Hort Day

Marcus Obal / Wikimedia Commons

It has been a bad summer for grass.  On today's Horticulture Day we talk about that brown patch on your lawn. Will it come back to life when the rains come? Turf Grass Expert Dave Minner, along with horticulturist Richard Jauron, answer listener questions about their lawn and gardens.

Do you have what it takes to be a master gardener? Cindy Haynes, professor of horticulture and head of the Iowa Master Gardener Program at ISU, along with the program's new coordinator, Dennis Schrock, share tips on how to become a master gardener, further improve gardening skills, and master gardening projects throughout the state. Then, Richard Jauron from the Iowa State University Extensions to answer listeners' gardening questions.

Jean Hort / flickr

What do you know about spring-tail bugs? Today for Horticulture Day, we discuss these little critters, as well as taking all your gardening and planting questions.

Iowa City Public Library / Facebook

Some parents try to get  their children into the garden, but one man is bringing the garden straight to children.  Scott Koepke, garden educator at New Pioneer in Iowa City, talks about his efforts to get children into the garden at school, church, and throughout the community.  Then, Richard Jauron, Iowa State University horticulturist, and Laura Jesse with Iowa State University Plant Diagnostics lab, answer listeners' gardening questions.

Beatrice Murch / Flickr

The oak tree became Iowa's official state tree in 1961 but it has been an important part of the landscape for much longer than that. Host Charity Nebbe talks with DNR District Forester Mark Vitosh about the oak tree. Later, Associate Professor of Horticulture at Iowa State University joins the conversation to answer listeners gardening questions.

This summer it’s not really a question of making sure that the plants in your landscape thrive, it’s a question of making sure that they survive. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Iowa State University's  Extension Entomologist, Donald Lewis, and the Head of the Horticulture Department, Jeff Iles, about ways to reduce the stress on your plants right now and how to design a landscape that demands less water for the future

The drought continues throughout much of the state. On today's Horticulture Day Richard Jauron, horticulturist with the Iowa State University Extension, and Forester Mark Vitosh, talk about the stress the lack of rain has placed on trees.

Rick Fredericksen / Iowa Public Radio

Crops are not the only things wilting in the sweltering summer of 2012; cattle, the largest animals, on the farm are also under stress.

Some cattle producers are protecting their herds by putting them hoop barns, which are gaining acceptance across the Midwest. The simple structures are made from stretching fabric over strong metal arches, or hoops, providing vital shade and protection from rain, snow or sun.

Tanner Rowe, a cattle producer near Dallas Canter, Iowa, has found hoop barns can give cattle a much-needed break from sweltering heat.

Tom Woodward / Flickr

It’s official: Iowa is deep in the throes of a drought. State climatologist Harry Hillaker is calling it the worst drought since 1988. Yesterday Hillaker joined Governor Branstad at a town hall in Mount Pleasant. Farmers from across the state came to share concerns—but the most worried? It wasn’t those with thirsty grain crops;  it was livestock farmers. 

Cindy Haynes, an associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, shares information about several upcoming Demonstration Garden Field Days, where the public can catch a glimpse of ongoing research and learn about gardening techniques. Charity also talks with Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture specialist, to tackle listener's gardening questions.

Continuous temperatures in the triple digits with limited rain can certainly put stress on any plant or garden. Charity talks with Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, Richard Jauron, about helping plants battle the heat.  ISU Extension Vegetable Production Specialist, Ajay Nair, also talks about incorporating fruits and vegetables into a home garden.

It’s a practice that improves your local environment and is a rewarding way to learn about the animals in your back yard.  On the next Hort Day, we look at tailoring your garden to the needs of wildlife. ISU Extention's Rebecca Christoffel and Richard Jauron join the discussion and answer your gardening questions.

For many decades Colorado Blue Spruce were a very popular choice for windbreaks in Iowa.  Now a lot of those trees are dead or dying.  On today's Talk of Iowa it’s Horticulture Day. D.N.R. District Forester Mark Vitosh of Iowa City and I.S.U. Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron will be here.  We’ll talk about planting new windbreaks and rehabilitating old ones.  We’ll also be answering your questions about plants and trees.   We look forward to your questions!

 

It's summer and gardens are buzzing with numerous insects. Host Charity Nebbe talks with Richard Jauron and Donald Lewis from the Iowa State University Extension about how some insects have made an early appearance this year and some upcoming garden deadlines. 

Some young gardeners in Ames got a surprise package from the White House last weekend.  This hour, it’s Horticulture Day on Talk of Iowa with Charity Nebbe.   Charity talks with a student from Kate Mitchell School in Ames about gardening with Michelle Obama.  Also on the program,  Richard Jauron and Cindy Haynes of Iowa State University will be here to answer your lawn, garden and plant questions.

