Parenting

pawpaw67 / flickr

Parents want their kids to be safe, but some believe safety concerns have gone too far.

“This kind of environment of being suspicious of everybody around them and giving them no chance to be children or to play is just a horrible disservice to the children," says Barry Glassner, author of The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things: Crime, Drugs, Minorities, Teen Moms, Killer Kids, Mutant Microbes, Plane Crashes, Road Rage, & So Much More.

JOE LENCIONI

From characters like Cinderella to pop singers like Miley Cyrus, girls grow up in an environment rich in images of femininity. 

During the second episode of this two part series, host Charity Nebbe gets insight into the challenges and dangers girls face as they grow. To end the hour, we hear how the media influences their development.

Find part one of this series, "Raising Boys" click here. 

Jessica Lucia

Join host Charity Nebbe for the first of a two-part series about how children grow up.  

How do boys develop? What are their challenges and risks? During this Talk of Iowa program, Nebbe explores those questions with her guests and gets some perspective on how changes in education have affected how boys perform in the classroom.

For part two of this series, "Raising Girls" click here.

BrokenSphere / Wikimedia Commons

When did your parents first talk to you about sex? What did they say? 

chandrika221 / flickr

The drama of mood swings, impulsiveness and bizarre behaviors during adolescence
can take a toll on both teens and their parents.

Ken Hammond / Wikimedia Commons

Preeclampsia, a cardiovascular condition that affects expecting mothers and often causes premature births, kills 100,000 women worldwide every year. Previously, it’s been difficult to predict or prevent before the late stages of a pregnancy. But a few researchers at the University of Iowa may change that.

Emily Woodbury

Kate Duffus is pregnant for the fourth time, but the little girl she is carrying will not be her little girl.

Jan Egil Kristiansen

Today’s Quinnipiac University poll shows if the election for U.S. Senate were held today, 44 percent favor Democrat Bruce Braley and 40 percent favor Republican Joni Ernst.

Additionally, Quinnipiac finds Braley polling stronger with women by 11 percentage points, and Ernst holding a 4 percent lead with men.*

Porsupah Ree

Iowa’s forests, meadows, streams and subdivisions are full of baby animals right now, and every species has its own approach to parenting.

Today on Talk of Iowa, wildlife biologist Jim Pease joins to talk about parenting in the wild… with cliff swallows, rabbits, deer, bees, ducks, snakes, owls and others.

Elizabeth Heineman and her baby were healthy for her entire 9 month pregnancy; it was when she went into labor that something went wrong.

litlnemo

25 years ago an Iowa farmer and baseball fan started hearing voices in his corn field.  The film "Field of Dreams," touched millions in a profound way and left behind a baseball diamond in Dyersville that has taken on a life of its own.

On Being / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

What do dwarfs, prodigies, and deaf people have in common?

"In a curious way, differences that seem so isolating are actually what unites us and the thing we have most in common."

Raphael Goetter / derivitive work; https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Thirty-five years ago, Iowa City Firefighter Linda Eaton continued to breastfeed her child at work against orders from her supervisor, and a breastfeeding discussion was launched locally and gained national attention. Today, breastfeeding is treated a little differently, but it is also very different than other cultures.  Hear the remarkable story of Linda Eaton, and also about what businesses are required to provide for nursing customers and employees, the challenges of refugee and immigrant women who breastfeed, and what barriers might prevent Americans from breastfeeding.

Peter Merholz

Today, kids average six hours of screen time a day.  According to a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics, children whose parents limit screen time get more sleep, do better in school, have fewer behavior problems and lower their risk of obesity.  Doug Gentile, associate professor of psychology at Iowa State University, discusses the reverse results on the studies. 

RDECOM / flickr

For most of us middle school is the most awkward time of life. Kevin Brockmeier has plunged back into this difficult years with his new memoir, A Few Seconds of Radiant Filmstrip: A Memoir of Seventh Grade. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe revisits middle school with Brockmeier.

Later in the program, Director of the Iowa Youth Writing Project, Dora Malech, talks about the importance of getting kids writing, along with some tips and best practices.

Angie Harms

Listen back to Talk of Iowa's conversation on middle childhood. Middle childhood is the time between toddler-hood and the teen years. It’s a point in development when kids transition into a concrete way of thinking that's more categorical and less emotionally volatile.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with an anthropologist, pediatrician and counselor about what's going on inside those growing bodies and minds.

