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Shots - Health News
2:31 am
Mon May 27, 2013

For Many, Affordable Care Act Won't Cover Bariatric Surgery

Evidence is growing that bariatic surgery reduces health risks of obesity.
Life in View Science Source

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 3:00 pm

Uninsured Americans who are hoping the new health insurance law will give them access to weight loss treatments are likely to be disappointed.

That's especially the case in the Deep South, where obesity rates are among the highest in the nation, and states will not require health plans sold on the new online insurance marketplaces to cover medical weight loss treatments like prescription drugs and bariatric surgery.

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Shots - Health News
2:30 am
Mon May 27, 2013

Overweight People Are More Apt To Ditch Doctors

Going to the doctor may be uncomfortable for people who are worried about weight.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 7:08 am

Patients struggling with obesity can have a tough time finding the right doctor, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

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Around the Nation
4:25 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

America's Vets: Returning Home To A Broken System

A wheelchair sits outside the Atlanta VA Medical Center in Atlanta. The latest figures show there are about 900,000 claims for benefits pending at the Department of Veterans Affairs.
David Goldman AP

The Department of Veterans Affairs is being criticized for the shortfall in care for almost a million veterans who can't get timely compensation and have been waiting hundreds of days for help, often to no avail.

Frustration with the agency came to a head last Thursday when VA Secretary Eric Shinseki was called before a closed-door meeting of the House Appropriations Committee.

"We are aggressively executing a plan that we have put together to fix this decades-old problem and eliminate the backlog, as we have indicated, in 2015," Shinseki said after the meeting.

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Tens Of Thousands Of Gay Marriage Opponents Protest In Paris

Thousands of supporters of the anti-gay marriage movement "La Manif Pour Tous" (Demonstration for all) wave flags as they gather at the Invalides square in Paris on Sunday.
Eric Feferberg AFP/Getty Images

Some 150,000 people hit the streets of Paris on Sunday to protest a law that legalizes same-sex marriage in France. The mass demonstration comes just days before the first ceremony is scheduled to take place.

The Guardian reports that police "evicted" about a dozen activists who climbed to the roof the Socialist party headquarters to unfurl a banner urging President François Hollande to resign.

The paper adds:

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Code Switch
3:08 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

'Part Of The Community': Latinos Rebuild After Okla. Tornado

Mynor Sanchez, a resident of Moore, Okla., lives a few blocks away and three houses down from major destruction. He is volunteering Friday in the neighborhood with his church, Templo El Alabanza, trying to do any tasks with which residents need help.
Katie Hayes Luke for NPR

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 7:29 pm

Pastor Chano Najera calls out T-shirt sizes in Spanglish to volunteers waiting for their uniforms.

It's easy to spot Najera in this crowd — just look for the cowboy hat. He preaches in Spanish at Templo De Alabanza in Oklahoma City. On this morning, though, he's wrangling a group of young Latino volunteers as they wheel cases of water bottles onto trucks headed for Moore, Okla., where an EF-5 tornado ripped through neighborhoods last week, but spared Najera's home.

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Movies I've Seen A Million Times
3:07 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

The Movie Gillian Anderson Has 'Seen A Million Times'

A scene from the animated film Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa.
Dreamworks AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 4:25 pm

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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Author Interviews
2:57 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

From A 'Death' To A Crisis, Tracing China's Bo Xilai Scandal

Chongqing Municipality Communist Party Secretary Bo Xilai attends the opening ceremony of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference at the Great Hall of the People on March 3, 2012, in Beijing, China.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 4:25 pm

On Feb. 7, 2012, Wang Lijun, a former Chinese police chief, showed up at the American Consulate in Chengdu, China. He said his life was in danger, asked for asylum and said he had information implicating Bo Xilai, an important member of the Chinese political elite, in the murder of a British citizen.

The incident set off an international media deluge, and the ensuing scandal sent ripples throughout the ruling Communist Party that are still being felt.