Great news for Iowa strawberry lovers: the crop this year is two-weeks early!  And even better, growers report the berries are especially sweet and abundant.  It's Hort Friday on Talk of Iowa, and we'll hear about this season's strawberries from Judy and Dean Henry, owners of "The Berry Patch," located south of Nevada.  Richard Jauron and Linda Naeve of Iowa State University Extension will add their berry expertise to the conversation and will answer your lawn, garden and plant questions as well.

The weather has been windy and dry, but gardens are still growing. On Horticulture Day host, Charity Nebbe, talks with a Des Moines meteorologist about the recent dry weather. Charity also talks with horticulturist Richard Jauron, from Iowa State University Extension about growing conditions and what to do during a dry spell.

ISU Plant Disease Clinic

You've selected the right plant for your landscape, picked a good spot and planted it well, but your work is not done. On today's Horticulture Day program, we'll look at ways to keep your plants and trees healthy. Including identifying insect or disease problems, why proper pruning is essential and how to avoid stressing your plants and trees. Charity's guests are Iowa State University Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron and D.N.R. District Forester Mark Vitosh.

Hort Day: Tomatoes

May 11, 2012

You say tomato, I say to-mah-to, you say cherry, I say roma--on today's Talk of Iowa, it’s Horticulture Day. The most popular homegrown vegetable is, of course, the tomato. We’ll talk about selecting varieties, planting and caring for tomatoes with horticulturists Richard Jauron and Linda Naeve of Iowa State University Extension. We'll look forward to your calls, too.

The danger of frost is dwindling, it’s time to get out and plant. On today's Talk of Iowa it’s Horticulture Day. We’ll talk about what to plant and how to plant it. Laura Jesse and Erika Saalau of the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic of Iowa State University will be on hand to tell us what to watch for this spring as our plants grow.

Insects got a head start this year. On today's program, it’s Horticulture Day. Entomologist Dr. Donald Lewis of Iowa State University will be here. We’ll talk about red admiral butterflies, European sawflies and why we’re seeing so many moths. Horticulturist Richard Jauron of I.S.U. Extension will also be here to answer your lawn, garden and plant questions.

Cool temperatures, plentiful moisture and a long growing season ahead make this the perfect time to plant a tree. 

DNR Forester Mark Vitosh talks to Charity about selecting, planting and caring for trees.  Iowa State University Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron will answer all of your lawn and gardening questions.

This April is now acting a lot more like a typical April in Iowa. Horticulturists Cindy Haynes and Richard Jauron of Iowa State University are our guests. We’ll talk about how the freezing overnight temperatures of late have affected fruit trees and other plants around the state and we'll take your questions.

Our unusually warm late winter and early spring weather has transformed the landscape and lulled some of us into a false sense of security. On this week's Horticulture program, Charity speaks to Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture and Linda Naeve, Iowa State University Extension Value Added Agriculture, about what we can plant right now what we should absolutely not plant now, even if the weather is so nice.

Iowa State University horticulture students are sharing their knowledge with students around the world. This hour, on Talk of Iowa's Horticulture Day, we’ll talk about a school garden project in the Virgin Islands and, of course we’ll talk about your garden projects. Charity's guests are horticulturists Richard Jauron of Iowa State University Extension and Jennifer Bousselot, a lecturer and Master Gardener Coordinator at Iowa State University.

Our March warmth and sunshine has brought out leaves, flowers and a whole lot of bugs. Iowa State University Extension Entomologist Donald Lewis will be here to explain why we’re suddenly seeing tiny gnats all over the place and to answer your questions about the other insects that are emerging. Iowa State University Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron will be here to answer all of your lawn and gardening questions.

Can you picture your back yard as a small farm--with herbs, flowers and vegetables growing in place of the Kentucky Blue Grass? It can happen, if you learn a few basics. On today's Horticulture Friday, we hear about a spring course from Iowa State University Extension, "Learn How to Have a Homegrown Lifestyle." It will be offered at 11 Iowa locations beginning March 29. It's for folks who want to reconnect with the land, grown food for their own use and create a sustainable landscape. Andy Larson of ISU Extension will tell us more about the course.

For the last seven years faculty, staff and students from Iowa State University have been traveling to Uganda as part of a service learning program. Gail Nonnecke, a professor of horticulture at ISU has been involved from the very start. Charity talks with her about the program and how she has seen gardens and students grow during her visits to Uganda. Horticulturist Richard Jauron will also be here and they will answer your questions about plants in your life.

The growing season hasn’t begun, but it might be time for you to get busy in your yard or garden. On this "Hort Day" on Talk of Iowa, D.N.R. District Forester Mark Vitosh of Iowa City and I.S.U. Extension Horticulturist Richard Jauron are here. We’ll talk about spring pruning and starting seeds and we’ll answer your questions.

When maple trees experience the freezing nights and warm days of late winter, the sap starts to slowly rise. It's "Hort Friday" on Talk of Iowa, and we'll talk about maple syrup production. It's one of North America's oldest agricultural crops and there are a few commercial producers in Northeast Iowa. Guests are Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture and Jesse Randall, Iowa State University Extension Forestry. We'll also answer your questions about the plants in your life.
 

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