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Shots - Health News
4:09 am
Sun April 13, 2014

My Journey From Homeless Drug Addict To Magna Cum Laude

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

I was fighting a rat for the remnants of a corn dog I'd salvaged from the trash. That's when I realized I'd crossed the final line I had drawn.

I had told myself, as long as I don't shoot up, I'm OK. As long as I'm not homeless, I'm OK. But now I was shooting up and homeless, and there was nowhere left to draw. I had reached the bottom line of my existence.

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The Salt
3:45 am
Sun April 13, 2014

A Love Letter To Matzo: Why The Holey Cracker Is A Crunch Above

The holes in matzo give the cracker its characteristic crunch,
Odelia Cohen iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:57 pm

Passover is nearly upon us. And for many observers of the Jewish faith, that means saying goodbye to leavened bread.

In the place of leavened bread comes what many Jews call the "bread of affliction," or matzo. Passover commemorates the exodus of the Jews from Egypt. And as the biblical narrative goes, they had to leave in such a hurry that they couldn't wait for their bread to rise.

So the matzo at Passover is symbolic. But the plain, dry crackers tend to get a bad rap for their taste (or lack thereof).

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Africa
3:43 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Pray Or Prey? Cameroon's Pentecostal Churches Face Crackdown

Pentecostal worshipers sit at Ministry Faith Banner's overflow section on a street corner in Douala.
Andres Caballero NPR

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 5:54 pm

There's a saying in Cameroon that you can't drive for more than 100 yards without coming across a "revival church" or "new church" — terms used to refer to Pentecostal churches.

And even when you can't see them, you can probably hear them.

That's the case on a recent Sunday morning in Douala, the country's largest city, where the sound from the loudspeakers at Faith Ministry Banner church clashes with that of passing moto-taxis.

Dozens of worshipers stand under a blue overflow tent that extends from the church all the way to the sidewalk.

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Religion
3:43 am
Sun April 13, 2014

Statue Of A Homeless Jesus Startles A Wealthy Community

The Rev. David Buck sits next to the Jesus the Homeless statue that was installed in front of his church, St. Alban's Episcopal, in Davidson, N.C.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 7:40 am

A new religious statue in the town of Davidson, N.C., is unlike anything you might see in church.

The statue depicts Jesus as a vagrant sleeping on a park bench. St. Alban's Episcopal Church installed the homeless Jesus statue on its property in the middle of an upscale neighborhood filled with well-kept townhomes.

Jesus is huddled under a blanket with his face and hands obscured; only the crucifixion wounds on his uncovered feet give him away.

The reaction was immediate. Some loved it; some didn't.

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Sports
5:45 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

By Helping Gay Athletes, Group Hopes To Refocus On Talent

Massachusetts' Derrick Gordon (No. 2) drives past Northern Illinois' Dontel Highsmith (No. 4) and Travon Baker (No. 5) during an NCAA basketball game in Amherst, Mass., on Dec. 14.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:50 pm

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Fresh Air Weekend
5:21 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: 'Nurse Jackie,' 'Mad Men' And 'Frozen'

Edie Falco plays ER nurse Jackie Peyton, who is competent at her high-stress job but struggles with addiction. The sixth season of Nurse Jackie starts Sunday on Showtime.
Ken Regan Showtime

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 3:30 pm

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Edie Falco On Sobriety, The Sopranos, And Nurse Jackie's Self-Medication: Falco plays ER nurse Jackie Peyton, who is competent at her high-stress job but struggles with addiction. The sixth season of Nurse Jackie begins Sunday on Showtime.

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The Salt
4:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

When Your Child's Food Allergies Are A Matter Of Life And Death

Laurel Francoeur's son Jeremy is severely allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, sesame and shellfish.
Courtesy of Laurel Francoeur

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 5:46 pm

Laurel Francoeur's son Jeremy was about a year old when he had his first life- threatening allergic reaction. She took him to the doctor when hives started to cover his whole body. Tests revealed severe allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, sesame and shellfish.

Like many parents of children with severe food allergies, Francoeur faces a host of unique challenges.

"It's a lot of planning," she says. "You have to always plan where you're going, how you're going to eat when you get there. Will the food be safe? Will he have something to eat?"

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Technology
4:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Diagnosing And Treating The Internet's Heartbleed Bug

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 5:44 pm

Encryption software meant to protect users online had a giant hole in it. Researchers found the Heartbleed bug Monday but Jordan Robertson from Bloomberg Businessweek tells guest host Tess Vigeland says it's been around for a while.

