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Parallels
4:35 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

On Opposite Sides Of Israeli-Gaza Border, Feeling The Same Fears

Several families share this one-room underground shelter in Ashkelon, Israel, not far from the border with Gaza. The children say they're afraid to go outside.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

More than 50 Palestinians have been killed and 450 wounded in Israeli airstrikes on the Gaza Strip. Meanwhile, rockets continue to fly toward Israel from Gaza, but so far, no Israelis have been reported killed.

For people living in and around the Gaza Strip, this conflict has turned daily routines upside down. Life is punctuated by sirens and explosions.

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The Salt
4:35 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Is Foster Farms A Food Safety Pioneer Or A Persistent Offender?

Foster Farms set up new procedures to deal with salmonella contamination after the USDA threatened to shut down its plants last fall.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:19 pm

Foster Farms, a chicken producer in California, just can't seem to stop bleeding bad news.

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Music News
4:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Clash In Nashville: A Property Battle On Music Row Draws A Crowd

Inside RCA Studio A, whose sale has sparked a wave of backlash from the Nashville music community, Ben Folds (right, on staircase) addresses press and supporters.
Stephen Jerkins

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 10:27 am

News that a Nashville developer is paying $4.4 million for a half-century-old recording studio has sparked a battle in Music City. On one side is singer-songwriter Ben Folds, inspired by the musical history made in that studio. On the other, a trailblazing musician who made that history.

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Politics
4:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Obama Stumps In Colorado, With Women's Vote As Backdrop

President Obama greets a woman at Wazee Supper Club in Denver on Tuesday. He was in Colorado this week speaking about the economy and raising money for congressional candidates.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

In Colorado, where President Obama's approval rating is low and the Senate race is tight, Democratic incumbent Mark Udall largely bowed out of the spotlight of the president's visit Wednesday.

But as Obama made the rounds speaking about the economy and raising money for Democratic congressional candidates, he also spoke about the women's issues that could be key to Udall's electoral success.

At a morning outdoor rally in Denver's Cheesman Park, Obama emphasized just how much is on the line in the midterms.

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The Two-Way
4:19 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Man Tied To Nazis Dies In Michigan At Age 93

John Kalymon talks to The Associated Press in 2009 outside his home in Troy, Mich. Kalymon died June 29.
Paul Sancya AP

John Kalymon of Troy, Mich., died June 29. He was 93. The Associated Press reports that he had pneumonia, prostate cancer and dementia. But during World War II, Kalymon served in a Nazi-allied police force, and for that he'd been ordered deported by a U.S. court.

Kalymon had always denied the claims against him.

"The last two years he had no idea about anything about his life," his son Alex Kalymon told the AP. "He was just struggling to live and his mind wasn't there."

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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Argentina Ditches Dutch On The Way To World Cup Final

Players go for the ball during the World Cup semifinal soccer match between the Netherlands and Argentina at the Itaquerao Stadium in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Wednesday.
Fabrizio Bensch AP

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 1:46 pm

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Argentina defeated the Netherlands 4-2 in penalty kicks to reach the final of the World Cup, where they will play Germany on Sunday.

The two teams were tied 0-0 at the end of extra time.

Goalkeeper Sergio Romero saved penalties by Ron Vlaar and Wesley Sneijder. Maxi Rodriguez put away the winning kick.

The last time a World Cup semifinal was decided by penalty kicks was 1998 when Netherlands played Brazil. Brazil won that encounter.

The Associated Press reports:

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Iraq
3:44 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Amid Bloodshed, Brotherhood: Links Forged From Iraq's Game Of Rings

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

In Iraq, a Ramadan game called Mheibbis brings even Sunnis and Shiites together in peaceful competition. A ring game traditionally played between neighborhoods during the holy month, Mheibbis has offered men the opportunity to break Baghdad's tension and offer messages of unity and brotherhood — even between rival sects.

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Shots - Health News
3:23 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Do The World Cup's Fluttering Kicks Put Fans' Hearts At Risk?

Brazil fans in Rio de Janeiro watch in horror as Germany routs the home team in the World Cup semifinal match played Tuesday.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 2:35 pm

Brazil's cataclysmic World Cup loss to Germany broke the heart of a nation.

But for some fans, the emotional anguish may have felt all too real – resulting in heart attacks that not even the U.S.'s star goalie Tim Howard could stop.

A 2008 analysis published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that cardiac events skyrocketed during World Cup matches.

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Law
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Brooklyn DA Shifts Weight Away From Low-Level Marijuana Cases

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The district attorney of Brooklyn, New York has announced that his office will not prosecute most low-level marijuana cases. Kenneth Thompson explained his decision by saying, we are pouring money and effort into an endeavor that produces no public safety benefit for the community. And DA Thompson joins me now to talk about the new policy. Welcome to the program.

