Dean Borg

Correspondent

Dean Borg is an Iowa City based correspondent for Iowa Public Radio. He joined IPR in 2000, but his broadcast news career began at WOI Radio as an Iowa State University student.  Later in Cedar Rapids, he led a 32-person news, sports, weather and farm radio and television staff for The WMT Stations. His experience includes daily coverage of the Iowa General Assembly, news and documentary reports from South Vietnam and the Paris Peace Talks, moderating nationally televised presidential candidate debates, and interviewing every President since John F. Kennedy.

He holds journalism and political science degrees from Iowa State and The University of Iowa. ISU conferred its Distinguished Achievement Citation to him, the highest award given to alumni.  He is also the winner of lifetime achievement awards from The Iowa Broadcast News Association and the Northwest Broadcast News Association.

Dean's favorite public radio program is Car Talk.

Ways to Connect

Photo by Dean Borg

Farmers in Winnebago, Worth, and Cerro Gordo  counties have been stymied by frequent, heavy rains. Now well past optimum planting dates, thousands of acres will be unproductive this year as farmers hope to be able to seed cover crops to prevent wind and water from eroding the barren top soil.


 

Photo by Dean Borg


 



 

Dean Borg / IPR

The University of Iowa will soon begin demolishing its flood-damaged Hancher Auditorium. UI has shut-down the climate control that has been heating and cooling the building during the past five years.

Iowa is nearing the end of the first year of a three-year experiment with the Iowa Virtual Academy.

Flickr Creative Commons

Iowa is nearing the end of the first year of a three-year experiment with the Iowa Virtual Academy.

Politics Day

Mar 20, 2013
KP Tripathi / flickr

Future presidential candidates in Iowa, Board of Regents, Iowa state legislature, the search for a replacement for Senator Tom Harkin, and the self-reflection of the Republican Party. Guests are Dennis Goldford, Professor of Politics at Drake University and Tim Hagle, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Iowa.

Flickr / QinetiQ group

Often when we hear about unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, it pertains to military strikes and surveillance.  However unmanned aerial vehicle technology is bringing UAVs into our everyday lives right here in Iowa.   Today on "River to River" we explore the domestic uses of UAVs.

Google Plus

There’s a lot of interest in expanding casino gambling in Iowa.        

Linn County’s referendum next Tuesday decides whether to allow a casino in Cedar Rapids.

There’s a similar initiative in Warren County for  Norwalk, at the southwest edge of Des Moines.

Neither have casinos now. But in the Quad-Cities - where there are three casinos along the Mississippi River - the City of Davenport is moving to purchase and operate one of them.

Politics Day

Feb 20, 2013

It's Politics Day on "River to River". We touch on national and state issues, from the looming sequester to Linn County's casino plans. Political analysts, Bruce Nesmith of Coe College and Tim Hagle of the University of Iowa, join our discussion.

The Iowa Department of Education is seeking state funding to expand on-line education for high school students. The Department is now operating what’s called “Iowa Learning Online” with federal funding that’s expiring.

State Education Director Jason Glass says the program is serving students who aren’t doing well in traditional classrooms.

“We have students that are bullied. We have students that are medically fragile. We have students that need to be home for any number of reasons, “ Glass says. “Those are the kind of students we want to make this an option for.”

Tom Woodward / Flickr

     

Like many Midwestern states, Iowa is closing the 2012 calendar year with soil moisture deficits after this summer's drought. But with the new crop year at least four months away, Iowa State University Climatologist Elwynn Taylor is seeing some spotty

Taylor credits abundant fall rains with helping mitigate the drought, at least for now.

The Iowa Board of Regents is declining to renew a contract with University of Iowa President Sally Mason. Regents President Craig Lang confirms that Mason is working without a contract.

“Her contract – five-year contract – was up in August,” he says. “We did not renew a new contract with President Mason. She is employed at will.”

Lang says the Regents are asking Mason to improve the University’s statewide outreach, improve relations with the Iowa Legislature, and establish goals.

Legislative Services Agency website

We hear from the two candidates vying to represent Iowa's new 2nd congressional district, which covers the southeast corner of the state. Incumbent Democrat from Iowa City, Dave Lobesack, will defend his three terms in the U.S. House of Representatives against challenger John Archer, a Republican and corporate attorney from Bettendorf, who tells us why he thinks he would be better for the people of Iowa in the second district.

