Wildlife and Wildlife Preservation

Gene5335 / Flickr

Deer hunting in Iowa is a $214 million industry. The big question leading into this weekend’s shotgun season is, how will the discovery of chronic wasting disease in captive Iowa deer impact the industry? Host Ben Kieffer, talks with wildlife biologist Jim Pease and Iowa state Senator and hunting enthusiast Dick Dearden about what they think should be done to protect Iowa's wild deer population.

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

We’re all too familiar with whitetail deer. But there also have been a few recent sightings in Iowa of rare white-tailed squirrels.

The rodent with the bushy, snow-white tail is snow white. It’s been seen in the Witmer Park area near Drake University. Earlier this year, several were spotted in the town of Osage.

Wildlife Day: Owls

Oct 16, 2012
Barred owl
Denis-Carl Robidoux / Flickr

If you go out for a walk on a crisp fall night you might hear an owl hooting in the darkness. The barred owl, great horned and screech owls are the three most common kinds of owls found in Iowa.

Charity Nebbe talks and hoots with wildlife biologist Jim Pease about the owls of Iowa from the common breeds to the more uncommon owl sightings.

NASA

What does weather in space have to do with us on Earth? A lot it turns out.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with University of Iowa Astronomy Professor Craig Kletzing. He talks about the instrument created by University of Iowa researchers that is aboard NASA’s latest mission to study the extremes of space weather and help scientists improve space weather forecasts.

Then, David Perlmutter, Director of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Iowa, talks about his trip this summer with other delegates to experience the culture of media in Turkey.

Des Moines Police Department

When the Iowa State Fair opens, one week from today, not all the animals will be on display or in competition; some will be working. It's one of the last mounted patrols in Iowa.

Wild Horses Come to Iowa

Apr 23, 2012

You have to weave between Amish buggies on the gravel road that leads to the Davis County Fairgrounds.

There, this weekend, corrals are holding more than 30 burros and wild horses.

Most of the animals quietly munch on hay. They pay little attention to the families and kids coming up to stalls.

Dave Berg is a specialist for the Bureau of Land Management, or BLM.

“If they have good food and clean water, they’re happy campers," he says. "And out in the wild, they do not have good food and clean water that readily available.”

Department of Natural Resources

Something remarkable is happening in the countryside of Iowa this spring; something that hasn’t been seen to this extent, in more than 120 years. Wildlife experts are cheering the rebound of North America’s largest water fowl.

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