KENNETH THOMPSON: Thank you for having me.

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Europe
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

In Germany, A Case Against Another Alleged American Spy

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Politics
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Lawmakers Unearth Failures To Investigate Campus Sex Crimes

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

U.S. colleges are failing to investigate sex crimes on their campuses. That's the conclusion of a new national survey commissioned by U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill. The survey is part of an effort by several senators to reduce sexual assaults in college and change a culture where only 5 percent of victims report the crime. NPR's Laura Sullivan reports from the capital.

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Iraq
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

The Plight Of Mosul's Museum: Iraqi Antiquities At Risk Of Ruin

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Law
3:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Corruption Convictions Spell 10 Year Sentence For Former NOLA Mayor

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:39 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

A federal judge has sentenced former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin to 10 years in prison for corruption conviction. The sentence was lighter than what prosecutors were seeking for the former two-term Democrat. NPR's Debbie Elliott covered Nagin's trial earlier this year, and she joins us now to talk about today's sentencing. Debbie, first remind us of what Ray Nagin was convicted of back in February.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Citigroup And Justice Department Reportedly Near Deal

In this Jan. 6, 2012 photo, a Citibank customer makes a transaction at an ATM, in New York. (Mark Lennihan/AP)

Citigroup and the Justice Department are reportedly closing in on a $7 billion deal that would settle allegations that the bank sold shoddy mortgages in the run up to the 2008 financial crisis.

The deal is expected to be announced in the next week and comes after months of tense negotiations between the bank and government officials — negotiations that became so tense that in June, the Justice Department threatened to sue if the bank did not agree to the government’s proposed penalty.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Medal Of Honor Recipient Reflects On Honor And Loss

Sgt. Ryan Pitts, pictured here at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan, will become the ninth living recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor for bravery in Afghanistan or Iraq. (U.S. Army)

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:02 pm

The Battle of Wanat is one of the bloodiest battles of the war in Afghanistan. Nine American soldiers were killed and more than two dozen were wounded when hundreds of insurgents assaulted the Army outpost they were building in Waygal Valley on July 13, 2008. It was just after 4 o’clock that morning when the American soldiers were blasted with machine guns, rocket propelled grenades and hand grenades.

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

YA Novel 'Say What You Will' Draws Inspiration From Teens With Disabilities

Cammie McGovern is author of "Say What You Will." (Ellen Augarten)

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:41 pm

When author Cammie McGovern’s oldest son was diagnosed with autism, she looked for an outlet where he could be with other children with similar difficulties. That led her to form the group “Whole Children,” an after-school and weekend program for children with disabilities.

Now, a decade later, those kids spurred her to write the new young adult novel “Say What You Will” (excerpt below).

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Television
1:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

'The Strain' And 'Extant' Play On Fears Of Forces Out Of Our Control

The threat is both viral and vampire in The Strain, a show about the sudden outbreak of a disease that kills most of its victims — then begins to mutate them into another species entirely.
Michael Gibson FX

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:02 pm

They say every generation gets the science fiction it deserves, built around its biggest and most primal fears. Well, maybe they don't say that — but they should. In the '50s, all those movies about mutant giant monsters going berserk were a way for us to channel our fears about the atomic bomb. In the same way, in that same decade, all those body-snatcher movies were about being unable to tell friend from foe, or trust even your closest loved ones — the perfect paranoid parable for the Communist witch-hunting era.

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The Salt
1:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:32 pm

Every year, more than half of the honeybee hives in the United States are taken to California to pollinate the state's almond crop.

Biologist Laurence Packer says this illustrates both our dependence on honeybees to pollinate many plants people rely on for food and the devastating decline in the domestic honeybee population in recent years.

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Music
1:46 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

If Jim Lauderdale Is A Song, More People Should Hear It

Jim Lauderdale's new album is called I'm A Song, a title that suggests his deep
immersion in songwriting. His compositions have been covered by singers ranging from George Strait to Solomon Burke, from the Dixie Chicks to Elvis Costello. Since his debut album in 1991, he's recorded more than 25 albums for a variety of record companies, and I'm A Song contains a generous 20 songs. Rock critic Ken Tucker says Lauderdale's career is at once admirable and somewhat puzzling.