Raising Girls

Oct 10, 2013
Joe Lencioni

From Cinderella to Miley Cyrus our girls grow up in an environment rich in images of femininity.  Host Charity Nebbe gets insight into the challenges and dangers girls face as they grow and how the media influences their development.

Raising Boys

Oct 9, 2013
Jessica Lucia

Join host Charity Nebbe for the first of a two-part show about how children grow up.  Today, the focus is on boys.  How do they develop, what are their challenges and risks, and hear one perspective on how changes in education have affected how boys perform in the classroom.

When a child is born, so is a grandmother. Today on Talk of Iowa, we explore the 21st Century grandmother. Host Charity Nebbe talks with a scholar about how the roles of grandmothers have changed over the generations, and she receives some advice for modern grandma’s from the author of “The Grandparents Handbook.”

Guests on today's program include Victoria Brown, L.F. Parker Professor of History at Grinnell College, and Elizabeth LaBan, author of The Grandparent’s Handbook.

Grief in Childhood

Sep 10, 2013
Alan Stuart

No matter how hard we try as parents and teachers we cannot protect all children from tragedy.  Join host Charity Nebbe who talks with Dr. David Schonfeld about how tragedy affects children and what we can do to help the children in our lives find their way through grief.  Also on the program is Sonni Vierling, Coordinator of the Central Iowa Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Steering Committee.

 

Jeremy Wilburn / flickr

How sexually active is your teen? It turns out that 34% of Iowa high school students are currently sexually active. So what do you know about the sex-ed being taught at your kids’ school?

In the first part of our program, host Ben Kieffer learns about a nationally recognized sex education program that many Iowa schools use, which focuses on the financial impact of having a child. Then we broaden the discussion to find out what’s being taught in Iowa’s public schools and Catholic schools. What’s appropriate? What’s effective at preventing teen pregnancy?

Photo submitted by outreachprogram.org

Floyd Hammer and Kathy Hamilton of Union Iowa were recently recognized for their work fighting global hunger.  Their work involves getting packaged meals to hungry children in Africa and many other places.  Floyd and Kathy talk with host Ben Kieffer about their work and what is ahead for them.

In the second half of the show, hear from Iowa author John Price about his new memoir "Daddy Long Legs."

Emily Woodbury / IPR

When a parent is sent to prison, the lives of his or her children are changed forever. Today on Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe hosts a discussion on parents in prison. Maintaining and creating healthy bonds, and breaking the cycle of incarceration.

Credit MaST Charter Community School / mastcharter / Flickr

Children are very observant… they notice differences in skin colors, hair, clothes, ways of talking...  Host Charity Nebbe discusses how children learn about race and how parents can teach their children about race and ethnicity with Erin Winkler, associate professor of Africology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Madeleine Rogin, a kindergarten teacher and

Pengrin

Sunday is Father's Day.  Find out about the Father’s Day Index and hear about the changing role of dads, who are increasingly stay-at home parents. How is that fact affecting families and our stereotypes?  Guest host Ben Stanton gets advice for dads to communicate with kids using handwritten letters.  

John Pemble / IPR

IPR Morning Edition Host Sarah McCammon checks in with Statehouse Correspondent Joyce Russell on legislative news.

Middle Childhood

Jan 24, 2013

Middle childhood is the time between toddler-hood and the teen years. It’s a point in development when kids transition into a concrete way of thinking that's more categorical and less emotionally volatile.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with an anthropologist, pediatrician and counselor about what's going on inside those growing bodies and minds.

The Flu Season in Iowa

Jan 15, 2013
Wellcome Images / Flickr

Cold and flu season is upon us and the strain of flu going around this year seems to be particularly nasty. Host Ben Kieffer discusses how the flu is impacting Iowans this year with State Epidemiologist Dr. Patricia Quinlisk. We also hear about how to prevent and treat the flu for children with pediatrician Dr. Jody Murph and we’ll learn about how certain diseases jump from animals to humans with emerging infectious disease specialist Tara Smith. 

Baby Names

Jan 7, 2013
Michael Sarver / Flickr

What does your name say about you? What does the name you give you child mean for them?  Charity Nebbe talks about names with Jennifer Moss, founder and CEO of babynames.com and English Language expert Patricia O’Connor. Then, listeners share the stories behind their names.

Jeff Belmonte / Flickr

When same-sex marriage became legal in Iowa the state became a wedding destination, but some same-sex couples wanted more than just a marriage license. Charity Nebbe talks with couples who moved to Iowa in their search for marriage equality.

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