Sports
4:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

What You May Have Missed: The Week's Sports Wrapup

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 5:44 pm

The Masters is well under way and A Martinez from member station KPCC is here to talk golf with guest host Tess Vigeland. Plus, Kentucky coach John Calipari's new book and the future of the NCAA.

World
4:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

With Crimean Borders In Dispute, Google Maps Has It Both Ways

On Russia's Google Maps service, Crimea is separated from Ukraine by a solid line.
google.ru

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 5:44 pm

In most of the world, the region is included in Russia with a dotted line. Viewed in Russia, the line is solid. Guest host Tess Vigeland speaks with John Gravois about the issues with mapping borders.

The Two-Way
4:10 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

U.S. Agency Backs Down In Standoff With Cattle Rancher

Rancher Cliven Bundy (center) walks with his grandson Braxton Louge along with armed security guards near his ranch house Friday. Bundy's ranch, west of Mesquite, Nev., has become a rallying point for protesters who back his fight against the Bureau of Land Management over grazing fees.
George Frey Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 13, 2014 11:19 am

Cliven Bundy, a Nevada rancher who refuses to pay grazing fees for the use of federally protected land, seems to have won at least a reprieve in his fight against the Bureau of Land Management. The agency has reportedly rounded up hundreds of Bundy's cows and impounded them.

The BLM announced Saturday that it will stop its operation targeting Bundy's cattle, citing safety concerns. But officials maintain that the rancher still owes more than $1 million in unpaid fees that date back more than 20 years.

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The Two-Way
2:58 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

In Australia, A Minute Of Silence Is Being Sold To Help Vets

Remembrance poppies honoring veterans cover a shrine in Wellington, New Zealand, on a recent April 25, when Australia and New Zealand mark ANZAC Day. A new campaign urges people to buy a minute of silence to support veterans.
Hagen Hopkins Getty Images

They're selling silence in Australia. But before you start thinking that means things are too noisy Down Under, know this: The Minute of Silence was recorded as current and former members of Australia's military stood by, in honor of their fallen comrades. The silence is being sold for a little over $2 to raise money to help veterans.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

A Google Maps image from its Russian service depicts Crimea (bottom center) with a solid line, reflecting an international border between it and Ukraine. Versions of the map on other Google sites show it with a dotted line.
Google Maps

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:49 pm

The U.S. sees Crimea as "occupied territory," as the government said in a recent statement. But in Russia, Google Maps now shows the peninsula as part of Russian territory. America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.

A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country.

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The Two-Way
10:25 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Bus Crash Tragedy: Investigators Work As Communities Mourn

The remains of a FedEx truck (right) and a bus involved in a crash Thursday are taken from the scene of the accident in Orland, Calif., by flatbed trucks on Friday. The students had been on their way to visit Humboldt State University in Northern California.
Elijah Nouvelage Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 11:32 am

Investigators don't know what caused a deadly highway crash that killed 10 people Thursday after a FedEx truck hit a bus that was taking teenagers to tour a college campus in Northern California. It could be months before they have answers, officials say.

The crash triggered explosions and a fire that reportedly killed five students and five adults (the two vehicles' drivers, in addition to three people associated with the college program). Some survivors have said they're alive because they managed to get out of windows and get clear of the blast.

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Europe
9:55 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Between Friends, Family And Country, Ukrainian Police Lie Low

Pro-Russian activists sit at a barricade at the regional administration building in Donetsk on Wednesday. Police have been conspicuously absent at Eastern Ukraine protest sites.
Efrem Lukatsky AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:33 pm

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All Tech Considered
9:49 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Tech Week: Heartbleed, The Latest Bubble And Windows XP Retires

Each new billion-dollar IPO is raising the speculation that another tech bubble will soon burst.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:50 pm

Site administrators were sent scrambling this week when researchers disclosed the potentially catastrophic Heartbleed bug, a coding error that left much of the Internet vulnerable to data theft since March 2012. Here's our look back at Heartbleed coverage — and more.

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Deceptive Cadence
9:14 am
Sat April 12, 2014

A Debut Symphony That Embraced The World

Gustav Mahler wanted each of his symphonies to contain a world of emotions and ideas.
Library of Congress

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Conducting Gustav Mahler's First Symphony is an exhilarating and demanding task. Although it's one of his shortest symphonies (at about 55 minutes), it is an epic journey that requires countless hours of analysis and examination of the score. Still, it is a thrilling process to peel back and reassemble the many layers of Mahler's music.

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Africa
9:02 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Pentecostal Churches Accused Of Exploiting Cameroon's Poor

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Pentecostalism is the fastest-growing Christian denomination in the world. It has spread swiftly through sub-Saharan Africa, which is now home to nearly 45 percent of all of Pentecostals. In Cameroon, a mainly Christian nation that sits in the crook of West Africa, the church's explosive growth has attracted government attention and ire. Andres Caballero reports.

