Hillary Clinton

Billionaire Donald Trump won seven of the Super Tuesday primary contests to take a commanding lead in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton also claimed victory in seven of the states voting Tuesday, making it all but impossible for Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders to overtake her in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Joyce Russell, Sarah Boden, Amy Mayer/IPR

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won the Iowa caucuses for the Republican presidential nomination, while the Democratic race between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was considered neck-and-neck early this morning.

In a speech at the Iowa State Fairgrounds, Cruz thanked Iowa Republicans while also referencing scripture, Reagan Democrats, and what he calls “courageous conservatives”.

Photo by Amy Mayer

For almost a year, presidential candidates have been crisscrossing Iowa, wooing voters in a state that relies on agriculture for about one-third of its economy. But even here, most voters live in cities or suburbs and don't have a first-hand connection to the farm.

That makes it difficult to get candidates talking about food system issues from school lunches, to crop supports, to water quality. Yet these all fall under the federal agriculture department. If candidates aren't talking about them in Iowa, it's possible they'll be left out of the campaigns entirely.

A new poll suggests Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton are in a statistical dead heat, with five days remaining before the Iowa Caucuses. 

Wednesday's Quinnipiac poll has the Vermont Senator favored by 49 percent of likely Democratic caucus participants surveyed, and the former Secretary of State favored by 45 percent. This four-point spread is within the margin of error. 

Pat Blank/IPR

The Iowa Caucuses are a week away, and candidates for the Republican and Democratic presidential nominations are out in force, rallying their supporters and trying to make sure they caucus next Monday. Democratic front runners Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders held a combined 13 campaign events this weekend, mostly in eastern Iowa. 

Iowa Public Radio / Sarah Boden

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says though many of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders's ideas sound good in theory, "In theory isn't enough.  A president has to deal in reality."

While speaking to a crowd of roughly 600 people at Simpson College in Indianola on Thursday, Clinton said she wants to build on President Obama’s work with the Affordable Care Act to get more Americans healthcare coverage. In contrast, Clinton says Sanders' approach would create gridlock since he wants, "...to start over from scratch with a whole new system." 

Amy Mayer/IPR

At an event in Ames Tuesday, Hillary Clinton picked up the endorsement of the Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence. The rally at Iowa State University kicked off with a somber tone as leaders of the Brady Campaign recounted stories of loved ones lost to gun violence. Clinton says their support is motivating her to keep gun-sales reform at the center of the campaign.

Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton continued to spar last night in Des Moines. With the Iowa caucuses less than three weeks away, Clinton has been attacking Sanders for votes he made that she says shield gun makers and sellers. At the Iowa Brown and Black Forum last night, moderator Jorge Ramos pressed Sanders about it.

Clay Masters / IPR

Democratic presidential candidates are responding to President Obama’s op-ed in the New York Times. The president wrote he will not support any candidate – even in his own party – who does not support common-sense gun reform.

hillaryclinton.com file photo

Former President Bill Clinton stopped by the New Bo City Market in Cedar Rapids during the noon lunch hour today.  It’s where Hillary Clinton, who is campaigning to be the next president, held a rally on Monday.

After handshaking and picturing taking, the former President went on to the nearby Czech and Slovak Museum to promote her candidacy.  He arrived about an hour later than scheduled but that didn’t seem to bother the estimated 500 people waiting.  Clinton spent most of the 50-minutes appearance listing Hillary’s achievements.

Joyce Russell/IPR

After some upheaval last week, the race for the Democratic nomination for President has mostly shaken down to a two-person contest between former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders.   And in Des Moines on Saturday, their supporters were among the thousands of activists gathered for the annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner.

College student Katya Wendt came down from Minnesota with the group Saint Olaf for Bernie Sanders.   She has her talking points down.

Clay Masters/IPR

The three remaining Democratic presidential candidates rallied thousands of supporters in Des Moines last night, at the state party’s annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner.  During the Saturday’s speeches, Senator Sanders drew contrasts to Clinton by talking about his early opposition to the war in Iraq, the keystone XL pipeline and the Defense of Marriage Act. Janice Payne is a retired lab tech from Des Moines. She attended a rally for Senator Sanders before the dinner. “He’s more for the middle-class and he’s not about being bought by the upper echelon.

