Here and Now

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

Keeping The Navajo Language Relevant

17 hours ago

As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it.

Listen to more of KJZZ’s coverage of the Navajo language here.

In an era where big sports titles most often go to the wealthiest teams, England’s modest Leicester City Foxes are defying the odds. Specifically 5,000-1 odds. The team that Sports Illustrated calls, “arguably the wildest underdog story in the history of professional sports,” is just one game away from being crowned champions of the English Premier League. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Grant Wahl of Sports Illustrated’s Planet Fútbol about what makes the Foxes such unlikely champions, and what needs to happen to make that dream a reality.

The Pros And Cons Of A Gap Year

17 hours ago

The White House says Malia Obama will attend Harvard University in fall, 2017 after taking a gap year. Once more common among European college students, a number of American students are now taking a year off between high school and college. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to college counselor Lisa Micele about why some students take gap years, what they do what their time, and how colleges view students who decide to take that year off.

Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss stories currently getting traction on social media.

As the Republican nominating contest turns into a race for delegates and not just votes, some might ask why we even have delegates. Shouldn’t a popular vote suffice? Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Richard Pacelle, professor of political science at the University of Tennessee, to find some answers.

The crew of the Air Force warplane that destroyed a hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan last year did not have access to the “no-strike list” that specifically forbade targeting it, a Pentagon report says today. But the Pentagon says that lapse and the airstrike that killed more than 40 people at the Doctors Without Borders hospital was “caused by a combination of human errors” – not by deliberate action. That’s why US officials say the strike is not a “war crime,” as Doctors Without Borders and other critics have charged.

The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

From Capitol Hill To The Silver Screen

Apr 28, 2016

In the new film “The Congressman,” actor Treat Williams plays Charlie Winship, a Vietnam-era veteran turned U.S. congressman. The plot is based on the real life of Robert Mrazek, who represented Long Island, New York, from 1983 to 1993. But, as he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, he always wanted to be a filmmaker.

The Commerce Department reported today that the U.S. economy grew at its slowest quarterly rate in two years, with the GDP expanding just 0.5 percent. Consumers are cutting back on spending, and businesses on investments, as Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine explains to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Six people have been diagnosed with measles in the Memphis area in less than a week. That’s more cases in just a few days than the entire country had seen so far in 2016.

There are also several outbreaks of mumps right now, including at universities in Indiana, Ohio and Massachusetts. At Harvard University alone, at least 40 people have been diagnosed in the last couple of months.

DJ Sessions: Improvising In Harlem

Apr 27, 2016

When you think of musical improvisation, classical music probably does not come to mind. But WQXR classical music DJ Terrance McKnight tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that there’s a lot of it going on right now, particularly in the classical music coming out of Harlem.

Apple’s stock was falling Wednesday, after the company reported its first quarterly drop in earnings in 13 years on Tuesday. Exxon Mobil also this week saw its credit rating drop for the first time since the Great Depression. And Chipotle reported a double-digit sales drop in the first quarter of this year. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what this week’s news means for these three companies.

While media giant Gannett tries to acquire the parent company of the Los Angeles Times and eight other daily newspapers, The New York Times says it will close its Paris editing and printing operations, eliminating 70 jobs. NPR’s David Folkenflik speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about news in the print journalism world.

Pittsburgh has more than 440 bridges in its city – more than Venice, Italy – earning it the nickname the “City of Bridges.” For many residents, the bridges represent the city’s historic ties with industrial production, engineering and steel.

But at least 20 bridges are now labeled “structurally deficient” by state and local officials, often due to age and weather damage. The Liberty Bridge, which once carried an estimated 54,000 vehicles a day, is now undergoing a three-year reconstruction estimated to cost almost $90 million.

More than 700,000 people have signed an online pledge to boycott Target, in response to its inclusive bathroom policy. The pledge was started by the American Family Association after Target last week published a statement saying “we welcome transgender team members and guests to use the restroom or fitting room facility that corresponds with their gender identity.”

Led Zeppelin To Climb The Stairway To Court

Apr 22, 2016

Led Zeppelin band members Jimmy Page and Robert Plant are expected in court on May 10 for the beginning of a trial to determine whether their iconic song “Stairway to Heaven” was partially plagiarized from the song “Taurus” by a little-known 1960s band called Spirit.

