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Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

Twitter has released its third quarter earnings and, along with them, announced the layoff of around 350 employees.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Curt Nickisch, senior editor at Harvard Business Review, about why Twitter is struggling and what might be next for the company.

Sweet potatoes are a big part of many a holiday meal. But Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says that you can do so much more with them.

She brings Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson sweet potato chips, a puree and a chocolate cake made with a recipe from her friend and cookbook author Raghavan Iyer.

U.S.-sponsored peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians broke down two years ago. But very quietly, the Palestinian government in the West Bank has been running its own initiative to reach out to Israelis.

Reporter Daniel Estrin has more from the Palestinian city of Ramallah.


Daniel Estrin, reporter. He tweets @DanielEstrin.

As European and Asian investors seek out safe places to put their money, many are piling into the U.S. bond market.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with CNN’s Maggie Lake about what’s happening.

Secret Service Recruitment Campaign Amps Up

Oct 26, 2016

The U.S. Secret Service has an aggressive hiring campaign underway. But many qualified candidates are being disqualified from the application process because of their past illegal use of prescription drugs, including Adderall.

This comes at a time when the agency is stretched thin after several controversies, and the country is in the middle of a contentious presidential election.

For more, Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with USA Today reporter Kevin Johnson, who covers national law enforcement issues and the Justice Department.

If you’ve ever donated to a political candidate — or asked for information on a campaign website — you might find your email inbox flooded with fundraising appeals, perhaps from candidates you’ve never even heard of.

Dave Davies from Here & Now contributor WHYY took a look at what kind of messages we’re getting and why there are so many of them.

Amid low unemployment, retailers are scrambling to find enough holiday workers this year, leading employers to offer slightly higher wages. At least one company is offering the enticement of free lunch.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jason Bellini about the holiday hiring season.

Obamacare premiums are going up next year, the administration said Monday. People who buy health insurance through federal and state exchanges should expect to pay, on average, 22 percent more for a mid-level plan in 2017 than they did in 2016.

A number of insurers have also dropped out of the exchanges, meaning there will be fewer options for people to choose from in many states, too.

Manhunt Underway In Oklahoma

Oct 25, 2016

Police in Oklahoma have been searching for more than 24 hours for a man who police say stole a police car, killed two family members, shot four other people then started a Facebook Live broadcast while on the run. Michael Vance, who is 38, was recently released from jail, facing charges of child sex abuse.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young gets the latest from KGOU’s Kate Carlton Greer.

Remembering Activist And Author Tom Hayden

Oct 24, 2016

The author, journalist, politician and one of the organizers of the anti-war protests at the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, died yesterday in California. He was 76.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young had a chance to speak with Hayden at the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this summer. He had suffered a stroke and was in a wheelchair.

But while his body was failing him, his mind was not — Hayden was still speaking out. Today, we’re revisiting that conversation, which aired in July.

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Colorado almost three years ago has given way to an industry of dispensaries, including Native Roots, the largest marijuana chain and license holder in the state.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson met with owner and CEO Josh Ginsberg about how he has seen the industry evolve, and the challenges he continues to face under burdensome regulations.

There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming. But the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country.

Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts. Wyoming Public Radio’s Stephanie Joyce reports.

AT&T is in talks to acquire Time Warner, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal today.

Here & Now‘s Lisa Mullins talks with Bloomberg Gadfly’s Michael Regan about what’s happening.

The Parakeets Of Bakersfield, California

Oct 21, 2016

The California City of Bakersfield is known for country music, agriculture and oil. But what if someone told you people are flocking to the city to birdwatch?

That’s what Valley Public Radio’s Ezra David Romero discovered in a neighborhood park lined with tall trees.

Donald Trump is far behind Hillary Clinton among women voters.

In last night’s debate he had an opportunity to convince women to vote for him.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson talks with Michelle Bernard, president and CEO of the Bernard Center for Women, Politics, and Public Policy, about whether Trump was able to appeal to women.

Walk a few hundred yards into the woods in Durham, Connecticut these days and you’ll see something that looks like it’s out of “Mad Max.”

