Donald Trump

Clay Masters / IPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump was in Iowa last night, speaking just before his rival Hillary Clinton accepted the Democratic presidential nomination. This was Trump’s first trip to the state since coming in second in the state’s kick-off caucuses.

Trump told thousands packed in a hotel convention room in downtown Cedar Rapids he learned a lot from Iowa.

"I went around for two months even after I won in New Hampshire. I kept going back to Iowa," Trump told the crowd. "I’d go what happened?"

Joyce Russell/IPR

Iowa Republican Senator Chuck Grassley says he will not accompany GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump on his first visit to the state this week since winning the nomination, but that’s because of scheduling conflicts, and he does plan to appear with Trump in future visits to Iowa.  

Grassley will be on Iowa ballots this fall along with Trump, sparking speculation about how one campaign might be affected by the other.       

Grassley recalls in 2004, he was on the ballot with incumbent GOP president George W. Bush.   

Gage Skidmore

Donald Trump has picked Indiana Governor Mike Pence as a running mate. Will a Midwesterner help Trump win Iowa votes? Maybe. 

During this hour of River to River, host Ben Kieffer discusses Pence with Drake University's Dennis Goldford. Goldford is professor and chair of the political Science Department, and the Flansburg Fellow at the Harkin Institute. 

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee

In Washington D.C. the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is hard at work hoping to elect more Democrats to the U.S. House.  

In Iowa, they’ve targeted 3rd District Republican incumbent David Young for defeat.   

The DCCC has launched television ads linking Young to the presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump.  

The ads will run in Iowa through the Republican convention.   

The ads are running in ten congressional districts across the country.  

Amy Mayer/IPR file photo

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and other international trade deals may be to blame for some of the rift between the Republican presidential hopeful and his party's leaders, says Iowa's long-time Republican U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley.

Grassley says Donald Trump's opposition to the 12-country trade deal resonates more with the rank-and-file.

"The populists within the Republican Party probably agree with Trump," Grassley says. "But establishment Republicans—that's one of the things that they find fault with Trump about."

Jon Pemble/IPR file

Iowa’s senior U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley says his senate colleague Joni Ernst would bring a lot to the GOP ticket as Donald Trump’s running mate.

Ernst met with Trump in New Jersey on Monday, and afterwards said she and Trump had, "a good conversation."

Ernst is reportedly being considered for the number two spot on the GOP ticket.

Grassley says Ernst’s military and legislative experience, and her expertise as someone from a rural, agricultural state would be assets to the New York real estate mogul. 

Gov. Terry Branstad says he was encouraged by the unity and commitment he observed last Thursday night at the Lincoln Day Dinner, an annual fundraiser for the Iowa GOP.

Many Republican voters, both statewide and nationally, are struggling with whether to support Donald Trump, the party’s de facto nominee.  Though Branstad doesn’t support everything Trump stands for, he is endorsing the New York real estate mogul, citing national security, health insurance costs and debt.

Iowa Public Radio / Amy Mayer

Sen. Chuck Grassley says the Republican Party has time to unite behind real estate mogul Donald Trump, the apparent GOP presidential nominee, before the November Election. That's in spite of the fact that several prominent Republicans have withheld their endorsements.

CLAY MASTERS / IPR

Gov. Terry Branstad says he’ll support the nominee of his party in the presidential race this November. He adds that he'll be the very first to admit that he underestimated real-estate mogul Donald Trump, the apparent Republican nominee.

"This summer, when he came to the Iowa State Fair, flew his helicopter around and all of this stuff. I thought, 'This is not going to last,'" says Branstad. "Well I was wrong, as have been most of the pundits and political people."

Julie Falk / Flickr, licensed under Creative Commons

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders dished out humble pie to pollsters this week, when he claimed victory in Michigan, after no poll showed him leading, or even closing the gap with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Polls showed Clinton leading in the state by double digits in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Iowa State University Political Science Professor Jim McCormick says, as in most elections, it boiled down to economics in a state hit hard by the recession, with companies moving overseas and the challenges facing the automotive industry.

Billionaire Donald Trump won seven of the Super Tuesday primary contests to take a commanding lead in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton also claimed victory in seven of the states voting Tuesday, making it all but impossible for Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders to overtake her in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Russell/IPR

Governor Branstad Monday praised the timing of a high-profile endorsement for leading Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, but he didn’t say whether or not he agreed with the endorsement itself.   

New Jersey Governor and former candidate Chris Christie on Friday threw his support behind Trump.   

Governor Branstad says that shifted media attention away from Florida Senator Marco Rubio.

“I think it was a brilliant move and it obviously changed the coverage, so it was strategically a good move,” Branstad says.     

Joyce Russell, Sarah Boden, Amy Mayer/IPR

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won the Iowa caucuses for the Republican presidential nomination, while the Democratic race between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was considered neck-and-neck early this morning.

In a speech at the Iowa State Fairgrounds, Cruz thanked Iowa Republicans while also referencing scripture, Reagan Democrats, and what he calls “courageous conservatives”.

Dean Borg/IPR

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s half-hour rally in the University of Iowa Field House Tuesday night was frequently interrupted by chirping whistles and protest placards.  Each time, Tump paused, frequently yelling, “Get ‘em out!”

Trump opened the rally by parading members of the UI’s football and wrestling squads across the stage. He also pledged allegiance to Iowa by supporting ethanol and keeping Iowa’s presidential preference caucuses first in the nation.

With less than a week before the Iowa Caucuses, it seems to be a two-man race in the GOP field. The latest Quinnipiac University poll shows a statical dead heat between real-estate mogul Donald Trump with 31-percent of likely Republican caucus-goers, and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz with 29-percent. 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Republican presidential candidates Carly Fiorina, Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, and Donald Trump voiced their support for ethanol at the Iowa Renewable Fuels Summit in Altoona on Tuesday.

