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11:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Security Threats Hit Deeper Than Heartbleed Bug

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. You might have been hearing about the Heart Bleed bug over the past couple weeks. And if you haven't, you might want to check it out. It's important. That is the security flaw the researchers say could have compromised up to half a million websites. So maybe you changed your passwords for your online accounts by now.

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Music
11:27 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Library Of Congress, How Could You Forget Run-DMC?

Rap group Run-DMC at the second annual MTV Video Music Awards. Does the group belong in the Library of Congress?
Suriani AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:53 pm

Rap and hip-hop have been around for decades and have become one of America's most successful cultural exports.

But when the Library of Congress added new recordings to its national registry this year, none of them were hip-hop.

Tell Me More guest host Celeste Headlee discusses that with William Boone, professor in the English and African-American studies department at Winston-Salem State University. He says that hip-hop artists are used to being overlooked by the powers that be.

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It's All Politics
11:20 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Obama Seeks Wider Authority To Release Drug Offenders

President Obama signs the Fair Sentencing Act in 2010, as Attorney General Eric Holder and a bipartisan group of senators look on.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:17 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder announced Monday that the Obama administration is formulating new rules that would give it, and the president, far more latitude to pardon or reduce the sentences of thousands of drug offenders serving long federal prison sentences.

The move comes amid a broad national reconsideration of mandatory minimum sentences approved by Congress in 1986, when America's big cities were in the grip of a crack cocaine-fueled crime wave.

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Biden Visits Ukraine In Show Of U.S. Support

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Andrii Deshchytsia (center) greets Vice President Joe Biden at the airport in Kiev on Monday.
Yuriy Maksimov EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:04 pm

The situation in eastern Ukraine remains on edge Monday, following a weekend of violence that reportedly left up to five pro-Russian separatists dead at the hands of Ukraine nationalists. Moscow has used the killings to press its case that Ukraine's Russian speakers are threatened and to accuse Kiev of not living up to last week's agreement on steps to ease tensions.

Here's some of the latest news from the region:

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The Two-Way
9:35 am
Mon April 21, 2014

After Tragedy, Nepalese Sherpas May Refuse To Climb Everest

Mount Everest straddles the border of Nepal and the Tibetan region of China. This is a view of the Nepalese side.
Hans Edinger AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:37 am

Friday's tragedy on Mount Everest in which at least 13 Sherpa guides were killed in an avalanche has led others among that group of Nepalese who lead foreigners up the world's tallest mountain to issue some demands — and threaten to boycott the soon-to-start climbing season if their requests aren't granted.

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The Two-Way
8:36 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Win Tin, Myanmar's Longest-Serving Political Prisoner, Dies

Win Tin, pictured at his Yangon home in 2013, was a prominent journalist who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner after challenging military rule.
Gemunu Amarasinghe AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:07 pm

Win Tin, a former newspaper editor who became Myanmar's longest-serving political prisoner for his pro-democracy activism, has died. News reports gave his age as 84 or 85.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Mon April 21, 2014

As It Happened: American Wins 118th Running Of The Boston Marathon

Boylston Street's 26-mile marker will be a welcome sight to the thousands of runners who are in today's Boston Marathon. Today marks the 118th running of the race.
Jared Wickerham Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:11 pm

There is no doubt the bombings of last year cast a long shadow on the 118th running of the Boston Marathon.

It was an inevitable backdrop: The signs on the buildings that line the course near the finish are usually covered in witty, encouraging posters. This year, they encouraged a greater kind of perseverance.

"Boston Strong," they exhorted.

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The Two-Way
7:47 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Teen Survives Flight To Hawaii In Jet's Wheel Well, FBI Says

It was a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767 such as this, authorities say, on which a California teen stowed away in the wheel well. He reportedly survived the 5 1/2-hour flight from San Jose to Maui.
PR News/Hawaiian Airlines

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 10:36 pm

"Aviation experts call it a miracle," says Honolulu's KHON-TV. "The FBI says a 16-year-old boy stowed away in the wheel well of a flight from California to Hawaii, and survived. The boy is expected to fully recover."

Update at 11:33 p.m. EDT: The AP is now saying the boy is 15, not 16, as was earlier reported.

Our original report continues:

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Murder,' South Korean Leader Says Of Ferry Captain's Actions

A prayer for the missing and dead: Family members and friends have gathered in the port city of Jindo, South Korea, as the search continues for the scores of passengers still missing after last Wednesday's ferry disaster. At the water's edge, many are offering prayers — including this woman.
Issei Kato Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:33 am

"The conduct of the captain and some crew members is wholly unfathomable from the viewpoint of common sense, and it was like an act of murder that cannot and should not be tolerated."

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Around the Nation
6:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Miss America Asks School To Reconsider Student's Punishment

When Miss America visited Patrick Farves high school, he asked her to the prom. She can't go, and the school punished him for asking. But she reportedly asked the school to rethink the suspension.

Around the Nation
6:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Florida Proposes New Rules Regarding Alligators

A state commission proposed a ban on selling stuffed baby alligators in "unnatural positions." It's designed to discourage baby gator hunting. If passed, no more little gators waving on a surfboard.

