news media

Luc De Leeuw / flickr

On this segment of River to River, media political economist Robert McChesney has a bleak assessment of our new age of internet journalism.

Daniel Rehn

When University of Iowa associate professor Kembrew McLeod wrote in protest of the university's pink locker room, he expected some hate-mail, but he was not prepared for how much the comments would hurt.

Responses like "I speak for the state of Iowa in saying that we detest you at a molecular level" and "Honestly, I do hope this guy gets beat up" can really "wear on one’s psyche," he says.

Milosz Reterski / Navy NewsStand

Robin Williams's death has dominated news coverage in the past week. But how much of that coverage has been helpful and how much as been harmful?

Martin Cathrae/Creative Commons

When you ask people what is important to eat, they'll tell you vegetables.  When you quietly watch, they'll mostly eat candy.  It turns out the same is true of news.  The launching board for our conversation is a new study showing that while people consistently rank news coverage of international news, business and politics as being most important to their lives, an analysis of their online behavior tells a different story.  The study sparked this recent article in

Wikimedia Commons

After a 130 year run, Ladies Home Journal is drastically reducing its publication schedule and ending its subscription service, another in a long line of women’s magazines to try and reinvent itself or discontinue publication in the digital age.

Nationally syndicated columnist Leonard Pitts, Jr. says extremist Islam is afraid of little girls.  More specifically, he writes, they're afraid of the women they will become.  The 2004 Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary talks with Host Ben Kieffer about some of his recent writings, including his latest novel, Freeman and why opinion writing is still important.

K.H. Sidey / Adair County Free Press

For 125 years, four generations of the Sidey family have delivered the news of Adair County.  While many small, independently owned papers perished or became parts of large conglomerates the Adair County Free Press persisted.

Bill Read

The internet has changed how we find information, get news, connect with friends, and for many people it also has changed the experience with faith and religion.  Guests include Elizabeth Drescher from Santa Clara University, L. Edward Philips from Emory University, and author, editor, and lecturer Phyllis Tickle.

Nathan Gibbs

On this River to River program, host Ben Kieffer talks with NPR host and special correspondent Michele Norris who will discuss her Race Card Project and how it has become much broader in scope since she launched it. Norris will be speaking Wednesday at Coe College.

Then, a conversation with award-winning broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien about race and identity as reflected in the media. Her parents had to leave Maryland in 1958 to get married due to that state’s laws against interracial marriage.

European Parliament

In the second half of today's River To River, we take a look at news literacy, especially for future generations. Iowa author and former reporter Colleen Branford Krantz joins us to discuss a new mobile app she designed to help schools and parents teach young students how to navigate the news, called News Tutor.

Mike Pace is probably best known as the former emcee for the Powerball drawings.  He also has been the host of the Iowa Realty Sunday Home Show in central Iowa, and he has a weekly radio show on KRNT.  Join host Charity Nebbe for a talk with Mike Pace about his new collection of poetry, Dreams and Detours: Reflecting on the Souvenirs of a Lifetime.

Raising Girls

Oct 10, 2013
Joe Lencioni

From Cinderella to Miley Cyrus our girls grow up in an environment rich in images of femininity.  Host Charity Nebbe gets insight into the challenges and dangers girls face as they grow and how the media influences their development.

Iowa Public Radio has named three finalists for its executive director position.

According to a press release, the finalists are:

Debra J. Fraser, former Chief Operating Officer and Station Manager at Houston Public Media; Myrna Johnson, Executive Director for the Boston Schoolyard Initiative; and William R. Reed, a former private-sector media executive and Midwest-based marketing consultant.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Does drinking coffee prevent dementia? Will diet soda give you cancer?  Science and health reporting is often misleading and confusing.

Jason A. Howie / Flickr

There are a lot of ways to share information online, so it's not surprising that some people are oversharing. Host Charity Nebbe chats about social media etiquette with Andrew High, assistant professor at the University of Iowa's Department for Communication Studies, and Nathan Wright, founder of the digital media consulting firm Lava Row.

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

One of Iowa's most strategic pieces of of real estate is up for sale; The Des Moines Register is preparing to vacate its long time headquarters next month. Now, nearly a hundred years of history is making news again. We take a tour and listen to old recordings.

Flickr / The U.S. Army

More than 60,000 US troops are still in Afghanistan. What hurdles does the US face as that international military operation winds down? Today on "River to River" National Security Analyst Brian Katulis from the Center for American Progress will talk about US withdraw from Afghanistan.  He'll also comment on the status of Iraq, ten years after the start of the Iraq War.

Michael Newman / flickr

We've all heard that it's best to limit the amount of screen time our kids get each day, but screens are getting harder an harder to avoid. Today on Talk of Iowa, we talk about educational media. We find out how to make the most of the screen time our kids do get and explore some of the surprising pitfalls we can find along the way.

Iowa Public Radio’s top leader, Mary Grace Herrington, has been fired by the organization’s board of directors. The board voted 6-1 Tuesday to dismiss Herrington. She had been the organization’s chief executive officer since 2009.

The lone dissenter, Mark Braun, is a new IPR board member and the interim Vice President for Strategic Communications at the University of Iowa. 

Center for American Progress / Flickr

Host Ben Kieffer talks with UI psychiatrist and professor of medicine Donald Black about his views on proposed changes in mental health policy as a potential remedy for reducing gun violence. Dr. Black is well known for studying various personality disorders. Also psychologist Craig Anderson of ISU tells us about research on the connections between virtual media violence and real life violence.

Daniel Schildt / Flickr

In recent years, partisan publications and blogs are becoming more of a resource for voters. Host Ben Kieffer explores the impact niche political news organizations have on elections, specifically with this year’s presidential election. Journalism professor, Frank Durham, and political science professor, Tim Hagle join the discussion, as well as representatives of partisan news sites across the state.

Media Violence

Sep 6, 2012
FireFish45 / Flickr

Ever wonder if consuming media violence makes someone more likely to act out violence in real life? On River to River, we’ll examine a new report by Iowa State psychology professors Craig Anderson and Douglas Gentile that says violent images such as scenes in movies, games or pictures in comic books, act as triggers for activating aggressive thoughts and feelings already stored in memory. Also, what can parents do about it?

Brandon Warren / flickr

When someone is trying to lie to you in  face-to-face exchange, you may be able to tell by their shifting eyes.  But what if that deception comes in text communication or in an email?  We listen back to Ben’s conversation with Joey George, an Iowa State University professor of Management Information Systems.  He’s studied computer mediated deceptive communication and will tell us how we’re learning to lie digitally.  Then, a look at the Ames Laboratory and patents developed there- including a 40-million dollar lead-free solder patent.  In 2011, the patent become the top royalty income gener

We all realize the media landscape is changing very quickly. But where are we headed? And have you ever considered putting yourself on a media diet?  We’d originally scheduled Governor Branstad to join us live today. However, late this morning, the Governor’s office let us know that he now has a scheduling conflict. We’ll try to reschedule that conversation for a future date.

Instead today, we’ll listen back to conversation about changes in the media with Executive Director of the Iowa Broadcast News Association Jeff Stein.

The Inn at Irish Hollow

Cell phones, computers, televisions – they seem to be everywhere we go. Join host Ben Kieffer as we explore an effort by the Tri-State Tourism Council promoting technology-free getaways in eastern Iowa, southwest Wisconsin, and northwest Illinois.