Charity Nebbe

Talk of Iowa Host

Charity Nebbe grew up in rural Iowa just outside of Cedar Falls.  She began her career in public radio at WOI Radio in Ames, Iowa when she was a student at Iowa State University and has been working in public radio ever since.  Early in her career she created Chinwag Theater a nationally syndicated public radio show that she produced and co-hosted with well known author Daniel Pinkwater.  She spent ten years at Michigan Radio in Ann Arbor and in 2010 returned to Iowa. 

Charity is now the host of Iowa Public Radio’s Talk of Iowa, heard weekday mornings at 10.  She is also the host of Iowa Ingredient, soon to debut on Iowa Public Television and the author of the children's book “Our Walk in the Woods,” published in 2008. 

Charity's favorite public radio program is On The Media.

Ways To Connect

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Iowa's cultural and economic shift away from the family farm created serious problems for the state.  It has also created opportunities for reinvention and creativity.

Turn Here Sweet Corn

Oct 21, 2013
Univeristy of Minnesota

Through high winds and hail, dry years and wet, and through the pressures of development and corporate interests Atina Diffley and her husband Martin ran one of the first certified organic produce farms in the Midwest.

Diffley has written about her farm and her life in the book, "Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works."

Tejvan Pettinger

The rich yellows, oranges and reds of fall are dominant in the current October landscape, but it’s time to start thinking about the pinks, purples, and whites of Spring. 

Host Charity Nebbe sits down with  Iowa State University horticulturists Cindy Haynes and Denny Schrock. They discuss planning for planting bulbs of spring flower gardens, as fall is the perfect time to plant tulips and daffodils.

Courtesy of Snyder family

Don Snyder never got to know his mother. She died just sixteen days after he and his twin brother were born in 1950. The truth about her death remained a secret for decades. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Don about discovering his mother’s secret and what he hopes to accomplish by telling her story.

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center

Today is World Food Day.  Observed every year since 1981, it focuses on the problem of hunger around the globe.  Also, this week is the World Food Prize Symposium in Des Moines and some of the most innovative thinkers in the fight against hunger have come to Iowa.

I-5 Design & Manufacture

Recent movements addressing the obesity epidemic or industrial agriculture's dominance attempt to change how Americans eat.  Tracie McMillan sets out to understand the American food system from the bottom-up in  her book, “The American Way of Eating: Undercover at WalMart, Applebees, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table.”  Host Charity Nebbe asks McMillan where our food comes from and how we can eat healthier. 

Mark Hirsch

"That Tree" is a lonely Bur oak standing in the middle of a cornfield in Southwest Wisconsin. That Tree is a tree that sparked the imagination of photographer Mark Hirsch. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Hirsch about what drew him to That Tree and his year long odyssey, taking a picture of the tree every day for a year… and the stunning results.

Samuel Mann

For a lot of us there is a disconnect between what we eat and where it comes from. Kids who spend time in the garden are lot more likely to make the connection. Today on Talk of Iowa, it’s Horticulture Day. Linda Naeve, of Iowa State University Extension, and Reiman Gardens' Aaron Steil will be here. Host Charity Nebbe talks with them about get kids involved in gardening, and they answer listener questions.

Raising Girls

Oct 10, 2013
Joe Lencioni

From Cinderella to Miley Cyrus our girls grow up in an environment rich in images of femininity.  Host Charity Nebbe gets insight into the challenges and dangers girls face as they grow and how the media influences their development.

Raising Boys

Oct 9, 2013
Jessica Lucia

Join host Charity Nebbe for the first of a two-part show about how children grow up.  Today, the focus is on boys.  How do they develop, what are their challenges and risks, and hear one perspective on how changes in education have affected how boys perform in the classroom.

asterix611 / flickr

The chill in the air and the color on the trees are sure signs of fall, but so are the large number of raccoons and possums you see along the roadsides. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe speaks with wildlife biologist Jim Pease.  They discuss why so many critters are on the move this time of year. 

Evelyn Birkby

Iowa's fastest growing demographic is comprised of individuals over the age of 85 and according to the U.S. census, Iowa is the fifth oldest state in the nation.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses how Iowa's oldest residents can maintain a good quality of life in their 80s, 90s and beyond with gerontologist Peter Martin, whose research specializes in centenarians.

It has already begun.  We can see a little bit of orange, some yellows and even some burgundies... and it's just going to get better.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with DNR District Forester Mark Vitosh about the conditions that lead to a vibrant fall and what our chances are this year.  They also discuss when to expect peak color and how to track the peak across the state.  ISU Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron also joins in to answer questions.

According to Kate Christensen, she has spent much of her life as, “a hungry, lonely, wild animal looking for happiness and stability.”  In her new memoir “Blue Plate Special" she writes about her life and the food she turned to for comfort as well as sustenance.  Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Christensen about her memoir and life as a writer.

A couple of weeks ago air conditioners were running full blast, but a couple of weeks from now our furnaces will be doing all the work. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe sits down with home improvement expert, Bill McAnally. They talk about changing filters and making sure your furnace is ready for the winter months.  Bill also answers your questions.

Alan Light / Flickr

Since its beginning, the conservation movement has been focused on preserving the natural places we still have, but Joe Whitworth, president of the Freshwater Trust, says that is not good enough.  Host Charity Nebbe talks to Whitworth about his work restoring freshwater ecosystems, how he believes that clean water can co-exist with profitable agriculture, and the future of conservation.  

