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Iowa State University

Ben Allen to Return to ISU as Interim President

Iowa’s Board of Regents is selecting a former Iowa State University administrator to return as interim president. The Regents are meeting Monday to name Ben Allen interim president. Allen served four years as ISU’s provost before the Regents appointed him president of University of Northern Iowa in 2006. He led that campus until retiring in 2013. At UNI, Allen presided over a series of cutbacks at the school to eliminate a $5 million budget deficit. He made the unpopular choice to close the K...

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Establishing and Restoring Windbreaks

The 2017 Iowa legislative session is underway, and Iowa Public Radio is covering what's happening. Listen to our weekly podcast "Under the Golden Dome" and stay current on issues that impact you.

Even as they lick their wounds from a failed Affordable Care Act repeal effort, Republican leaders in Washington are looking ahead to the next battle — over taxes.

"I would say that we will probably start going very, very strongly for the big tax cuts and tax reform," President Trump told reporters Friday. "That will be next."

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan agreed, though he conceded that the defeat on health care was a setback.

"This does make tax reform more difficult," Ryan said. "But it does not in any way make it impossible."

Washington, D.C.'s Capital City Public Charter School feels like a mini United Nations. Many of the school's 981 students are first-generation Americans with backgrounds spanning the globe, from El Salvador to Nigeria to Vietnam. So when the staff of the literacy non-profit 826DC began a book-publishing project with the junior class, they picked a topic everyone could relate to that also left room for cultural expression: food.

Editor's Note: This story includes videos and descriptions of violent encounters between police and civilians, as well as language that may not be appropriate for all readers.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "CITY GIRL")

UNIDENTIFIED GIRL: The following program was written in 2003 by a 12-year-old girl.

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) "City Girl."

SARAH RAMOS: I'm Sarah Ramos. I am the creator of "City Girl."

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

The African Global Economic and Development Summit took place at the University of Southern California from March 16th to 18th.

None of the approximately 60 invited guests from Africa were able to attend.

The problem was that none of the African delegates were able to get U.S. visas.

Humphrey Mutaasa from the mayor's office in Kampala, Uganda, had organized a delegation of 11 business leaders from Uganda to attend the African Global Economic and Development Summit at the University of Southern California.

The House Intelligence Committee's investigation into the Trump campaign's potential connections to Russia's election meddling isn't dead — but it's not exactly dancing a jig, either.

Sixteen-year-old Na Da Laing struggled in elementary school.

"I was different from other students," she remembers. "I couldn't speak English at all."

Now, eight years later, she's reading George Orwell's Animal Farm.

In the U.S., roughly one in 10 students is an English language learner.
Many schools struggle to help them feel comfortable with their new language. Helping them get ahead and to college is another challenge entirely.

No rest for the weary in our weekly roundup of national education news.

Supreme Court rules on special education case

"I'm thrilled," said Amanda Morin, a parent and advocate with the web site Understood.org, after the Supreme Court ruled unanimously in a case that could affect 6.5 million special education students. "Now I can actually go into a school system and say 'The Supreme Court has said, based on my child's abilities, he is legally entitled to make progress.'"

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Studio One Featured Release

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Featured Release This Week From Clap Your Hands Say Yeah

Clap Your Hands Say Yeah is known for the internet buzz that surrounded the band early in its career, around the time of their 2005 debut album. Music blogs and sites like Pitchfork effectively launched CYHSY, and of course raised expectations for each subsequent release. When the group began in 2004 (based in Philadelphia and Brooklyn, N.Y.), they were an actual band. Over time, members have gradually left, leaving only songwriter and lead vocalist Alec Ounsworth standing as the sole member...

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The Latest from IPR Classical

Keaton Scovel

IWO Flute Quartet Live!

Iowa flutist, conductor, and composer Harvey Sollberger received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Flute Association in 2015, as well as a funding grant from the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs for a recording and tour featuring work created over six decades of composing music in Iowa. The IWO Flute Quartet (named after the members' home states of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon) honors his achievements by performing his works on this performance live from IPR’s Studio One!...

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