Top Stories

joni ernst
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Ernst Says Obamacare Repeal Bill 'Unlikely' to Get a Vote

Sen. Joni Ernst told a loud crowd at the University of Iowa that it’s unlikely the Republican bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act will come up for a vote. The audience cheered when Ernst said the Graham-Cassidy bill likely won't go to a vote before a Sept. 30 procedural deadline. Sen. John McCain of Arizona announced his opposition to the bill shortly before Ernst’s appearance in Iowa City. An audience member asked Ernst if the bill could "spring back to life." Ernst said she...

Read More

Last week in the Russia imbroglio: Donald Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, got some bad news; members of Congress put social networks, including Facebook and Twitter, under the interrogation lights; and with all these many lawyers now running around — the meter is running too.

Much more below.

They say if you want something done right, do it yourself. But for Ray Halbritter, it was more a case of, "if you want something done at all."

Halbritter, the CEO of Oneida Nation Enterprises, wasn't seeing stories by or about Native Americans in mainstream media outlets, and on the rare occasion those places did try to write about indigenous people, the stories often got distorted.

If Senate Republicans vote to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act this week, it would affect the health care of pretty much every American.

Here's a recap of four key flash points in the health overhaul debate with links to NPR coverage over the past six months, and our chart laying out how the Graham-Cassidy bill under consideration in the Senate addresses those issues compared with the Affordable Care Act.

Last year, Harrison Browne was done with the National Women's Hockey League, retiring at age 23 in order to undergo hormone therapy and surgery as part of his physical gender transition.

Romanian photographer Mihaela Noroc spent nearly four years shooting portraits of — and collecting stories about — women from around the world.

The product of her vision — and her travels to 50 countries — can be seen in her book The Atlas Of Beauty, hitting shelves Tuesday.

The project, she says, began as something "very genuine and sincere" that she financed, initially, with her own savings — and by being frugal in her backpacking adventure. She later crowd-funded, including a Facebook campaign in March.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET Sunday

Editor's note: This story contains language that some might find offensive.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We want to talk a bit more about this key question of how the proposed Republican health care bill could affect people who need health care, particularly people with chronic or life-threatening health problems.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As the nation has debated the GOP proposals to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, NPR member station reporters have been talking to people around the country about how the proposed changes in the health law would affect them.

Here are five of those stories:

Pages

This summer, IPR examined the impact of HF 517, as well as other gun issues.

From "stand your ground" provisions to how gun policies are received by communities of color and how gun owners train in self defense and gun safety, join us as we discuss this important topic.

Studio One Featured Release

facebook.com/grizzlybear

Featured Release This Week From Grizzly Bear + Studio One Tracks Top 30 Playlist

Songwriter, vocalist, guitarist and keyboard player Ed Droste began Grizzly Bear in the early 2000s (in Brooklyn) as a solo project. As often happens, the solo project grew into a full band by the time of the second Grizzly Bear full-length album in 2006. The time between albums has increased; the new (fifth) record Painted Ruins arrives five years after the last one, Shields. With rich, layered soundscapes and strong songwriting, most Grizzly Bear fans would say the wait was worthwhile....

Read More

The Latest from IPR Classical

Deutsche Grammophon

Legos and Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” – It’s a Match

Antonio Vivaldi wrote over 500 concertos for various instruments. Today, most people know four of them. The Four Seasons for violin and chamber orchestra can be heard in countless movie soundtracks and TV ads. Many modern composers have been so inspired by the concertos that they have reimagined them in their own style. One such composer is Max Richter of Germany. Richter follows the basic outline of the compositions while diverging from the specifics. “The thing about Vivaldi,” Richter says,...

Read More