Iowa State University

Iowa’s rich soil has made it an ideal place to grow plants, it has also made our state an ideal place to grow and train horticulturists.  Host Charity Nebbe, wraps up Iowa week with profiles of some of the most gifted and influential horticulturists in Iowa history.  Their lasting contributions include apples, roses, peanuts and the formation of Iowa State Agricultural College.

Peter Zillmann / HPZ / Flickr

Iowa is home to a baseball fan who sees ghosts, one spunky librarian who owns all the books in River City's library and a cat with presidential aspirations.  It is also the future birthplace of legendary starship commander Capt. James T.

Iowa Musicians

Sep 25, 2013
François Péladeau

Meredith Willson left his home state of Iowa behind when he was 18 years old, but later as his career soared, he brought Iowa to Broadway and Hollywood with “The Music Man.”  Join host Charity Nebbe as Iowa Week continues to hear the stories of some of Iowa’s most famous musicians.  

Steve Brower

Aldo Leopold once wrote, “I am glad I will not be young in a future without wilderness.” It is partly due to his work that today's children don’t yet face that future.  Today Charity Nebbe continues Iowa Week a discussion on Iowa’s most influential conservationists.  She looks into the lives and work of Earnest Oberholtzer, John Lacey, Ada Hayden, and Louis Pammel.

Iowa Athletes

Sep 23, 2013
Jon Fravel / Mike Hiatt / Ben Stanton

To start off "Iowa Week," host Charity Nebbe looks at the lives of a few of the prominent athletes in Iowa's history.  The discussion includes Nile Kinnick,  Jack Trice, and other football players, but also baseball, archery, and horseshoes.  

Maeve Clark

A flock of monarch butterflies gathering together for the migration south can be a truly magical sight, but it's a sight that has become less and less common in Iowa. This hour, host Charity Nebbe finds out what has happened to those beautiful flocks on Monarch Butterflies. We talk about the pressures that have resulted in the smallest population of Monarchs ever recorded.

Today's guests include: Iowa State University Extension entomologist, Donald Lewis, and Iowa State University Extension horticulturist, Richard Jauron.

http://almostpioneers.com/

In the fall of 1913, Laura and Earle Smith, a young Iowa couple from Moravia, made the gutsy decision to homestead in Wyoming. After four years of frustration, the Smiths moved back to Iowa and stayed put. Years later Laura wrote a vivid and self-depracating memioir of their time in Wyoming. Scholar John Fry discovered the manuscript, never before published, in the Women's Archives at the University of Iowa. Now, Laura's memoir has been published, titled "Almost Pioneers: One Couple's Homesteading Adventure in the West," edited by Fry.

Menopause

Sep 18, 2013
Ryan Lintelman / flickr

Hot flashes, night sweat, insomnia, irritability, anxiety…not all women experience these symptoms when they go through menopause though many do. This hour Charity Nebbe tackles menopause with evolutionary biologist Anne Bronikowski who explains how menopause is unique to the human species. Also Judith Houck, author of Hot and Bothered: Women, Medicine and Menopause in Modern America and gynecologist Dr. Susan Johnson join the program.

froggieb / Flickr

The changing season affects the animal behaviors in the sky and trees, on the ground and in the water.  Host Charity Nebbe speaks with wildlife biologist Rebecca Christoffel of Iowa State University Extension, ISU fisheries specialist Allen Pattillo and DNR forester Mark Vitosh.  

Biking in Iowa

Sep 16, 2013
jcarwil / Flickr

Cool, crisp air, beautiful fall foliage, great trails and great restaurants, autumn is a wonderful time to go for a long bike ride.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with travel writer Jennifer Wilson about bicycling destinations in Iowa.

USFS Region 5 / Flickr

The Emerald Ash Borer is in Iowa and a number of communities have already started cutting town ash trees in an effort to get ahead of the invasion.   Host Charity Nebbe, Mark Shour of ISU Extension Pest Management and horticulturist Richard Jauron discuss options for ash tree o

When a child is born, so is a grandmother. Today on Talk of Iowa, we explore the 21st Century grandmother. Host Charity Nebbe talks with a scholar about how the roles of grandmothers have changed over the generations, and she receives some advice for modern grandma’s from the author of “The Grandparents Handbook.”

Guests on today's program include Victoria Brown, L.F. Parker Professor of History at Grinnell College, and Elizabeth LaBan, author of The Grandparent’s Handbook.

Tito Perez

Name a famous person who appears regularly on NPR. His first name can be a noun or a verb, and his last name sounds like an article of clothing. Puzzlemaster Will Shortz joins Host Charity Nebbe to talk about how the New York Times crossword puzzle is put together and a little about his love of table tennis.  And hear about real-world problem solving with Invent Iowa, and one particular invention made by middle school girls in Council Bluffs.

Grief in Childhood

Sep 10, 2013
Alan Stuart

No matter how hard we try as parents and teachers we cannot protect all children from tragedy.  Join host Charity Nebbe who talks with Dr. David Schonfeld about how tragedy affects children and what we can do to help the children in our lives find their way through grief.  Also on the program is Sonni Vierling, Coordinator of the Central Iowa Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Steering Committee.

 

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