Religion

Religion In Iowa

Oct 26, 2012
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This week’s Being in Iowa series has taken us to Hindu and Sikh Temples, examined the faiths of Mormons and Quakers, and talked with those who choose not to believe. Ben Kieffer and wraps up the series with a conversation about faith in some of Iowa’s smaller religious communities. Iowans tell their stories of coming to faith and moving away from it, and how those journeys have impacted lives.

Being in Iowa: Quakers

Oct 26, 2012

In the final segment of this week's "Being in Iowa," we meet some Christians who go by a couple of names. We know them as Friends or as Quakers. There are also two branches of this religion in Iowa, representing two distinct approaches to worship.

Being in Iowa: Hindus

Oct 25, 2012

The Hindu Temple south of Madrid is an eye-catching structure with plaster images of animals and deities carved all over the outside surfaces. It’s where 500 families pray to the God they call Brahman, which they say is found in everything.

Being in Iowa: Atheists

Oct 24, 2012

It’s impossible to put an exact number on how many people in the state describe themselves as atheist or agnostic. Many of them prefer to stay quiet about it. Iowa Public Radio correspondent Rob Dillard asked several Iowans who do not believe in a supernatural power about where they stand in a society that generally thinks religion is a good thing.

Being in Iowa: Sikhs

Oct 23, 2012

Iowa Public Radio is looking at how different groups of Iowans connect with God. Today, we examine the beliefs held within a 500-year old religion established in the Punjab region of northwest India and northeast Pakistan. In Punjabi it’s pronounced Sikhism (SICK-ism). Over the years, it’s been Anglicized to Sikhism (SEEK-ism). The practitioners at a Temple in West Des Moines pronounced it both ways.

Being in Iowa: Mormons

Oct 22, 2012

With a devout Mormon running for president, pundits have labeled this period “the Mormon moment.” But polls indicate half the American public admits to knowing very little or nothing about the religion. Rob met with some practicing Mormons in Iowa City to understand more about their faith.

Clay Masters / IPR

A new Amish settlement has sprung up in Delaware County, Iowa near Delhi. Members of the Amish community near Edgewood left the settlement because of economic differences they had with the Bishop  about how much time they could work off the farm. In the capital intensive agriculture industry it’s hard for anyone to work the land without a second income. As the Amish are forced to become more progressive it’s pitting them against the eroding Midsize American farms.

Dean Borg / Iowa Public Radio

The Republican vice presidential candidate and Wisconsin Congressman emphasized his Catholic faith and brought his wife and three children on stage with him at Loras College in Dubuque.

After 9/11, suspicion and animosity toward American Muslims spiked. Host Ben Kieffer talks with Eboo Patel, founder and president of the Chicago-based Interfaith Youth Core. Patel says this prejudice is not just a problem for Muslims, but a challenge to the very idea of America. Patel also discusses his new book, Sacred Ground: Pluralism, Prejudice, and the Promise of America.

After 9/11, suspicion and animosity toward American Muslims spiked.

I’m BK. Next time on RTR, my guest is Eboo Patel, founder and president of the Chicago-based Interfaith Youth Core.

Politics and Religion

Aug 22, 2012

The U.S. Constitution says "Congress shall make no law, respecting an establishment of Religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," and the true meaning of those words can evoke discord still today.

Host Ben Kieffer talks with Dennis Goldford, author and professor of politics at Drake University, about religion, which he tackles in his new book "The Constitution of Religious Freedom: God, Politics and the First Amendment."

Then, we look at religion's role in the 2012 election.

"Oh My Gods"

Aug 14, 2012

The Greek and Roman myths are stories that have remained steadfast through the ages and continue inspiring artists, playwrights, writers, and filmmakers to this day. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Qualley Professor of Classics at Luther College and author, Philip Freeman, about his book “Oh My Gods”.  The book retells the tales of Zeus, Hades, and the other Olympian gods for the readers of this generation.

Grotto of the Redemption Turns 100

Jun 25, 2012
Sandhya Dirks / Iowa Public Radio

The Midwest is known for its roadside attractions — world's largest ear of corn, heaviest ball of twine, biggest truck stop.

But it's also home to one of the largest collections of grottoes in the world. Most of these man-made caves were created by immigrant priests at the beginning of the 20th century. And the mother of them all — encrusted in $6 million worth of semiprecious stones — is in West Bend, Iowa.

This weekend, the Grotto of the Redemption turned 100.

