Here and Now

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

Congress is expected to unveil a plan today to address Puerto Rico’s debt crisis, but environmentalists are anxious about a possible rider in the bill that would relinquish federal control of a national wildlife refuge on the island of Vieques. Representative Robert Bishop, chairman of the house natural resources committee, wants the federal government to give up a 3,100-acre chunk of the refuge, which is home to 16 endangered species and hosts hundreds of species of birds as they migrate across the Caribbean.

Diane Guerrero is a successful actress with roles on the Netflix prison series “Orange is the New Black” and the CW’s “Jane the Virgin.” But when she was 14, her future looked bleak: She returned from school to find that her parents, undocumented immigrants from Colombia, had been taken by immigration officials. They were detained and deported. Diane saw them infrequently over the next decade as she struggled to make a life for herself.

Heat Wave And Drought Hit India

May 10, 2016

Note: This BBC interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

The Science And Culture Of Picky Eating

May 10, 2016

What foods do you love that other people just cannot stomach?

Google tracked food-related searches over the past two years, and found our tastes are as fickle as ever. Trending ingredients included pork shoulder, cauliflower rice, and cheese curds. That list may make your mouth water, or you might find it nauseating.

As of Monday morning, you can no longer get Uber or Lyft in Austin, Texas. Both companies have suspended service there indefinitely, after residents voted this weekend to keep a new city law that regulates ride-sharing services and requires them, among other things, to fingerprint drivers as part of the background check process.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Nathan Bernier, reporter and host at Here & Now contributor KUT, about the vote and about how people in Austin are reacting.

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell is scheduled to attend a listening session in New York this week to hear activists and local officials make the case for the first national monument to the gay rights movement.

The tiny hummingbird often moves people to attempt daring feats to rescue birds they believe are in distress. But sometimes these efforts can do more harm than good and are much more involved than most people might realize.

The species known as Brood V cicadas will soon come out in parts of Ohio, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia, after being underground for 17 years. These periodical cicadas have an inborn molecular clock. They will emerge when the temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit at eight inches beneath the ground.

Chris Simon, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Connecticut – Storrs, talks to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about the fascinating history and behavior of cicadas.

Fundraising walks, like the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure and the AVON Walk to End Breast Cancer, attract millions of participants and raise tens of millions of dollars.

Facing a cash shortage, Zimbabwe’s central bank governor John Mangudya announced Thursday that the bank will begin printing its own version of the U.S. dollar. Zimbabwe has already been using the U.S. dollar after abandoning its own currency in 2009 because of hyperinflation.

Now the bank will print bond notes that will have the same value as their U.S. dollar equivalents. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with economics journalist Ali Velshi about what’s behind the change.

With Donald Trump’s decisive victory Tuesday night in Indiana, the candidate’s supporters are celebrating his new status as the party’s likely nominee in Cleveland this July. North Dakota’s Congressman Kevin Cramer, who conducted his own straw poll because the state party didn’t hold a caucus or a primary, backs Trump and explains why. He speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

On this week’s DJ session, KCRW’s Raul Campos highlights what’s spinning in his head, including self-professed “southern fried soul” ban, The Echocentrics of Austin and young LA-based dance duo Classixx. He also shares new music from Brett Dennen and DJ Shadow with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Songs in the Segment

“Staring At The Ceiling” (feat. James Petralli) by The Echocentrics (Echo Hotel, 2016)

[Youtube]

“Cassidy” by Brett Dennen (Por Favor, 2016)

The teen clothing retailer Aeropostale filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday, and announced that it would close 113 stores in the U.S., amid changing shopping habits by its customers. Also this week, the parent company of the grocery chain Fairway, in New York, Connecticut and New Jersey, announced its own Chapter 11 bankruptcy, as the store group faces competition from the likes of Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake about what’s behind the bankruptcies.

A Guide To Herbs For Your Garden And Table

May 3, 2016

Now that it’s spring, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says herbs are a must-have for would-be gardeners and cooks. With host Robin Young, Kathy runs through some of her favorite herbs and shares a few recipes that showcase them:

Many people go to natural history museums to look at dinosaur bones or dioramas of earlier times. But these museums can also house vast collections of fossils used by researchers to study our past. For decades, the only way to know what’s in a collection was to sift through it in person. But now, L.A. County’s Natural History Museum is hoping to change that by bringing their fossils online. KPCC’s Sanden Totten reports.

President Obama will visit Flint, Michigan on Wednesday, where he’ll meet with residents who have been living with lead-tainted tap water for more than two years. Eight-year old Flint resident Mari Copeny will be one of them. Mari, who earned the nickname Little Miss Flint in her community for her activism, wrote to Obama in March, telling him how she’s been trying to help her city, and saying she would love to meet him or Michelle Obama.

