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Shots - Health News
11:40 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Take A Listen To The Shots Podcast

In Washington's Columbia Heights neighborhood, Claire Robertson, a grad student, talks with Scott Hensley about retail health clinics.
David Schultz NPR

Originally published on Fri November 2, 2012 4:34 pm

  • Listen to the Podcast

We're always looking for new angles on health news. And now we're trying a new angle on Shots: a podcast.

This is an experiment, so I should ask for your informed consent. Are you prepared for some unorthodox audio from an ink-stained wretch still working on the transition to online journalism from print? If so, click away.

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Music
11:36 am
Mon October 29, 2012

The Fresh Air Interview: Peter Rowan Bluegrass Band

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 8:53 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Nov. 24, 2010.

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The Two-Way
11:01 am
Mon October 29, 2012

The Science Of Why Sandy Is Such A Dangerous Storm

A Dare County utility worker checks on conditions along a flooded Ride Lane in Kitty Hawk, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:33 am

Here are a few reasons government forecasters at the National Hurricane Center and emergency management officials are so concerned about Sandy:

1. Sandy is one of the largest hurricanes ever to strike the U.S. Sandy's winds cover an area of more than 1,000 miles in diameter. That's enormous by hurricane standards. So instead of affecting an area a couple of hundred miles across, Sandy will cut a huge swath. That means many millions of people are probably going to be exposed to high winds, heavy rains, and, for those on the coast, powerful storm surge.

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China: Change Or Crisis
10:34 am
Mon October 29, 2012

China's New Leaders Inherit Country At A Crossroads

"The Defense of Yan'an" re-enacts a 1947 battle to protect Mao Zedong's Communist stronghold during the Chinese Civil War from the Nationalists, who fled to Taiwan.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 9:53 am

China is about to get new leaders for the first time in a decade, and it comes at a sensitive moment for the world's most populous nation. Economic growth, which surged for decades, has slowed. Demands for political reform have increased and the Communist Party has been hit by scandal. In a series of stories this week, NPR is examining the multiple challenges facing China. In our first story, Louisa Lim looks at how the Chinese view the Communist Party in the place where it took shape.

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China: Change Or Crisis
10:31 am
Mon October 29, 2012

At 79, Ex-Party Official Lambastes Chinese Leaders

Once a top Communist Party figure, 79-year-old Bao Tong was kicked out after he sympathized with the student protesters in 1989.
Louisa Lim NPR

The frail 79-year-old in a pale brown shirt with close-cropped hair sitting at a fast-food restaurant table looks absolutely unremarkable. But Bao Tong has a lightness in his eyes, a confidence that speaks of a man whose conscience is clear, a man with nothing to fear.

"I have become my own person," he says. "When I was a Communist Party member, I had to follow party discipline. When they threw me out of the party, my brain was set free."

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The Salt
10:05 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Six Tips For Feeding The Family During A Storm-Related Power Outage

People try to get through the aisles at Whole Foods Market in Midtown in New York on Sunday before the storm.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 11:48 am

Before you brave the rain, wind and inevitable lines at the already depleted grocery store today in the Mid-Atlantic region, take a deep breath.

If you're a moderately good grocery shopper, you probably already have the food you need on hand to make it through the next few days if (when) we lose power because of Hurricane Sandy. (If not, best to find a shelter near you.) But you do need to take extra precautions that what you're preparing is safe.

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Election 2012
9:39 am
Mon October 29, 2012

After Election, Winner Will Face Economic Hurdles

Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and President Obama debate on Oct. 22 at Lynn University in Boca Raton, Fla.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 12:29 pm

Later this week we'll get another snapshot of the U.S. job market: the last unemployment report before next week's presidential election.

Forecasters expect another sign of slow but steady job growth. Whoever is in the Oval Office next year will have to cope with a sluggish U.S. economy and confront some urgent policy decisions.

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The Two-Way
8:19 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Consumer Spending Jumped Up In September

Hitting the mall: Spending rose in September.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Though Hurricane Sandy is the dominant news of the day, there are other stories, including:

"Personal income increased $48.1 billion, or 0.4 percent," in September from August, the Bureau of Economic Analysis says, while "personal consumption expenditures" — consumer spending — rose 0.8 percent.

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Krulwich Wonders...
7:59 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Celebrating Autumn All Year Round ... By Becoming A Leaf

Piotr Naskrecki

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 10:04 am

It is autumn, and where I live the leaves are peaking; there is a riot of them everywhere, narrow ones, broad ones, droopy ones, crunchy ones. Leaves come in so many shapes, hues, textures — the closer you look, the more differences you see. Botanists have names for every leaf type, and clumped together, says writer Robert Dunn, they sound like free verse poetry ...

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The Two-Way
6:11 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Other News: Giants Win World Series; Syrian 'Ceasefire' Ending

San Francisco Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval was the World Series' most valuable player. He hit three home runs in Game 1.
Matt Slocum Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 7:21 am

  • Mike Pesca on 'Morning Edition'

While we continue to monitor Hurricane Sandy, we wanted to pass on some of the morning's other top headlines:

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Around the Nation
5:54 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Re-Educating Coyotes To Fear Humans In Mass.