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Africa
8:56 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Guineans Scramble To Defend Themselves Against Deadly Virus

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

A recent outbreak of Ebola in Guinea has the country on edge. Guineans have never experienced the deadly virus, and are learning quickly how to protect themselves.

Latin America
8:54 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Jailed In Cuba Since 2009, USAID Contractor On Hunger Strike

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Alan Gross is already in frail health after spending more than four years in a Cuban prison. This week, he went on a hunger strike, but ended it after a few days. Mr. Gross is the USAID contractor who was arrested in Cuba in 2009 and accused of espionage. He was working to provide Internet access to Cuba's Jewish community. Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic and Bloomberg View has been reporting on the Alan Gross story, joins us in our studios. Jeff, thanks so much for being with us.

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The Two-Way
8:43 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Pakistani Court Tosses Out Attempted Murder Charge Against Baby

Pakistani toddler Mohammad Musa, seen here sitting in his grandfather Muhammad Yasin's lap after a court hearing in Lahore. A court threw out charges of attempted murder against the toddler Saturday.
Arif Ali AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:33 pm

Weeks after he was fingerprinted and appeared in court on an attempted murder charge, baby Mohammad Musa Khan is no longer living under the shadow of a criminal conviction. His case has been termed absurd, ridiculous and a sign of a justice system in need of reform.

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Your Money
8:21 am
Sat April 12, 2014

IRS Chasing Children For Dead Parents' Debts

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Economy
8:20 am
Sat April 12, 2014

After Austerity, British Economy Declared World's Fastest-Growing

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Sometimes economics are turned on their head. Now, for years, Britain has had controversial austerity measures in place. Olivier Blanchard, the International Monetary Fund's chief economist, likened them to playing with fire. This past week, the IMF published its World Economic Forecast and concluded the fastest-growing economy of any rich country in the world is Britain's. Britain's Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, led the U.K.'s austerity measures.

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Book News & Features
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

So You Need A Celebrity Book. Who Ya Gonna Call? Ghostwriters

You might not notice their names on their book covers — and sometimes they're not named at all. But ghostwriters don't mind the anonymity.
Hobvias Sudoneighm (striatic) Flickr

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:33 pm

The next time you're in a bookstore, take a look at the nonfiction shelf. See all those celebrity autobiographies — the memoirs of actors, athletes and politicians? Chances are, they're the work of a ghostwriter.

David Fisher is one of those invisible authors. He's ghostwritten over 70 books, adopting the voices of quarterback Terry Bradshaw, attorney Johnnie Cochran and actor and comedian Leslie Nielsen, among others.

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Author Interviews
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Jackie Collins' Mob Princess Serves Up A Cookbook You Can't Refuse

Courtesy of St. Martin's Press

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:52 pm

Lucky Santangelo is a household name — at least, in those households where the shelves are packed with Jackie Collins novels. And considering there are more than 500 million copies sold, well, Santangelo's certainly got a fan base.

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Around the Nation
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

A Year After Bombings, Boston Comes Back 'Strong'

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

PGA Puts On A Masters Without Tiger

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. I look forward all week to saying it's time for sports. The tigers without master - the Masters without Tiger? You know, it's so hard to imagine, I can barely say it. And the Indiana Pacers are swooning like Justin Bieber fans this week. We're joined now by NPR's Tom Goldman. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

SIMON: So there was a slight glimmer of hope that the Pacers could be coming out of a tailspin, but alas...

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NPR Story
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

School Lunch: Any Chicken In Those 'Food-Like Nubbins'?

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

It took a Freedom of Information Act to get the Chicago Public Schools to disclose what's in the chicken nuggets they serve in their cafeterias. NPR's Scott Simon reveals the chemical contents.

NPR Story
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

A Sheep Killer Is On The Loose In 'All the Birds, Singing'

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 12:26 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Parallels
8:04 am
Sat April 12, 2014

Iran's Culture Wars: Who's Winning These Days?

Members of the Iranian band Accolade perform in an unauthorized stage performance in the capital Tehran in January 2013. Those seeking greater social freedoms are often testing the limits in Iran.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 12:49 pm

In Iran, hardline critics are waging a campaign against President Hassan Rouhani to limit his campaign pledge of opening Iran to more social and cultural freedoms.

The "culture wars" are as old as the Islamic revolution that swept conservative clerics to power more than three decades ago. The latest chapter comes as Rouhani is negotiating a nuclear deal with six world powers. He has the backing of Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, to continue the nuclear discussions, but cultural hardliners are stepping up the domestic pressure.

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