Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Carly Groben, the owner of Proof restaurant in downtown Des Moines. She's been nominated for Food & Wine magazine's "Best New Chef" award.

Legislative Week 2

Jan 16, 2011

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Iowa Public Radio Statehouse Reporter Jeneane Beck about what's ahead in the Iowa Legislature this week. 

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Ryan Bickel of Blank Park Zoo and John Sutter of the National Mississippi River Museum about the competition to drum up supporters on the social networking site.

The U.S. Census employed more than 5,000 Iowans just a few months ago, but now that number has dwindled to almost none. Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon reports many workers are now back out in the job market.

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Alan Willits of Cargill about a request before the FDA to allow the corn-based sweetener to be re-labeled as "corn sugar."

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Tom Delahunt of Drake University about the new D+ logo and marketing campaign.

  A 50-year follow-up is in the works for a study involving 400,000 American high school students - including those at about two-dozen Iowa schools - in 1960.

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with Iowa State University Economist Dave Swenson about findings that floods and other severe weather two years ago didn't mean a major economic hit to the state as a whole.

Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon talks with American Atheists, Inc. President Ed Buckner about why the group is holding its annual convention in Des Moines next spring.

In part two of our series on problem gambling, Sarah McCammon visits the site of what will be the Grand Falls Casino Resort in northwest Iowa, and explores the costs and benefits to the community.

Preliminary data show about 5 percent more Iowans seeking help for gambling addiction through state-funded treatment programs. That follows three years of declining numbers.

A record number of Iowa workers have run out of unemployment benefits and still have not found jobs.

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