Dean Borg / Iowa Public Radio

The Republican vice presidential candidate and Wisconsin Congressman emphasized his Catholic faith and brought his wife and three children on stage with him at Loras College in Dubuque.

Dean Borg / Iowa Public Radio

With Halloween approaching, attention is turning to pumpkins. But not all pumpkin fields are filled with orange.

Greg Touzani of the University of Iowa Veterans Association
Bill Adams / Iowa Now

It’s a transition that isn’t all that easy: military veterans often have a tough time leaving the front line and moving back into life on a college campus or a job back home.

Iowa law enables anyone obtaining one-hundred voter signatures to get a satellite voting at a site of their choosing.  Election officials must hold balloting at that location for at least one day before the November 6th general election.

Drought And The Economy

Sep 14, 2012
Theresa Wysocki / Flickr

What is the economic impact of this year’s drought? When it comes to food prices, agricultural experts and analysts say it means a spike due to soaring corn prices, but consumers may not see higher prices in the grocery store until 2013. Then we look at other economic factors in the Midwest, including how the 2012 Presidential Election could affect crude oil prices.

Dave Lawerence / Flickr

Presidential candidate Mitt Romney wraps up his two-day visit to Des Moines as President Barack Obama gets ready for a three-day stop in Iowa next week. IPR's Dean Borg talks with two political science experts about the heavy candidate presence in Iowa and the issues the candidate's are driving home during their stay.

President Obama addressed tax cuts for the middle class at his stop in Cedar Rapids Tuesday. On this Politics Day, IPR’s Dean Borg talks with political scientists Tim Hagle from the University of Iowa and Donna Hoffman from the University of Northern Iowa about the President’s visit as both Obama and Republican presidential candidate, Mitt Romney, make their appeals to the middle class.

Toby Dickens

Our summer series continues into the noon hour on "River to River". We are examining communities along our state’s border and the challenges businesses face in these areas. On today's "River to River", we take a look at the challenges businesses in the Quad Cities and Sioux City face in economic development when competing with Illinois and South Dakota tax structures.

Iowa public universities continue to face difficult decisions such as financial backing and enrollment. IPR’s Dean Borg talks with Iowa State University President Steven Leath and President Ben Allen from the University of Northern Iowa about challenges they face including program closings, financial backing, and future plans for their schools.

On Politics Day, IPR’s Dean Borg talks with two political scientists, Bruce Nesmith from Coe College and Donna Hoffman from the University of Northern Iowa, about the current strategies of President Obama and Republican Mitt Romney including the recent political gaffes and how the incidents may impact the candidates. Later on, Dean talks about the potential influence Ron Paul could have in Iowa’s Republican party in light of the coming GOP state convention.

        In the Quad Cities, Davenport’s St. Ambrose University will soon be opening a new program for training physician assistants.
      The job market is good for the female-dominated profession, but class sizes are limited.

Dean Borg/IPR

In next Tuesday’s primary election, two Republicans are seeking the party’s First District Congressional nomination. Independence attorney Ben Lange and Dubuque businessman Rod Blum are campaigning for a chance at denying incumbent  Democrat Bruce Braley a fourth term representing the newly-configured northeast Iowa district.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's stay in Iowa. It was only a few decades ago that railroad tracks laced the state's countryside, linking even the smallest Iowa communities to the rest of the country. Many of these short line railroads have been disappearing. They're being turned into farm land or in some cases, bicycle trails. But in one Iowa community, farmers and businessmen are using their own money to preserve their railroad connection. They see it as an economic lifeline.

Iowa Public Radio's Dean Borg reports.

IPR/Dean Borg

The familiar movie-opening theme is fading in many of Iowa’s small communities. Many main-street theaters, caught in a technological dilemma, are closing. But as Iowa Public Radio’s Dean Borg, reports some communities are scrambling to preserve main stret silver screens.

They are known as our friendly neighbors to the north- host Dean Borg examines Iowa's relationship with Canada with Mary Lawyer, the new Honorary Consul of Canada in Iowa. She'll discuss her role advising Canadians on policy and trade issues and helping Iowans make business contacts north of the border. Later, Dean talks with Iowa Senator Tom Harkin. The Senator will discuss prospects for a 2012 Farm Bill and his recent meeting with education officials in Washington.

Pages