Coyotes have moved into the Boston suburb of Belmont, Mass. The Boston Globe says they've lost their fear of humans because people feed them. So, Belmont is training volunteers for coyote hazing. Their job is to harass coyotes — shouting at them, throwing objects their way, even squirting them with water hoses.

The Two-Way
5:44 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Sandy: Latest News As The Worst Begins To Be Felt

Broken and non-functional traffic lights hang over an intersection in Atlantic City, N.J., on Monday.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Tue October 30, 2012 10:18 am

As Hurricane Sandy drenches much of the Mid-Atlantic and moves northwest, we're updating with the latest news about a storm that forecasters say will be historic in size and intensity and how it is affecting millions of Americans:

Update at 8:43 p.m. ET. Sandy Makes Landfall:

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Around the Nation
4:22 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Key West, Fla., Celebrates The 'A-Conch-Alypse'

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Key West, Florida has seen its share of hurricanes. But as Sandy passed well to the east, residents of the island completed their annual Fantasy Fest. The theme was A-Conch-Alypse, you know, the apocalypse but with conch shells. A parade included floats with alien invaders and a post-apocalyptic zombie ghost town. One float featured a zombie presidential election with advocates for zombie care and a candidate named Eaton D. Brains. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Author Interviews
4:14 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Should 'The Generals' Get Fired More Often?

The Penguin Press

One issue that has received little attention in this year's presidential race is the war in Afghanistan. But according to Thomas E. Ricks, we should be paying attention — specifically to those in charge of the military there, because they can make the difference between long, expensive wars and decisive victories. That's the lesson Ricks explores in his latest book, The Generals.

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Monkey See
4:14 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Impersonating The President: From Will Rogers To Obama's 'Anger Translator'

Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele cooperate to impersonate President Obama in Comedy Central's Key and Peele.
Ian White Comedy Central

Political commentators will be working overtime in the countdown to the presidential election. So will political comedians, including the candidates' impersonators.

Impersonators have been part of the political landscape for so long, it's hard to imagine a time without them: Rich Little, Dana Carvey, Will Ferrell, Dan Aykroyd, Darrell Hammond, Tina Fey and other comedians have all famously done their turns as candidates. Remember "I can see Russia from my house"?

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NPR Story
4:09 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Hurricane Sandy Shuts Down Wall Street

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 5:47 am

Hurricane Sandy's full impact on the U.S. economy won't be known for quite some time, though some estimates for possible damage are in the billions. A more immediate economic effect is on the markets, as Wall Street shuts down for at least Monday.

Shots - Health News
3:17 am
Mon October 29, 2012

Pricey New Prostate Cancer Therapy Raises Questions About Safety, Cost

Radiation therapist Jean Etienne holds a range compensator, which shapes the depth to which the proton beam enters a patient's body to target a tumor.
Rebecca Davis NPR

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 9:42 am

Bill Sneddon had a feeling he was in trouble when his doctor called with his latest test results.

"I just had a premonition that something's not right," said Sneddon, 68, of Ocean Township, N.J.

And, sure enough, Sneddon's instincts were right. He had prostate cancer.

"Well, it's an eye-opener, you know. I didn't know if I had to buy a yard sale sign, you know," he said. "It's a shocking thing ... It always happens to someone else."

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The Two-Way
6:28 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Afghan Army Seeks Better Equipment, But Lacks Basic Skills

Afghan National Army soldiers at Camp Joyce base in Kunar Province in August.
AFP Getty Images

One of the most common complaints from Afghan forces and officials is that they don't have the equipment they need to lead the fight in Afghanistan. They routinely call on NATO to provide more cutting-edge hardware for Afghan troops.

Certainly, when you see a U.S. soldier standing next to an Afghan one, the difference is striking. U.S. soldiers are often saddled with pounds and pounds of electronics and gadgets, ranging from GPS units to night-vision goggles and radio-jamming devices.

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The Two-Way
5:49 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Rocker Gary Glitter Arrested In Connection With U.K. Sex Abuse Investigation

Former British rock star Gary Glitter, whose real name is Paul Gadd, returns home in central London on Sunday after he was arrested earlier in the day by British police as they investigate the mountain of sexual abuse allegations against the late TV star Jimmy Savile.
AFP/Getty Images

There's a new development in the British investigation into the allegations of child sex abuse against a late BBC television host: U.K. media, including the BBC, are reporting that police Sunday arrested rocker and convicted sex offender Gary Glitter on suspicion of sex offenses.

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NPR Story
5:33 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction: 'Speechless,' 'Harding'

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

You know what the ticking means. It's time for Three-Minute Fiction, our contest where we ask you for original stories that can be read in about three minutes. Our judge in this round, the thriller writer Brad Meltzer, the challenge: to write a story that revolves around a U.S. president who could be fictional or real. And, of course, the story had to be 600 words or less. We received nearly 4,000 entries, and here are two that stood out.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Education
4:03 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Undocumented Students Take Education Underground

Pam Voekel is a volunteer teacher at Freedom University in Georgia, an informal school for undocumented youth who are banned from some state schools.
John Paul Gallagher

Originally published on Fri November 9, 2012 3:19 pm

About 35 students meet every Sunday at an undisclosed location in Georgia to study. They are undocumented and banned from attending some of the most prestigious colleges in the state.