Large trucks with big wheels and giant robotic arms are grabbing trees and slicing them down.

But as Patrick Skahill from Here & Now contributor WNPR reports, this controlled chaos is a calculated timber harvest, with the long-term goal of creating a more resilient forest.

This month on NPR, we’ve been hearing from voters about identity and politics, as part of an election-year project called “A Nation Engaged.” We’re asking people “what it means to be an American” and “what can the next president do to further that vision?”

Today, we have answers to those questions from a Mexican American named Marisol Flores Aguirre from Tucson, Arizona, and Greg Locke, a preacher from Tennessee.

Tonight in Nevada presidential nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will debate for the third and final time before the election on Nov. 8.

It will be the first debate since Trump announced that “the shackles have been taken off.” So it remains to be seen how he’ll respond to Clinton, who holds a clear lead in national and most battleground state polls.

Sibling Economics In A Recession

Oct 19, 2016

Economic mobility is critical to achieving the American dream, which centers on the hope that our children will be better off than we are.

To measure how the country is doing against that goal, experts typically look at how families do from one generation to the next. But what happens when there are class disparities among siblings?

Emiliano Villa from Here & Now contributor Youth Radio has the story.

Emily Núñez Cavness was a student at Middlebury College — and the only member of the campus ROTC — when she formed the idea for the company she started with her sister, called Sword & Plough.

Now an active military officer and CEO, Cavness works to reuse military surplus to create bags and other accessories. Veterans are a big part of the process, from design to sales to the models on the company’s website.

Fifty-two years after President Lyndon Johnson declared his “War on Poverty,” 20 percent of the country’s 74 million children live below the poverty line — many well below.

The recently released 2015 U.S. Census data show some improvement over 2014, but those gains don’t affect the children who live in the poorest households.

North Korea recently completed its fifth ballistic missile launch. It’s a move that defies growing international consensus that views the secretive, nuclear-armed nation as a grave threat to international order.

While it’s received relatively little attention in the U.S. presidential campaign, North Korea could be the next president’s thorniest foreign policy problem, according to some international relations experts.

Movie star Burt Reynolds started acting in the 1960s and has made dozens of films since. He’s written a memoir that looks at his life and career, “But Enough About Me.”

He spoke with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson about his journey in film, and those who influenced him along the way.

Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner appears to be looking into setting up a Trump television network after the November election, according to reporting today from the Financial Times.

Christopher Guest’s new movie, “Mascots,” is out today on Netflix.

The “mockumentary” filmmaker has been using a set formula for two decades built on silly concepts and improvised scripts.

NPR movie critic Bob Mondello talks with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson about what makes the movies funny, and how the style has now found its way into other entertainment.

Note: The BBC portion of this interview can be heard in the Here & Now podcast or with the WBUR app.

Thailand’s prime minister has declared a one-year mourning period following the death of King Bhumibol Adulyadej.

One of the Republicans who is calling on Donald Trump to abandon his presidential bid is Rep. Will Hurd, a Republican who represents Texas’s 23rd congressional district. Hurd is also facing a tough race for re-election against Democrat Pete Gallego.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Aaron Schrank of Texas Public Radio about the race.

Britain's Pound Hits Historic Lows

Oct 12, 2016

The British pound hit a historic low Tuesday, touching a worth of $1.20, down from $1.55 last year.

The drop was brought on by continuing fears about Britain’s impending exit from the European Union.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sebastian Payne of the Financial Times about the drop, and the latest in the Brexit negotiations.

The continuing flow into the U.S. of Central American families and youth fleeing violence has prompted the Obama administration to expand an asylum program that protects some of these migrants.

The move is getting mixed reviews in the Washington area, home to thousands of Salvadorans. And as Armando Trull from Here & Now contributor WAMU reports, the changes come too late for one Maryland father.

Samsung is permanently ending production of its signature Galaxy Note 7 after more reports of the smartphone catching fire.

The electronics giant previously called on carriers to stop selling the phone, but now it says it will take more drastic steps while it investigates the problem. The move leaves Samsung without a high-end model to rival Apple’s iPhone 7, and may cause headaches for millions of customers.