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Obama In Oklahoma: 'You Are Not Alone'

President Obama is greeted as he tours a tornado affected area on Sunday in Moore, Oklahoma.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

President Obama toured the devastation in Moore, Okla. Sunday afternoon, comforting some victims and pledging federal support. He said that he came to city as a representative of the American people.

"I'm just a messenger here," Obama said, "letting everybody know that you are not alone."

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Music Interviews
12:40 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Dirty Beaches: A Nomad Musician Starts Over (And Over, And Over)

Dirty Beaches is the performing title of the Taiwanese-Canadian musician Alex Zhang Hungtai. His new double album is called Drifters / Love Is the Devil
Daniel Boud Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:09 pm

Alex Zhang Hungtai is a musician who has spent his life drifting from home to home. His parents were children of communist China, and since setting out, he's lived in places as far-flung as Honolulu, Montreal and most recently, Berlin.

Under the name Dirty Beaches, Hungtai makes washy, dreamy rock music that often feels nostalgic. Hungtai's whole last album was dedicated to his father; he was inspired after finding out his dad had been in a doo wop cover band during his youth in China.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Sun May 26, 2013

Four Rockets Strike Hezbollah Strongholds In Lebanon

Lebanese men inspect destroyed cars after two rockets exploded in Shiah, a southern suburb of Beirut, on Sunday.
Anwar Amro AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 7:39 am

Four rockets hit areas of Beirut, Lebanon that are controlled by Hezbollah on Sunday. The attacks came hours after the leader of the militant group, Sheik Hassan Nasrallah, vowed to continue its fight to keep Syrian president Bashar Assad in power.

As the AP reports, Lebanon and Syria have a similar sectarian divide. The wire service reports:

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The Two-Way
11:26 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Justice Department Told News Corp. About Fox Subpoena In 2010

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 6:29 pm

Fox News officials professed indignation and surprise last week over the search of reporter James Rosen's records amid a federal leak investigation

But prosecutors told Fox's parent company of a subpoena nearly three years ago.

Prosecutors issued a subpoena for Rosen's phone records and got a judge to sign off on a sealed warrant for his emails back in May 2010.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Japan's ANA Puts Its 787 Dreamliners Back In Service

All Nippon Airways' Boeing 787 Dreamliner takes off from Chitose airport in Hokkaido, northern Japan, for Tokyo's Haneda airport on Sunday.
Jiji Press AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 9:30 am

Japan's All Nippon Airways put its fleet of Boeing 787s back in service Sunday. If you remember, the Dreamliners were grounded for four months after two separate airplanes had issues with their batteries overheating.

The BBC reports that the first Dreamliner flight landed at Tokyo's Haneda airport after a short flight from Sapporo today. The BBC adds:

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The Two-Way
8:26 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Report Raises Questions About Rutgers' New Athletic Director

Julie Hermann talks to the media after being introduced as Rutgers University athletic director on May 15, 2013 in Piscataway, New Jersey.
Rich Schultz Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 27, 2013 10:58 am

Struggling to emerge from the shadow of Mike Rice — the men's basketball coach fired after video showed him assaulting his players — Rutgers hired Julie Hermann, a new athletic director the school hopes would make things better.

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The Two-Way
6:44 am
Sun May 26, 2013

As Recovery Continues, Obama Heads To Oklahoma

Southmoore High School senior Jake Spradling hugs a classmate as they get ready to attend their commencement ceremony in Oklahoma City on Saturday.
Charlie Riedel AP

President Obama is scheduled to visit the city of Moore, Okla., today, to survey the devastation left behind by by a monster EF-5 tornado.

The AP reports:

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From Our Listeners
6:00 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Compromise' And 'The F'

iStockPhoto.com

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 4:25 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read The Art of Compromise by Lindsey Appleford of Boerne, Texas, and Claudia Who Found the F by Sean Enfield of Denton, Texas. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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The Salt
4:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Picnicking Through The Ages

An illustration of noblemen enjoying a picnic, from a French edition of The Hunting Book of Gaston Phebus, 15th century.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 2:56 pm

Whether a shepherd, an explorer, a hunter or a fairgoer, people have been eating outside since the beginning of time.