Georgia is one of three states to bar undocumented students from attending schools. But a group of professors at the University of Georgia has created a fledgling school to provide a place for students to learn.

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Author Interviews
4:03 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Stories Of The Power of Language, 'Found In Translation'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 9:41 am

Translation is everywhere — that's is the crux of a new book by Nataly Kelly and Jost Zetzsche: Found in Translation: How Language Shapes Our Lives and Transforms our World.

From NASA to the U.N. to Chinese tattoo parlors, the book looks high and low for stories of the undeniable importance of language. One of those stories centers on a man named Peter Less, 91, an inspiration of sorts to interpreters and translators everywhere.

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Around the Nation
3:48 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

A Save Haven For The Printed Word Turns 200

Antiquarian Hall, the home of the American Antiquarian Society, is located in Worcester, Mass.
The American Antiquarian Society

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 1:37 pm

Back in the 1700s, there was a young printer's apprentice who lived in Boston. His name was Isaiah Thomas and he became one of the first newspaper publishers in the country. He also founded the American Antiquarian Society, which celebrates its 200th birthday this week.

Located in Worcester, Mass., the American Antiquarian Society houses the largest collection of materials printed in the United States. Its library has books, newspapers, letters, even board games dating from 1640 to 1876. Its members include some notable characters, including 14 presidents.

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Law
3:08 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Surveillance Act Criticized, But Can It Be Fought?

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 4:14 am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday considers whether to allow a challenge to a federal law that provides for large-scale electronic surveillance of international phone calls and emails. The case is not a direct test of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Rather, it is a test of whether the law can even be challenged in court at all.

How FISA Came To Be

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Science
2:26 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Millennia Of Stargazing At 'African Cosmos' Exhibit

Untitled, by South African artist Gavin Jantjes, is one of the works in the "African Cosmos" exhibition.
National Museum of African Art

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 5:33 pm

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Commentary
2:18 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Around The River Bend, A Flood Of History

The Ho-Chunk Indians still consider the river to be sacred, and it's easy to feel that calm, floating along the Bark.
Liam O'Leary

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 6:41 pm

The Bark River is my backyard, childhood river. And yet, in a lifetime of travel, I'd never explored it.

I knew it carved the land from the Ice Age to settlement times, from the Black Hawk War of 1832 (in which young Abraham Lincoln appears) to the era of grist mills. But the Bark also flows past impressive Indian mounds. It nurtured poets, naturalists and farmers.

When former Marquette University professor Milton Bates published his Bark River Chronicles through the Wisconsin State Historical Society, I jumped at the chance to learn about the river with him.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
12:46 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Hurricane CSI: Frankenstorm Sandy And Climate Change

Hurricane Sandy's huge cloud extends up to 2,000 miles based on a satellite image from Sunday.
NASA GOES Project

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 2:10 pm

It was not a good year for people, weather and climate. The winter was strangely warm in many places and the summer ridiculously hot. As a large fraction of the country suffered through extreme or even extraordinary drought many folks naturally wondered, "Is this climate change?" Then along came a presidential election in which the words "climate change" disappeared from the dialogue. Now, just a week or so before voting day, the convergence of westbound Hurricane Sandy with a eastbound cold front is creating a massive storm, a Frankenstorm even, that is threatening millions of Americans.

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Shots - Health News
12:32 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

Museum Teaches Anatomy And Disease With Ghoulish Body Part Bake-Off

STD cupcakes: From Two Little Cats Bakery in Cambridge & Hertfordshire, these chocolate cupcakes feature symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases, including gonorrhea, syphilis, genital warts, chlamydia and HIV.
Eat Your Heart Out 2012

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 10:16 am

Everyone's crazy for cupcakes these days, as our pals over at The Salt will tell you. So why not use them to lure the public into a conversation about STDs and platelets?

That's what St. Bartholomews Pathology Museum in the U.K. is up to this weekend, and the baked goods on the menu are quite the frightening sight.

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The Two-Way
12:10 pm
Sun October 28, 2012

East Coast Braces For Impact From Sandy

High winds blow sea foam onto Jennette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area.
Gerry Broome AP

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:48 pm

"The time for preparing and talking is about over." That's the message from Craig Fugate, the head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency as Hurricane Sandy, the monstrous superstorm that's churning its way to the U.S. East Coast, threatening millions of people.

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History
8:03 am
Sun October 28, 2012

Closing Courthouse Brought Moonshiners To Justice

The John B. Hayes Federal Building in Wilkesboro, N.C., is among several federal courthouses being closed in the South.
Michael Tomsic WFAE

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 9:58 am

Moonshine used to be big business in the South, an illegal business that also kept the federal courthouses busy. Now one of those facilities, once on the front lines of the war on homemade booze, is shutting down.

The Johnson J. Hayes Federal Building is in Wilkesboro, N.C., where distilling corn whiskey in backwoods breweries was once the town's main trade. It's one of six federal courthouses closing in the South over the next year or two.

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