Keeping The Navajo Language Relevant

May 2, 2016

As the largest tribe in the country, more Navajos speak their mother tongue than any other indigenous language in the U.S. But the Navajo language is still considered endangered. Each year, fewer Navajo children speak it. Laurel Morales from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports that there’s a new effort to not only preserve the language, but to revive it.

Listen to more of KJZZ’s coverage of the Navajo language here.

In an era where big sports titles most often go to the wealthiest teams, England’s modest Leicester City Foxes are defying the odds. Specifically 5,000-1 odds. The team that Sports Illustrated calls, “arguably the wildest underdog story in the history of professional sports,” is just one game away from being crowned champions of the English Premier League. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Grant Wahl of Sports Illustrated’s Planet Fútbol about what makes the Foxes such unlikely champions, and what needs to happen to make that dream a reality.

The Pros And Cons Of A Gap Year

May 2, 2016

The White House says Malia Obama will attend Harvard University in fall, 2017 after taking a gap year. Once more common among European college students, a number of American students are now taking a year off between high school and college. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks to college counselor Lisa Micele about why some students take gap years, what they do what their time, and how colleges view students who decide to take that year off.

Femi Oke of Al Jazeera English joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss stories currently getting traction on social media.

As the Republican nominating contest turns into a race for delegates and not just votes, some might ask why we even have delegates. Shouldn’t a popular vote suffice? Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Richard Pacelle, professor of political science at the University of Tennessee, to find some answers.

The crew of the Air Force warplane that destroyed a hospital in Kunduz, Afghanistan last year did not have access to the “no-strike list” that specifically forbade targeting it, a Pentagon report says today. But the Pentagon says that lapse and the airstrike that killed more than 40 people at the Doctors Without Borders hospital was “caused by a combination of human errors” – not by deliberate action. That’s why US officials say the strike is not a “war crime,” as Doctors Without Borders and other critics have charged.

The odds of making a full recovery following a stroke aren’t great. Nearly half of all people who survive end up either needing permanent assistance to perform basic functions, or wind up in a nursing home.

Physical rehabilitation exercises post-stroke can help people recover use of a damaged limb, but there’s a growing belief that the typical exercises and routines aren’t providing enough repetitions.

From Capitol Hill To The Silver Screen

Apr 28, 2016

In the new film “The Congressman,” actor Treat Williams plays Charlie Winship, a Vietnam-era veteran turned U.S. congressman. The plot is based on the real life of Robert Mrazek, who represented Long Island, New York, from 1983 to 1993. But, as he tells Here & Now’s Robin Young, he always wanted to be a filmmaker.

The Commerce Department reported today that the U.S. economy grew at its slowest quarterly rate in two years, with the GDP expanding just 0.5 percent. Consumers are cutting back on spending, and businesses on investments, as Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine explains to Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

Six people have been diagnosed with measles in the Memphis area in less than a week. That’s more cases in just a few days than the entire country had seen so far in 2016.

There are also several outbreaks of mumps right now, including at universities in Indiana, Ohio and Massachusetts. At Harvard University alone, at least 40 people have been diagnosed in the last couple of months.

DJ Sessions: Improvising In Harlem

Apr 27, 2016

When you think of musical improvisation, classical music probably does not come to mind. But WQXR classical music DJ Terrance McKnight tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson that there’s a lot of it going on right now, particularly in the classical music coming out of Harlem.

Apple’s stock was falling Wednesday, after the company reported its first quarterly drop in earnings in 13 years on Tuesday. Exxon Mobil also this week saw its credit rating drop for the first time since the Great Depression. And Chipotle reported a double-digit sales drop in the first quarter of this year. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Curt Nickisch of the Harvard Business Review about what this week’s news means for these three companies.

While media giant Gannett tries to acquire the parent company of the Los Angeles Times and eight other daily newspapers, The New York Times says it will close its Paris editing and printing operations, eliminating 70 jobs. NPR’s David Folkenflik speaks with Here & Now‘s Robin Young about news in the print journalism world.

Pittsburgh has more than 440 bridges in its city – more than Venice, Italy – earning it the nickname the “City of Bridges.” For many residents, the bridges represent the city’s historic ties with industrial production, engineering and steel.

But at least 20 bridges are now labeled “structurally deficient” by state and local officials, often due to age and weather damage. The Liberty Bridge, which once carried an estimated 54,000 vehicles a day, is now undergoing a three-year reconstruction estimated to cost almost $90 million.

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