Though Plant and Page say they don’t remember hearing the song or seeing Spirit perform, the plaintiffs argue that the lack of memory is due to drug and alcohol use by the band. Plant and Page are requesting that their past drug use not be admissible in the trial.

Passover, the Jewish holiday celebrating the Jews liberation from slavery in Egypt, begins tonight. As Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst tells hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson, it’s also a time to celebrate tradition, family and food. She shares some of her favorite recipes with us.

Uber reached a settlement in class-action lawsuits in California and Massachusetts, allowing the company to continue to classify workers as independent contractors rather than employees.

The settlement calls for Uber to pay as much as $100 million to about 385,000 drivers represented in the cases, but it allows the ride-hailing company to avoid having to pay minimum wage or contribute to workers’ Social Security.

The Treasury Department announced yesterday that Harriet Tubman will soon become the first African-American to be on the front of a currency bill, and the first woman on U.S. currency in a century.

Tubman, who’s best known for her work as an abolitionist, and a so-called conductor on the Underground Railroad, will replace President Andrew Jackson, a slave owner and anti-abolitionist, on the front of the $20.

Remembering The Life And Legacy Of Prince

Apr 21, 2016

Pop superstar Prince, widely acclaimed as one of the most inventive musicians of his era with hits including “Little Red Corvette,” “Let’s Go Crazy” and “When Doves Cry,” was found dead at his home on Thursday in suburban Minneapolis, according to his publicist.

His publicist, Yvette Noel-Schure, told The Associated Press that the music icon died at his home in Chanhassen. No details were immediately released.

Saudi Arabia warned last week that it would sell its investments in the U.S. if Congress passes a bill allowing victims of terror attacks like 9/11 to sue foreign governments. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with business journalist Ali Velshi about the impact if Saudi Arabia followed through on the threat.

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew has decided to put Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill, making her the first woman on U.S. paper currency in 100 years, a Treasury official said Wednesday.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity in advance of Lew’s official announcement, said that the 19th century abolitionist and a leader of the Underground Railroad, would replace the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the nation’s seventh president.

Lew’s announcement is expected to provide details on other changes being made to the $20, $10 and $5 bills.

Michigan’s attorney general filed felony and misdemeanor charges Wednesday against three state and city environmental managers in connection with the lead contamination of the Flint water supply. The charges are the first to be filed in the ongoing state investigation into the contaminated water. A federal investigation is also ongoing. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Lindsey Smith, who covers the Flint crisis for contributor station Michigan Radio.

President Obama met Saudi Arabia’s King Salman in Riyadh today. The president’s final visit to the kingdom comes during a time of strained relations. The Saudis are concerned about the U.S. nuclear deal with Iran and the fight against ISIS. On President Obama’s agenda are questions about Saudi Arabia’s human rights record. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Greg Myre of NPR about the issues involved in the talks.

Across the country, school districts get their funding from property taxes. But the Texas Supreme Court will soon rule on a challenge to that system, which opponents say short-changes poor children and those whose parents don’t speak English.

Ahead of today’s New York’s primary, many polls showed Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton comfortably ahead of her rival, Bernie Sanders. But Sanders, who has drawn big crowds at his New York rallies, says polls can be wrong. What is the outlook for Sanders in New York and beyond? NPR’s lead political editor Domenico Montenaro addresses that question in his conversation with Here & Now‘s Robin Young.

As New York State votes in the primaries today, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with veteran Democratic U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter, one of the longest-serving women in Congress. They discuss the issues that matter most to her constituents and why she’s stumping for Hillary Clinton.

President Obama recently described the lack of planning for post-civil war Libya as the worst mistake of his presidency. Shahrazad Kablan advised the White House during the Libyan civil war, and tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that she is disappointed with the president’s comments and his Libya policy.

Here & Now’s Robin Young sat down with Linda Stasi, the longtime firebrand columnist for the New York Daily News, the left-leaning tabloid with the wild front pages (see some of them below). Stasi talked about the presidential campaign and the boost that Donald Trump has given her paper.

Stasi also addressed concerns that the New York Daily News and her coverage of Trump have helped to create him as a national candidate. “We did not create him, we put him on steroids,” she said.

Prices on crude oil dropped Monday as OPEC members failed to reach an agreement on freezing oil production. Jill Schlesinger of CBS News joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to explain this, as well as the latest step in Amazon’s plan to expand its business in streaming video.

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