Nuns on the Bus in Iowa

Jun 19, 2012

If you were driving across Iowa Monday you might have seen something unique—a big bus emblazoned with the slogan: Nuns on the Bus. It’s a nine state bus tour by Catholic Sisters who are pushing back against the republican budget —at the same time they are feeling heat from the Vatican. Iowa public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks joined the sisters on the road. 

 

We all know that eating fruits and vegetables is good for you, but is "God" good for you too? A study published last year found an 18% lower mortality level for patients who had higher rates of spirituality or religiosity. This hour, we explore the link between spirituality and physical well-being.  Charity speaks with Dr. Richard Deming of the Mercy Cancer Center in Des Moines, who has taken cancer survivors and caregivers on journeys to such places as the Mt. Everest Base Camp and Mt. Kilimanjaro.  He's planning to take his next group to Mt.

Exploring Our Faith

Apr 16, 2012

In what ways does your religion shape the way you live your daily life? We'll examine how faith and spirituality support our basic psychological needs and look at the influence of culture on our religious beliefs. Charity's guests are Nikki Bado, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Iowa State University and Krista Tippett, host of public radio's On Being.  Tippett visits Des Moines April 17th as part of Iowa Public Radio's Insights Series.   

Oh My Gods

Jan 1, 2012

The Greek and Roman myths have never died out; in fact they are as relevant today as ever. In his new book Oh My Gods, Phillip Freeman retells some of the most popular myths that have inspired plays, operas, paintings, movies and television programs. From the astonishing tales of the Argonauts to the immortal narrative of the Battle of Troy, these ancient myths have inspired many across the globe. Freeman is Qualley Professor of Classics at Luther College.

This week, Rob Dillard's series, "Being Muslim in Iowa," has highlighted Iowa's rich Muslim history. It's a history that includes the establishment of the Mother Mosque of America in Cedar Rapids nearly eighty years ago. This hour we'll explore Iowa's Muslim connections. We'll talk with Lisa Killinger, an Iowa woman who was raised Episcopalian and eventually converted to Islam. Also, Professor Mahmoud Hamed of Drake University and Miriam Amer, Executive Director of the Iowa chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

All this week, Iowa Public Radio reporter Rob Dillard has been exploring what it means to be Muslim in Iowa. Much of his reporting for this series has taken him to metropolitan areas, where most of the state’s Muslims live. But to conclude the week, Rob travels to a berg in northeast Iowa where one Muslim man has found a home.

Iowa Public Radio continues its week-long series called “Being Muslim in Iowa.” Reporter Rob Dillard has traveled extensively around the state, meeting a few of the estimated 20,000 Iowans who follow Islam. Most of these people have practiced the faith all of their lives, growing up in families who stretch their roots to the Middle East, Africa or Eastern Europe. But a handful of Iowans have converted to Islam from other religions. Today, Rob introduces us to three of them.

We’re looking at the lives of Muslims in Iowa this week. So far, reporter Rob Dillard has traced the history of Islam in the state, which dates back to the 19th century. He’s also asked a few Muslims living here why public opinion goes against their faith. Today, he looks at how Islam determines what food Muslims eat. The diets for strict adherents of Islamic law are free of pork and alcohol.  Today, Rob visits an eastern Iowa company that’s in the business of ensuring the food consumed by Muslims in the state and around the world meets this guideline. 

Iowa Public Radio is taking a look this week at Muslims living in the state. Opinion polls indicate Americans remain conflicted over Islam a decade after the terrorist attacks of 9-11. A survey by the Pew Research Center a year ago shows the percentage of people in the U.S. with a favorable opinion of Islam has tumbled from 41 percent in 2005 to 30 percent.  Muslims have been put on the defensive in recent years, asked to defend Islam against charges it’s a violent religion.

Today, Iowa Public Radio returns to its series, "Being in Iowa." Reporter Rob Dillard brings us the first of five installments on what it means to be Muslim in the state. A majority of Americans say they know very little about Islam. In fact, a recent Pew Research Poll showed a quarter of those surveyed said they knew nothing at all about the religion, which is followed by one-and-a-half billion people in the world. Muslims make up a small portion of Iowa’s population, well below one percent.

This weekend, Iowans are remembering the visit of Pope John Paul the Second during his first year as leader of the Catholic Church. It was 30 years ago when the Pope stopped at a country parish near Cumming. Later, Living History Farms was overwhelmed by more than 300,000 people who attended a Papal Mass. Original audio from the historic occasion was recorded on Oct. 4th, 1979.

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