NPR Story
6:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

GM To Boost Car Production In China

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts on the road in China.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The Beijing Auto Show is underway and among the big announcements is this: General Motors says it will boost its production in China. GM said yesterday it will be able to produce five million cars per year by the end of 2015. It sold just over three million vehicles in China last year.

NPR Story
6:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

Business
6:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Honda Introduces Asimo To North America

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Asimo is Honda's latest humanoid robot. This one, the third version, is more life-like than previous models.

News
5:56 am
Mon April 21, 2014

The Boston Marathon Through The Eyes Of Two Men Who Love It

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray (right) greets runners during the Boston Athletic Association 10K race in Boston last year.
Aram Boghosian Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:32 pm

Dave McGillivray likely knows the Boston Marathon better than anyone else.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

It's Time To Run Again In Boston: Here's The Schedule

Runners, their friends and family members posed Sunday for photos at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, which is being run on Monday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:15 am

We don't need to go on at length about why today's running of the Boston Marathon is important.

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Army's Updated Rules On Hair Styles Tangle With Race

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Army has new rules on the dress and appearance of soldiers. The rules clamp down on tattoos, mohawks, long fingernails, dental ornamentation. So, diamond-studded teeth not allowed.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Army is also banning some hairstyles popular among African-American women. The stated goal here is professionalism, but some soldiers and even members of the Congressional Black Caucus are upset, and they are urging the Obama administration to take a second look at the rules.

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NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Dominated By 1 Point Of View, Late-Night TV Needs New Voices

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

On Tuesday, Stephen Colbert stops by the CBS Late Show to greet the man he'll replace next year, David Letterman. It also spotlights a reality in late-night TV --almost every host is a white man.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Transcendence': Latest Sci-Fi Movie About Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:25 am

Transcendence is an ambitious and provocative film about the perils and pleasures of artificial intelligence that is intriguingly balanced between being a warning and a celebration.

NPR Story
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter Dies At 76

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hurricane Carter has died. He was 76 years old, a former boxer, a figure of controversy and, for some, a cause. Rubin Carter was his given name. He fought his first professional boxing match the day after he was released from prison in 1961. Later and more famously, he was in trouble with the law again, including on the night in 1966, when a triple murder was committed in Patterson, New Jersey.

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Code Switch
4:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

Rep. Mike Honda (left) walks down the House steps with Rep. Raul Ruiz after a vote at the Capitol on March 20, 2013.
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 10:41 pm

In the heated race for a congressional seat in northern California, Mai Xuan Nguyen fought for her candidate with another cold call.

"Yes, that's K, H, A, N, N, A," she patiently explained in Vietnamese to a potential voter, spelling out her choice for Congress, Democrat Ro Khanna, as she marked her call list one recent evening at a coffeehouse in San Jose, Calif.

It was all part of Nguyen's role in an only-in-America scene: a Vietnamese-language phone bank for an Indian-American lawyer, who's challenging a Japanese-American congressman.

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All Tech Considered
2:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:01 pm

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
2:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 1:15 pm

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all of this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
2:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:43 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Shots - Health News
2:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records, allowing orthopedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:43 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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Around the Nation
2:39 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Watchdog's New Target: Embattled LA Sheriff's Department

Prosecutor Max Huntsman delivers his closing arguments in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city manager of Bell, Calif., in November. Huntsman's new challenge is to monitor the scandal-ridden LA County Sheriff's Department.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:59 pm

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is one of the nation's most troubled law enforcement agencies.

Eighteen current and former deputies are facing felony charges as part of a federal probe into allegations of widespread prisoner abuse in county jails. The federal government is also investigating alleged cases of deputies on patrol using excessive force during routine traffic stops, and targeting blacks and Latinos.

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News
4:12 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

In South Korea, Ferry Rescue Efforts Yield Only Grisly Results

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 5:43 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It has been a grim Easter Sunday for relatives of passengers who were on the ferry that capsized off the coast of South Korea on Wednesday. The death toll from that disaster is now over 50, with about 240 people still missing, most of them high school students. Today, divers started retrieving bodies from inside the vessel.

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National Security
4:07 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Hey, Kids, Remember You're On Our Side: The FBI Makes A Movie

YouTube

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 5:43 pm

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Deceptive Cadence
4:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Honey, Blood And Harmony: Jordi Savall's Balkan Journey

Early music specialist Jordi Savall has turned his attention to the widely varied music of the Balkans. "For me," he says, "it's one of the most exciting projects that happened in the last 20 years."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:42 pm

Jordi Savall has made a career of reviving ancient music. Whatever the age of the songs, though, he doesn't play them as museum-piece recreations, preserved in isolation. Savall takes great pleasure in smashing together music from different times and different cultures.

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Around the Nation
4:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years.
Linda Lutton WBEZ

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 5:43 pm

In a classroom across from the coal mine exhibit at the Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, students are huddled around tables, studying petri dishes of bacteria.

But these aren't school-age kids — these students are all teachers, responsible for imparting science to upper-elementary or middle-school students.

That's a job that many here — and many teachers in grammar schools around the country — feel unprepared for.

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