Courtesy of CROT

The final broadcast of the 2015 Opera in October series features the Cedar Rapids Opera Theatre’s production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni. It airs on Saturday, October 31 at 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, November 1 at 4:00 p.m.

Clay Masters/IPR

The three remaining Democratic presidential candidates rallied thousands of supporters in Des Moines last night, at the state party’s annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner.  During the Saturday’s speeches, Senator Sanders drew contrasts to Clinton by talking about his early opposition to the war in Iraq, the keystone XL pipeline and the Defense of Marriage Act. Janice Payne is a retired lab tech from Des Moines. She attended a rally for Senator Sanders before the dinner. “He’s more for the middle-class and he’s not about being bought by the upper echelon.

Grinnell College

 In 2008, Grinnell's Jennifer Williams Brown won a major award from the American Musicological Society for her edition of Francesco Cavalli's 1651 opera La Calisto. Want to hear what it sounds like when performed using her discoveries? You're in luck! IPR will broadcast a recent performance from Simpson College Opera tonight at 7 PM and again Sunday October 25th at 4PM.  Brown, who chairs Grinnell's music department and directs its Collegium Musicum, served as scholar-in-residence, dramaturg, musicologist, and coach for this production.

Sioux City Schools

Latino activists in Sioux City are gathering signatures to protest Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s appearance at West High School next Tuesday evening. They plan to present a petition to the Superintendent of Schools in Sioux City saying Trump should not be allowed to use school property.

David Scrivner / Iowa City Press-Citizen

A new Johnson County ordinance will raise the local minimum wage from $7.25 in $.95 increments, and this incremental rise will reach $10.10 by 2017. The first phase starts in a couple weeks, unless cities vote otherwise. The town of Swisher is set to do just that, as it is expected to vote down Johnson County’s minimum wage ordinance.

Eighth Circuit Bar Assocation

The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments next month in Des Moines at Drake University.

Federal appeals courts are one level below the U.S. Supreme Court. The Eighth Circuit handles cases from Iowa and six other states. Usually the court only hears cases in St. Louis and St. Paul.

Photo by Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

According to the United Nations, by 2050 the world will need to produce an additional 220 million tons of meat per year to satisfy global demand.

On this River to River segment, host Ben Kieffer talks with Harvest Public Media editor Jeremy Bernfeld and reporters Abby Wendel and Luke Runyon about their latest series on meat, Choice Cuts: Meat In America.

Great news: Curt Snook's The Choral Tradition and Michael Barone's Pipedreams will return to our airwaves on Sunday, November 1st! Curt retired on June 30th (after three decades) and has been enjoying some time off - but we're delighted that he'll again be sharing his extraordinary knowledge and love of choral music with our state.

John Pemble/IPR file

Former Rhode Island governor and U.S. Senator Lincoln Chafee has dropped out of the race for the Democratic nomination for president.  Politico and other news organizations report he is making the official announcement in a Washington speech this morning. 

Photo by Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

All week, Harvest Public Media's series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

Beef, poultry and pork are staples of the American diet, baked into the country's very culture, and backbones of the agricultural economy. But lately, the meats have been saddled with some baggage.

Wikimedia Commons

Colonel Lawrence Wilkerson, who served as chief of staff to US Secretary of State Colin Powell, is speaking out against Pentagon contractors who, he says, have too much say in U.S. foreign policy.

"Corporate influence in general--big oil, big pharma, big food--all exercise insidious power over presidential decision making, over what this country does, both domestically and internationally," he says. 

Christopher Hawkins/flickr

A federal prosecutor for Iowa’s Northern Judicial District briefed an advisory group in Des Moines today on the growing problem of heroin addiction, especially in eastern Iowa.  

Assistant U.S. Attorney Dan Chatham addressed the Iowa Drug Policy Advisory Council.    

Chatham prosecutes drug crimes, including dozens of heroin cases which have grown as users move from prescription meds to heroin.     

He says says heroin on the streets is getting more and more potent.

Sarah Boden/IPR

A federal jury delivered a mixed verdict Thursday in the trial of two senior aides from Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign.

Campaign chairman Jesse Benton was acquitted of lying to the FBI in relation to his knowledge of secret payments made to former Iowa state senator Kent Sorenson for his support of Ron Paul. Deputy campaign manager Dimitrios Kesari was found guilty on one of five counts, causing financial records to be falsely reported to the Federal Election Commission. 

Courtest of 261 Fearless

Runner and author Kathrine Switzer first made headlines in 1967 when the Boston Marathon race commissioner yanked her from the course by her sweatshirt. Today, she’s written three books and tours the world spreading her message that anybody can run a marathon. She was keynote speaker at the IMT Marathon in Des Moines’ pasta dinner which took place Sunday, October 18.

She says it was great to see so many women running the marathon in Des Moines given the fact that women have really only recently been able to enter those races.

Michael Vadon / Flickr

Bernie Sanders has surprised much of the political establishment with his rapid rise. One thing that shouldn’t surprise anyone is his core platform, says John Dillon, news director at Vermont Public Radio. Dillon has covered Sanders for more than 25 years and says the candidate has focused on economic inequality from his earliest campaigns.

“Even when he was running as a third party candidate for U.S. senator and governor in the state of Vermont back in the 70s, he talked about these issues that he’s talking about today.”

