Hobbies

Richard / flickr

What is at the heart of the American dream?

Former Iowa State lawmaker John Wittneben has more than 4,000 assembled puzzles in his home, and he’s not the only one.

Keturah Stickann

False death reports, spaghetti growing on trees, and more than one discovery of evidence that proves that a mythical creature is real… we’ve all learned to be a little skeptical on April 1st.

Today on April Fool's day - the art of the prank.

Host Charity Nebbe explores our rich history of hoaxes and practical jokes with Kembrew McLeod, author of Pranksters and University of Iowa Associate Professor of Communication Studies. She also sits down with Leo Landis, from the State Historical Museum of Iowa, to discuss Iowa's role in the hoax of the Cardiff Giant.

Ragged Records / facebook

Today on River to River, we explore the continuing changes in the music industry...including the fact that more and more users are listening from large online libraries of music – like Rhapsody, Spotify, or Pandora – rather than purchasing individual songs or albums. We also discuss why vinyl records are making a comeback.

Mark Botham

What is at the heart of the American dream? Bigger houses, fancier clothes, faster cars... or is it about having time for family, friends and community?

For decades University of Iowa Associate Professor Benjamin Hunnicutt has studied why we work as hard as we do, why we’re work obsessed, and how attitudes about work and leisure in our culture have changed over time. His is also the author of Free Time: The Forgotten American Dream.

On economic progress -

Denise Stejskal

Today on River to River, we catch up with Denise and Grant Stejskal. Native Iowans from North Liberty, they pitched their lives overboard a year ago to sail the Pacific Ocean. We sit down with them to find out what it's like to trade your house for a sailboat, what fish you should avoid eating, what to do when your boat is in the coordinates of a live missile practice, and what it's like to live on the sea with your significant other.

Charity Nebbe

Host Charity Nebbe celebrates acts of kindness by interviewing the people whose lives have been positively affected by others.

Clay Masters / IPR

   

Thanks to tight competition, hog farmers are feeling a push to expand or get out of the business. That means indoor confined animal feeding operations – or CAFOs – are growing even in the most environmentally sensitive areas.

John Pemble / Iowa Public Radio

Iowa's cultural and economic shift away from the family farm created serious problems for the state.  It has also created opportunities for reinvention and creativity.

Tito Perez

Name a famous person who appears regularly on NPR. His first name can be a noun or a verb, and his last name sounds like an article of clothing. Puzzlemaster Will Shortz joins Host Charity Nebbe to talk about how the New York Times crossword puzzle is put together and a little about his love of table tennis.  And hear about real-world problem solving with Invent Iowa, and one particular invention made by middle school girls in Council Bluffs.

Joe Lencioni / flickr

Today on River to River, we explore the continuing changes in the music industry...including the fact that more and more users are listening from large online libraries of music – like Rhapsody, Spotify, or Pandora – rather than purchasing individual songs or albums. We also discuss why vinyl records are making a comeback.

Grant and Denise Stejskal

This week Hy-Vee's retired chairman and CEO, Ric Jurgens, was honored by the Food Marketing Institute. On the first half of this River to River show, host Ben Kieffer listens back to his 2012 interview with Jurgens about the evolution of food shopping.

Jaarsma Bakery / Facebook

In the 1890's Iowans saw some strange things in the sky. Charity Nebbe talks with historian Steven Arts about Iowa’s UFO sightings. Then, if you’re looking for Iowa’s oldest water tower, Iowa’s oldest continuously operating hotel or if you just love Iowa trivia, Fred Stark is your man. Fred shares his extensive wealth of knowledge about the state.

Clay Masters / IPR

The attention often centers on agriculture when a drought hits. But new Iowa Department of Natural Resources numbers show the state’s stream flows are well below normal and groundwater levels are reaching historic lows. There's a ripple effect in how the drought will affect the state’s fish.

Quilting in Iowa

Sep 25, 2012
Colorful quilt
Kate Henderson / Flickr

Since the early days of settlement Iowa women have demonstrated their skill, expressed their creativity, and kept their families warm through making quilts. Talk of Iowa explores the history of quilting and talks with representatives of the Iowa Quilter's Guild and the Kalona Quilt and Textile Museum and what their parts are in keeping the art of quilting alive.

Listen back to host, Ben Kieffer’s, conversation with Kevin Connolly, a photographer who was born without legs. He traveled the world taking pictures of people reacting to him -- a legless man zooming by on a skateboard. Then, Conor Grennan talks with Ben about his work helping Nepalese children who are victims of child trafficking.

Iowa State University

He’s been dubbed the ‘runner without a country’ – Guor Marial is a 28-year-old marathon runner and refugee from the newly independent African nation of South Sudan. After Marial escaped Sudan as a child, he came to the United States and competed in cross country at Iowa State University. Though he’s a U.S. resident, he’s not a citizen and South Sudan does not yet have a national Olympic body, but after months of consideration, the International Olympic Committee ruled Marial could compete under the Olympic flag – joining three others who will do the same during the London games.

78s Galore

Mar 12, 2009
www.claxtonola.com


An Iowa City man who has been collecting 78 rpm recordings most of his life, is now at 7,000 and counting. His phonograph collection is equally impressive. We sample the recordings from the record vault of Dan Daly. Sounds from early to mid 1900s, recorded across America.