Russell/IPR

Gov. Terry Branstad confirmed on Monday that the for-profit companies now managing Iowa’s multi-billion dollar Medicaid program did not follow the rules in the first two months of operation. But the governor also says the state issued no warnings or fees, in spite of complaints of late payments to health care providers and delayed care to patients.  

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