Neuroscience

Emily Woodbury

March is Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) awareness month. TBI has been called a silent epidemic. In many cases, resulting injuries are not visible to others, and it affects more than 95,000 Iowans.

cobalt123 / flickr

Epilepsy affects millions; and yet, the cause of the neurological disorder is in most cases is unknown.

Also unknown are the details of the leading cause of death from epilepsy, what medical professionals call "sudden unexpected death from epilepsy" or SUDEP. Recently, University of Iowa neurologists have been chosen to join only 8 other groups around the world to study SUDEP.

chandrika221 / flickr

The drama of mood swings, impulsiveness and bizarre behaviors during adolescence
can take a toll on both teens and their parents.

Emily Woodbury

Andrew Duarte was only 31 years old when he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. One of the biggest questions he had was, “What can I expect?”

“And there’s not really a good answer for that,” he says.

Today on Talk of Iowa - living with Parkinson’s disease. Host Charity Nebbe sits down with two Parkinson's patients and a clinical researcher to talk about recent developments in Parkinson’s research and find out what it’s like to live with the disease.

Steve Harris

Thanks to new legislation, a definition of dyslexia will now be included in the Iowa Code.  The neurological condition, which often runs in families, causes individuals difficultly with learning to read, write and spell.

The law is the result of strong advocacy from a number of groups, including the parent-lead, grassroots organization Decoding Dyslexia. DD aims to bring attention to educational intervention for dyslexic students.

chandrika221 / flickr

The drama of mood swings, impulsiveness and bizarre behaviors during adolescence
can take a toll on both teens and their parents. Neuropsychiatrist and bestselling author Dr. Daniel Siegel says that there is a lot of misinformation about this developmental period.

“There are common myths that we all hear about…that are actually not only wrong, they’re misleading and in some ways they’re disempowering.  So by learning the truths you can actually understand things as they actually are and then do something about them.”

Fredler Brave

Technology, culture and economics writer Nicholas Carr’s most recent book "The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains" was a 2011 Pulitzer Prize nominee. He speaks with host Ben Kieffer about why he doesn't have a smartphone and how the internet is changing our society.

Stephen Hampshire

The criminal brain has always held a fascination for neuroscientist James Fallon.  A few years ago, he inadvertently discovered his brain scan perfectly matched a pattern that he’d found in the brains of serial killers. Today on River to River, host Ben Kieffer talks with Fallon.

Ars Electronica / flickr

Do you ever wonder why, at a loud party, you are able to comprehend what the person next to you is saying? It’s not because they are louder… It’s due to your brain’s ability to filter and hone in on certain stimuli.

Today on River To River, we focus on the science of the brain with three prominent neuroscientists visiting Iowa. Host Ben Kieffer talks with them about their research on the sense of sound and gets their thoughts on the latest brain-science news.

Recently, President Obama unveiled an expansive research initiative intended to redefine how we understand the human brain. Today on River To River, host Ben Kieffer talks brain science with Daniel Tranel, director of a unique Iowa registry that tracks patients who’ve experienced brain damage, the Iowa Neurological Patient Registry. Ben also talks with a brain trauma survivor, his wife, and the therapy manager for the non-profit, On With Life. They explore what it is like to live day-to-day after an unexpected brain injury.

Geral Blanchard spent 35 years working as a counselor. He embraced modern theory and practices. Then, he traveled to Africa. One encounter with a shaman changed his world forever. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Blanchard about that encounter, the journey it began, and his book, Ancient Ways: Indigenous Healing Innovations for the 21st Century.