"The dictionaries confirm the word 'picnic' first surfaced in the 18th century, so we were picnicking before we had the term," says research librarian and food historian Lynne Olver, who runs the Food Timeline website.

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History
4:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

'Orphaned' By World War II, Children Salute Fallen Fathers

Paratrooper William John McLean II died on his son's second birthday. William McLean III is now 70.
Courtesy of William McLean III

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 6:48 pm

Memorial Day commemorates those who died serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. For some Americans, the day revives their few and fading memories of their fallen fathers. Those who lost a father in World War II are considered "war orphans." These are the stories of three of those children who have lived nearly all their lives without their dads.

A Voice From Heaven

Geraldine Conway Morenski holds onto a few distant memories of her dad: picking her up out of her crib, laughing, playing with her in the backyard.

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Around the Nation
4:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Indianapolis Speedway Needs Boost, But With Taxpayer Funds?

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence has approved $100 million in bonds to repair the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.
Jamie Squire Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 12:24 pm

Sunday is the 97th running of the Indianapolis 500, which draws hundreds of thousands of fans to the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. While it's an economic boon for the area, the 104-year-old track needs renovations — and just how it's getting the money is rubbing some Hoosiers the wrong way.

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Around the Nation
4:39 am
Sun May 26, 2013

Rebuilding Storm-Damaged New Jersey, One Boardwalk At A Time

People walk on the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J., on Friday. The Jersey Shore beaches officially opened for the summer, after rebuilding following the destruction left behind by Superstorm Sandy last fall. The storm caused $37 billion of damage in the state.
Julio Cortez AP

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 1:00 pm

When Hurricane Sandy swept through New Jersey last year, it destroyed many homes and businesses. It also obliterated the boardwalks that are the center of social and economic life in the towns.

In the months since, many of these towns have rushed to rebuild their boardwalks, but not everyone thinks the money has been well spent.

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Code Switch
4:39 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Job Searching While Black: What's Behind The Unemployment Gap?

A man interviews for a job in Detroit. The unemployment rate for black Americans in Michigan was 18.7 percent in 2012, more that twice the rate for whites in the state.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 5:04 pm

In the classic American story, opportunity is always in front of you. You finish school, find a job, buy a home and start a family; it's a rosy dreamscape.

But that world is one-dimensional. Income inequality is just about as American as baseball and apple pie. And though the economy has improved in the past few years, the unemployment rate for black Americans, now 13.2 percent, is about double that for white Americans.

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Books News & Features
4:39 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

A Lost And Found 'Wonder': Pearl S. Buck's Final Novel

Pearl Buck was born in West Virginia but spent much of her childhood in China, where her parents worked as missionaries.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 5:15 pm

Pearl S. Buck emerged into literary stardom in 1931 when she published a book called The Good Earth. That story of family life in a Chinese village won the novelist international acclaim, the Pulitzer and, eventually, a Nobel Prize. Her upbringing in China as the American daughter of missionaries served as inspiration for that novel and many others; by her death in 1973, Buck had written more than 100 books, including 43 novels.

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Author Interviews
4:39 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

A Literary Tale of Chechnya, The Horror and Whimsy

Russian soldiers take their position near the village of Shatoy, Chechnya.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 26, 2013 11:05 am

In his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, Anthony Marra transports readers to Chechnya, a war-torn Russian republic that has long sought independence.

The lyrical and heart-breaking novel begins in 2004 when a doctor watches as Russian soldiers abduct his neighbor, who has been accused of aiding Chechen rebels. He later rescues the neighbor's 8-year-old daughter, then colludes with another doctor to form an unlikely family amid the daily violence.

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Flooding Brings San Antonio To Standstill, Kills One

A San Antonio metro bus sits in floodwaters after it was swept off the road during heavy rains on Saturday.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 10:30 pm

A massive storm system has dumped more than 10 inches of rain over San Antonio, leaving the Texas city flooded and at a standstill.