Dylan Sires and Neighbors

It's that time again! We're heading back to the Des Moines Social Club on Thursday, November 5th. After doing a couple of upstairs shows, we're going back underground to our natural habitat, the Basement. IPR's Mark Simmet will be spinning your daily soundtrack right by the stage, and we'll be joined by the Cedar Valley's Dylan Sires and Neighbors, one of the hottest bands in Iowa right now. They've had a busy year, touring Japan and performing at the Gentlemen Of The Road stopover in Waverly, all while continuing to play across the state and recording their third album.

Bird Feeder Study

Oct 22, 2015
James Adelman

Birds that spend a lot of time at feeders are more likely to contract disease. A new Iowa State University study of House Finches in Virginia found birds that visited feeders often were more likely to spread an eye infection similar to pink eye in humans.  The study's lead author James Adelman says they tracked individuals in the wild and found that those that spent the most time at feeders were the most likely to get sick.

Terry Gilliam spent the first 12 years of his life in Minnesota, but he would go on to become the one of the most beloved entertainers in British history.

He is one of the founding members of Monty Python and the man responsible for the art and animation that defined the look of the group.  He has a new memoir out, called Gilliamesque: A Pre-posthumous Memoir.

When asked how he feels about imitators, or people who have been inspired by his work, Gilliam says he feels proud.

Principia School / Flickr

There's more than a century between the candidacies of William Jennings Bryan and Bernie Sanders, but history is still repeating itself when it comes to the elections of 1900 and 2016.

"The Industrial Revolution was creating that same gap that the technological revolution has expanded. There was a sense of dizzying inventions that were being made, that the pace of life was speeding up. People were moving from the farm to the city, so it was a disorienting age much like our own. So that was really the spur for the populist movement."

Photo by Kristofor Husted/Harvest Public Media

All week, Harvest Public Media’s series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

Flickr / Joe Gratz

A federal jury in Des Moines completed its first full day of deliberations Wednesday in the trial of two senior aids from Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign. It appears jurors are having a hard time coming to consensus in deciding if deputy campaign director Dimitrios Kesari and campaign chairman Jesse Benton are guilty of charges related to keeping payments to Kent Sorenson, a former Iowa state senator, secret from the Federal Election Commission. 


Congress inched closer to setting a national standard for labeling genetically-modified foods Wednesday, even as farm-state Democrats and Republicans championed the safety of GMOs and voiced frustration that most consumers don't agree.

Iowa DNR

Beautiful fall weather has extended park visits and camping opportunities around the state for many outdoor enthusiasts. However, increasingly dry conditions have prompted the State Fire Marshall to issue burn bans in nearly a quarter of the state.   The bans include many of the state parks.

IPR/Phil Maass

Based out of Seattle, Washington, The Blackberry Bushes Stringband mix equal parts tradition and innovation, with the twang and instrumental chops of bluegrass and 21st-century sensibility to their original songs. Fiddler Jakob Breitbach (a Dubuque native) and singer-songwriter and guitarist Jes Raymond form the core of the band, with Daniel Ullom on mandolin, Forrest Marowitz on bass, and newest member Alex Genova on banjo. They paid a visit to IPR’s Cedar Falls studios during The Folk Tree on Sunday, Oct.

Gregory Chittim / Flickr

Not long ago air conditioners were running full blast, but alas, winter is coming. On this edition of Talk of Iowa, home improvement expert Bill McAnally joins host Charity Nebbe to talk heating and cooling alternatives such as the mini split heat pump, and he gives some advice about putting on storm windows to keep the cold outside. 

On this episode of IPR Studio One's "Java Blend," host Ben Kieffer catches up with Iowa blues-rockers Wooden Nickel Lottery. 

Lend an ear to hear the group's blistering guitar work, powerful vocals and solid bottom from their debut record, "On My Way." 

Photo by Amy Mayer

All week, Harvest Public Media’s series Choice Cuts: Meat In America is examining how the meat industry is changing the U.S. food system and the American diet.

One of the most important tools of modern medicine is in jeopardy. In the 20th century, antibiotics turned once-lethal infections into manageable diseases. They also contributed to the transformation of meat production in America.

© Peter Serling

 The LA Philharmonic concert broadcasts return to IPR Wednesdays at 7PM -  and the first concert features a Pulitzer-winning composer trained in Iowa! David Lang won that Pulitzer (and a Grammy) for his incredibly moving little matchgirl passion, and has also been Musical America's Musician of the Year. along with other honors. But before all that, he came to Iowa to study composition at the University of Iowa. He  says "I was happy I did. It was really a kind of golden age. I really loved it." 

Jury deliberations are underway in the federal trial of two senior staffers from Ron Paul’s 2012 presidential campaign. During closing arguments defense attorneys repeated to the jury several times that Kent Sorenson, a key prosecution witness, lies.

"If Kent Sorenson told you that the sky was blue," said Jesse Binnall, attorney for defendant Dimitrios Kesari, "you'd have to go out and check."

Ted Murphy/flickr

A state lawmaker from Cedar Rapids today grilled the director of the Iowa Racing and Gaming Commission over a proposed license for a smoke-free casino in their city.  

The commission denied Cedar Rapids a gaming license in 2014, citing a saturated market for casinos.  

The city is arguing that a smoke-free casino would fill an unmet need, since smoking is allowed in other gambling houses, an exemption to Iowa’s law banning smoking in public places.