The candidates took aim the EPA for lowering the mandated amount of ethanol in the nation's fuel supply below targets set by congress in 2007. Iowa is the nation's leading producer of the renewable fuel, which in the U.S. is primarily made with corn. 

Clay Masters/IPR

Republican Presidential hopeful Donald Trump made a single stop in Iowa Tuesday, and used it to say America’s foreign policy has failed. He referred to the news that Iran was holding 10 U.S. Navy personnel after one of their boats had crossed into Iranian waters as an indication of where the U.S. is going as a nation. He also read a poem about a snake that was cold and brought in by a woman, only to bite her. He used it to defend to his policy to temporarily turn away Syrian refugees seeking entry into the U.S.

Mother Mosque website

The head of a Cedar Rapids mosque is inviting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to meet with members of the Muslim community.  Imam Taha Tawil of the Mother Mosque says his members would like to hear about Trump’s plans if he’s elected, and have a chance to talk to him about Muslims’ role in the U-S over the last 100-plus years. 

Joyce Russell/IPR

12-hundred people turned out at Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Cedar Rapids on Saturday for a Donald Trump rally.   There were more men in the crowd, but the women who did show up were fully on board with Donald Trump.  

As the Iowa caucuses draw near, more women than men remain undecided in the Republican race for President.  But this group of Iowa women isn’t wavering.    

65-year old Mary Brandt is a childcare worker from Clutier.

Trump Visits Fort Dodge

Nov 13, 2015
Iowa Public Radio / Sarah Boden

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump took his campaign to Fort Dodge Thursday night, for his first Iowa appearance since being assigned a Secret Service detail. The real estate mogul spoke to a crowd of roughly 1,700 people at Central Iowa Community College.

Trump took some swipes at the media and its lukewarm reviews of his performance in the latest GOP debate, citing his favorable rankings in online polls.

Sioux City Schools

Latino activists in Sioux City are gathering signatures to protest Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s appearance at West High School next Tuesday evening. They plan to present a petition to the Superintendent of Schools in Sioux City saying Trump should not be allowed to use school property.

Pat Blank/IPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump filled an iconic Waterloo ballroom with more than 12 hundred supporters. The crowd at the Electric Park Ballroom repeatedly chanted "USA" and "Trump, Trump, Trump".  The GOP front runner got some of the loudest applause when he talked about repealing the Affordable Care Act, or "Obamacare".

Joyce Russell/IPR

Eight Republican candidates for President were in Des Moines last night, vying for the votes of Christian conservatives at the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition’s annual fall banquet. 

Some evangelicals say it’s hard to win the Iowa caucuses without their support but so far they have not coalesced behind a single candidate.  

Some have chosen sides.  Jeff Newell of Granger waved a sign for Texas Senator Ted Cruz as hundreds of activists filed in to the Knapp center at the fairgrounds.  

“I think Christians are getting a raw deal,” Newell says.   

Joyce Russell/IPR

Republican Lieutenant Governor Kim Reynolds has added her voice to criticism of GOP presidential hopeful Donald Trump’s latest controversial statements. 

In an interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Trump viewed Republican presidential candidate Carly Fiorina on camera and remarked, “Look at that face.   Would anyone vote for that?” 

Reynolds says that’s not acceptable.

“I don’t find it acceptable in politics,” Reynolds says.  “I don’t find it acceptable in business.  I don’t find it acceptable anywhere.”  

Clay Masters / IPR

Republican presidential frontrunner Donald Trump made a campaign stop at the Iowa State Fair Saturday. Trump passed on a popular state fair candidate event and instead gave kids a ride on his helicopter before walking around the fairState Fair officials told Donald Trump he could not land his helicopter on the Iowa State fairgrounds, so he did it less than a mile away and flew kids over the fair. He also spoke to reporters and says his brain has built a great business and will be good for the country.

Clay Masters/IPR file photo

Iowa’s Fourth District Congressman, Republican Steve King, says he’s evaluating candidates seeking the Republican Presidential nomination, and may be endorsing one of them later this Fall.

He’s not ruling out endorsing Donald Trump.

“He’s shown a confidence in leadership,“ King says.  “And he’s been able to step forward and say things that were true. He’s been attacked for these, and they’ve turned out many of them to be true.”

Joyce Russell/IPR

Governor Branstad says it’s too early to predict a winner in the race for the Republican nomination for president.   But he says that it will probably not be real estate mogul Donald Trump in spite of his first place ranking in current national polls, and his second place standing among Iowa voters.

"It's way early and polls at this point in time tend to reflect name recognition," Branstad says. "And, obviously, he's a TV personality who has a lot of recognition, but there's a lot of really good candidates in this race.”

Joyce Russell/IPR

Real estate mogul and Republican candidate for president Donald Trump says he expects the other candidates to come after him hard when they meet in a debate next month.    But Trump is downplaying expectations for his performance.  

Only the candidates polling in the top ten will be allowed to participate.   

“I'm by far number one to the chagrin of many people,” Trump said at a news conference in Oskaloosa Saturday.   “But I’m not a debater.  I produce jobs.  I never stood at a podium and debated a large number of people.”  

John Pemble / IPR

These are the remarks, as delivered, by Donald Trump in his first visit to Iowa after declaring his candidacy for the Republican nomination for president, June 16, 2015.

Photo by John Pemble

Billionaire real estate magnate Donald Trump made his first Iowa visit Tuesday, after officially declaring his candidacy for president earlier in the day. The Republican told a crowd of roughly 450 people at  the Hoyt Sherman Place auditorium in Des Moines that his wealth would keep him independent of special interests while serving in the White House.

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