Race and race relations

Courtesy photo

Asian-American civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs has traveled from her home in Detroit to

speak at Grinnell College as part of the campus celebration of Martin Luther King's birthday. She tells Iowa Public Radio's Pat Blank, she wasn't a fan of the idea when it was first proposed.  At 97, Boggs continues to be active with a program known as Detroit Summer.  It's a project that's been underway for several years involving the city's young people with activities such as gardening and renovating inner city buildings.

Touchstone Pictures

The passage of the 13th Amendment which outlaws slavery and involuntary servitude almost didn’t pass. Host Ben Kieffer speaks with historian Thomas Schwartz, one of the foremost experts on the Abraham Lincoln.

Ames Historical Society website

In 1971, a highway crew uncovered the bones of 28 people: Twenty-six were Caucasian. These remains were moved and reburied. Two were Native American. Their bones were sent to the Office of the State Archeologist.

John Pemble

In India, motorized rickshaws serve as taxis for short trips. In America, these vehicles are rare but over the weekend you could see them in Iowa albeit for a different purpose. A Des Moines businessman organized a rickshaw race, called “Tuk Tuk Goose”.

Hancher

Over a year ago the band “Stew and the Negro Problem” visited Iowa City to learn about the town and write songs based on their observations. Now they’re back in town and are going to perform the songs they've created. Host Charity Nebbe talks with band member Mark Stewart, "Stew", about his songs which were inspired by the black angel, flooding, and a local book shop.

David Bartemis / AuthorHouse

David Bartemis, a cancer survivor journeyed to climb Africa's highest mountain, Mount Kilimanjaro with the group “Above and Beyond Cancer.” Bartemis wrote about his experience with the 19 other cancer survivors 21 caregivers in the book, We Call Her Kili.

Talk of Iowa will also speak with cyclists of the Race Across America, an ultra marathon bicycle race across the United States, who hope to raise money for cancer research.

Iconic Black Women

Aug 8, 2012

Michelle Obama, Gabby Douglas, and Alice Walker are just three women who are reshaping the images of black women in America. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Grinnell College Associate Professor and author Lakesia Johnson about how black women have changed history and defied prejudice. Johnson explores the subject in her book "Iconic: Decoding Images of the Revolutionary Black Woman".

Bridging the Gap Between Rural, Urban Ag

Jul 16, 2012
Urban-Ag Academy / Facebook

In the Iowa Statehouse, and in statehouses across the nation, representatives are finding themselves separated—not by party lines, but by whether they come from an urban or rural district.  This weekend, the first national Urban Ag Academy was held in Des Moines. The goal? To look at that divide and to give a voice to minority farmers.

Bridging the Gap Between Rural, Urban Ag

Jul 16, 2012
Urban-Ag Academy / Facebook

In the Iowa Statehouse, and in statehouses across the nation, representatives are finding themselves separated—not by party lines, but by whether they come from an urban or rural district.  This weekend, the first Urban Ag Academy was held in Des Moines. The goal? To look at that divide and to give a voice to minority farmers. More than sixty state representatives from across the country came together to in an effort to help bridge the divide between city and country. 

On this Martin Luther King, Jr. Day we listen back to a program from September of last year. As part of IPR's Being in Iowa series, we examine the African-American experience in Iowa. Ben's guest's are Waterloo East High School Principal Dr. Willy Barney, counselor Shannon Harrington and Des Moines University Medical Director Dr. Carolyn Beverly.

All this week Rob Dillard has continued his series, "Being in Iowa," on Iowa Public Radio with a look at the African-American experience in the state. Today we wrap up this week's series with a discussion about the gaps that exist between African-Americans and the rest of the country: gaps in the areas of education, jobs, and health. We'll find out what's behind those gaps and how we can cover them. Guests include Waterloo East High School Principal Dr. Willy Barney, Shannon Harrington - the owner of a counseling business in Waterloo, and Des Moines University Medical Director Dr.

Today, Iowa Public Radio concludes its five-part series on African-Americans in the state. Reporter Rob Dillard has looked into the issues they face in the areas of education, employment, politics and health. He ends with a story about faith. The church has historically played a crucial role in the lives of many African-Americans.  It has been in the pews of black churches where they’ve found comfort and inspiration. Rob takes us to a Sunday-morning service in Waterloo where parishioners are charting their paths toward spirituality.

Iowa Public Radio’s week-long look at African-Americans in the state continues today with reporter Rob Dillard considering the multiple health risks they face. Blacks have a higher propensity than whites for such chronic diseases as diabetes and heart disease. The occurrence of infant deaths among African-Americans in Iowa is at three times the rate of whites. Rob talked to a number of health professionals about why this is and what, if anything, blacks can do to lower the risks.

Today, Iowa Public Radio continues its look at African-Americans living in Iowa. So far, reporter Rob Dillard has examined some of the educational and economic challenges they face. Now he turns to the political scene. There have been very few black politicians elected to public office in Iowa – none to statewide office. Rob met with some of these African-American leaders to find out what their time in office has meant to the state.

Today, we continue with our “Being in Iowa” series. All this week, IPR reporter Rob Dillard is asking the question, what does it mean to be African-American in the state? Nearly a third of all blacks in Iowa live below the poverty line. They earn on average less than half of white households, and their unemployment rate is more than double the overall state figure. Rob introduces us to three African-Americans, who are working to improve their economic standing with some assistance along the way.

Today, Iowa Public Radio returns to its series “Being in Iowa.”  Reporter Rob Dillard has been exploring what it means to be Latino, a military veteran, and Muslim in the state. Now, he shifts his attention to African-Americans. The 2010 census pegs the number of blacks living in Iowa at nearly 90-thousand, or just below three percent of the total population. Most of them are clustered around the urban centers of Des Moines, Cedar Rapids, Davenport and Waterloo.

American Folklife Center / Library of Congress

A tip from a public radio listener led to the oldest recordings in the Iowa Archives project. Learn the story behind the sacred songs of the Omaha Indians, thanks to the Federal Cylinder Project and the Library of Congress. Sounds from 1895-96, recorded in Macy, Nebraska.

Pages