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The Two-Way
1:17 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

What Happens When Israeli Mourners Visit A Palestinian Family

On Monday, Hussein Abu Khdeir, father of 16-year-old Palestinian Mohammed Abu Khdeir, held a photo of his son as he met with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the West Bank. On Tuesday, the Abu Khdeir family received Israeli guests who wanted to apologize for their loss.
Mohamad Torokman AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:30 pm

The family of slain Palestinian teenager Mohammed Abu Khdeir received condolences from an unlikely source Tuesday: Israelis who had asked to come and mourn with them.

The scene was predictably awkward, even painfully so. But as NPR's Ari Shapiro reported for today's Morning Edition, the visit also brought a moment of grace for many of those involved.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Senate Confirms Julian Castro As Housing Secretary

Julian Castro was confirmed Wednesday to be the next secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
Kevin Dietsch UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:06 pm

The Senate voted 71-26 on Wednesday to confirm San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

All 26 no votes came from Republicans.

"Julian has lived the American dream in his own life, and I'm confident he will help Americans across our country seize their own piece of that dream for themselves and their children," President Obama said in a statement after the vote.

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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Wed July 9, 2014

Rivals Claim Victory In Indonesian Presidential Election

Indonesian presidential candidate Joko Widodo claimed victory on Wednesday.
Bagus Indahono EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:52 pm

Jakarta Gov. Joko Widodo, who entered national politics just two years ago, has claimed victory citing early results in the presidential election in Indonesia, the world's most-populous Muslim nation. But his main rival, former Gen. Prabowo Subianto, is refusing to concede.

"This is the victory of the whole Indonesian population!" Widodo said.

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Sports
11:29 am
Wed July 9, 2014

NFL Players Association Still Not Satisfied By Concussion Settlement

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Germany Widens Spy Investigation Reportedly Involving U.S.

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 2:00 pm

Germany is reportedly investigating a second spy case involving the U.S., just days after the arrest of a man who news reports say passed intelligence to the United States.

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Shots - Health News
11:08 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What Gets You Stressed? Tell Our Expert Panel

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 9:42 am

Editor's note: The webcast is over, but you can watch the archived video of the event.

For many Americans, stress is a constant and frequently overwhelming fact of daily life.

What are the biggest sources of stress? How does stress affect us? And what do we do in response?

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The Two-Way
11:04 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Flop Life: What If We All Acted Like We Were In The World Cup?

In a new video, people casually bump into one another in cafes and groceries, sparking histrionics like those seen in the World Cup.
YouTube

Originally published on Thu July 10, 2014 7:13 am

The flailing about, the protests, the sheer agony — what if everyone behaved like international soccer stars who can evidently be slammed to the ground by a fingertip?

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The Two-Way
10:43 am
Wed July 9, 2014

As Deadline Nears, Snowden Seeks To Extend His Stay In Russia

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 3:29 pm

Edward Snowden remains a fugitive from U.S. authorities over leaking secret documents about its surveillance programs. Now he's asking Russia to extend the one-year term of asylum the country granted the former NSA contract worker last summer.

Snowden's asylum, which was granted last August, is set to expire at the end of this month. His lawyer, Anatoly Kucherena, says they've filed papers for an extension.

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The Two-Way
10:37 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Ex-New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin Gets 10 Years In Corruption Case

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin leaves federal court after his conviction in New Orleans on Feb. 12. He was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 1:23 pm

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Former New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for bribery, money laundering and other crimes.

He was convicted Feb. 12 of accepting hundreds of thousands of dollars in bribes and kickbacks. The indictment included 21 counts.

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It's All Politics
10:35 am
Wed July 9, 2014

Why You Should Care Where The GOP Meets

Cleveland won the unanimous backing of a Republican National Committee panel on Tuesday, all but guaranteeing the GOP's 2016 presidential pick will accept the party's nomination in perennially hard-fought Ohio.
Tony Dejak AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 11:58 am

The next Republican nominated for president will take the stage and wave to the crowd in ... wait for it ... Cleveland, Ohio.

That may shock you for any number of reasons, not least being that hardly anyone remembers the last time Cleveland hosted a national convention.

In fact, it was 1936, when the GOP went there to nominate a guy named Alf Landon, who carried exactly two states in November. It was the worst showing by a Republican nominee in U.S. history, which may have something to do with Cleveland's long wait for another try.

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Politics
9:54 am
Wed July 9, 2014

What's Causing The Latest Immigration Crisis? A Brief Explainer

Demonstrators from opposing sides confront each other while being separated by police officers on July 4, outside a U.S. Border Patrol station in Murrieta, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 6:28 pm

It's turning into the largest influx of asylum seekers on U.S. soil since the 1980 Mariel boatlift out of Cuba.

Since October, more than 52,000 children — most from Central America and many of them unaccompanied by adults — have been taken into custody. That's nearly double last year's total and 10 times the number from 2009.

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