Texas Public Radio's Ryan Loyd reports the area is still under a flash flood emergency. Ryan filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Some people didn't have time to make it to safety in rain-drenched San Antonio. A woman died when raging flood waters swept her away in her car. So much rain fell that it floated a city bus. Major highways are completely submerged.

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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Week In News: Obama's Foreign Policy Pitch

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 4:39 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, a novel of village life amid the daily violence of war-torn Chechnya. But first, President Obama sets a new course in the war on terror.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Our systematic effort to dismantle terrorist organizations must continue. But this war, like all wars, must end.

LYDEN: James Fallows of The Atlantic joins us, as he does most Saturdays. Hi there, Jim.

JAMES FALLOWS: Hello, Jacki.

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NPR Story
3:47 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Is the Espionage Act Outdated?

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 4:39 pm

Weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden speaks with Benjamin Wittes of the Brookings Institution about the Espionage Act. This Word War I-era legislation has been used more frequently in recent times to prosecute government employees who leak information to the press, but the limits set by the act are poorly defined for our modern age.

The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

'We'll Keep Running': Thousands Complete Final Mile Of Boston Marathon

Erin Roy, left, comforts Elise Wulff as runners cross the finish line after completing the final mile of the Boston Marathon course during "#onerun" in Boston, Massachusetts, on Saturday.
Dominick Reuter Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 3:24 pm

It was cold and rainy today in Boston. Still, thousands of runners laced up their shoes and headed to Kenmore Square.

That's the site of the final mile marker for the Boston Marathon. On April 15, when two bombs exploded near the finish line, thousands of runners could not finish the most illustrious road race in the world.

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U.S.
2:50 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Stunned By Military Sex Scandals, Advocates Demand Changes

President Obama speaks at the commencement ceremony for the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., on Friday. The president urged new graduates to exhibit honor and courage in tackling incidents of sexual assault as they assume leadership positions in the military.
Patrick Semansky AP

West Point alum Donna McAleer was at her Utah home last week when she got a call asking if she'd "seen the latest."

A male Army sergeant, a friend told her, had just been charged with secretly photographing and videotaping at least a dozen female cadets at McAleer's alma mater.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Sat May 25, 2013

Obama Forgets To Salute; Sparks Debate On Presidential Tradition

President Obama greets a Marine after forgetting to salute him while boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 25, 2013 1:55 pm

As President Obama boarded Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on Friday, he didn't return the salute of the Marine standing at the base of the stairs.

Obama realized it once he got into the helicopter, so he turned around and shook the Marine's hand. Here's video of the moment:

As happens with anything to do with the presidency, Obama's forgetfulness unleashed scrutiny and criticism.

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The Salt
11:40 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Meet London's Master Architects In Jell-0

Sam Bompas (left) and Harry Parr made names for themselves with spectacular gelatin creations.
Courtesy of Sam Bompas

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:05 pm

Banana-flavored vapors? A pineapple island?

These may sound like the makings of a Roald Dahl children's book (he of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory fame). But at London's Kew Gardens, visitors can now immerse themselves in such fantastic-sounding experiences like rowing down a blue-dyed boating lake to the aforementioned island, which features a 15-foot replica pineapple towering over a banana grotto.

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StoryCorps
10:10 am
Sat May 25, 2013

Sole Survivor: Iraq Rescue Mission Ended In Tragedy

In 2005, Lance Cpl. Travis Williams lost his squad to an IED. He was the only survivor.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:52 pm

Lance Cpl. Travis Williams, 29, is an Iraq War veteran — and the only post-9/11 Marine to lose every other member of his 12-man squad. It happened in August 2005, when Williams and his teammates were sent on a rescue mission in Barwanah, Iraq.

"That morning, we loaded into the vehicle," Williams recalls. "And I get tapped on the shoulder, and I got told that I need to bounce up to the next vehicle. I said, 'Catch you guys on the flipside.' And that was the last thing I ever said to them."

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