Brookings Institution / Flickr

The first Democratic debate of the 2016 presidential election season saw hardball questions from Anderson Cooper on electability, gun control, and a range of other issues. While media organizations like Politico claim Clinton won by a landslide, online polls at Facebook and Slate show Bernie winning by the same. Dennis Goldford, political scientist at Drake University, claims the issue lies in representation. 

"The internet is not representative of the electorate as a whole--."

Clay Masters/IPR file photo

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is vowing to move aggressively in controlling gun violence.  And, in a campaign stop in Davenport today, she took a swipe at a comment Republican Jeb Bush made last week after the shootings at a community college in Oregon.

“We can’t tolerate that,” she said, “this doesn’t just happen, this isn’t stuff that happens.  We let it happen and we have to act against those people who should not have guns in the first place.”

Clay Masters/IPR

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton says she opposes the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. During a campaign stop in Des Moines, the former Secretary of State had not taken a position until now because she thought the issue would be resolved.

Clinton says she did not want to interfere with the President’s ongoing decision-making regarding the controversial extension of the Canadian crude oil pipeline. But during the campaign stop at Moulton Elementary School, a college student asked where she stood on its construction.

Pat Blank/IPR

When the second GOP presidential candidate debate is broadcast on Wednesday night, Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton says she’ll be watching.

At the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls Monday afternoon she told an audience of about 500 that when she saw the first debate on Fox News, she found it entertaining.  She says there’s not much difference between the 16 Republican candidates.

John Pemble/IPR file

Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders leads rival Hillary Clinton by one point among Iowa caucus-goers, in a poll released this morning by Quinnipiac University.  It found 41-percent of likely Democratic participants back Sanders, while 40-percent chose former Secretary of State Clinton. 

The poll has a margin of error of plus-or-minus 3.4 percentage points.  

Asya Acka/Radio Iowa

Democratic candidate for President Hillary Clinton rolled out her plans for rural America during a stop in Ankeny Wednesday.  

Clinton addressed a crowd of about 250 in the FFA building at Des Moines Area Community College,  with a John Deere tractor as a backdrop. 

“I know it’s a little unusual for a candidate for President to be making a speech about this at a community college instead of a barn or bale of hay,” Clinton says.  “But at least we got a tractor,” she joked.

Clay Masters / IPR

CM: You’ve been spending a lot of time in Iowa recently, making a lot of weekend trips. Tell me what are two to three words that you would use to describe Iowa?

HC: Open, committed, and beautiful.

CM: Plain and simple?

HC: Yea, absolutely.

Iowa Public Radio / John Pemble

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton is airing her first campaign TV ads Tuesday. They are playing in Iowa, and fellow early-voting state New Hampshire.

The commercials highlight Clinton’s mother’s difficult childhood and the candidate’s pre-Washington career. While campaigning Clinton often speaks of her late mother and baby granddaughter. 

Sarah Boden / Iowa Public Radio

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton says none of the emails she sent or received using her private server while Secretary of State  were marked “classified” at the time. Clinton told a gathering at the 3rd Congressional District Democratic Central Committee in Winterset on Saturday that she has “no idea” what the emails contained.

On Thursday, Inspector General Charles McCullough said four emails contained classified information, though they were not marked as such. 

Clay Masters/IPR file photo

These are the remarks, as delivered, by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton at a campaign rally June 14, 2015 at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines.

Photo by John Pemble/IPR

Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders wrapped up a three day campaign swing through Iowa Sunday, and he had harsh words for Hillary Clinton on the issue of international trade.  

At a state fairgrounds rally, Clinton said she can’t say whether she supports a bill in Congress giving the President so-called fast track trade authority to facilitate a Pacific trade deal.  

Clinton says she needs to see what’s really in the bill.

Joyce Russell/IPR

Hillary Clinton officially launched her campaign for the Democratic nomination for president this weekend.   On Sunday she wrapped up a two-day organizing tour of Iowa.     An army of volunteers, clipboards in hand, began the hard work of lining up Democrats to come out and caucus for Clinton in February.   

Doors were scheduled to open at 10:30 in the morning for an event at the Elwell Center at the state fairgrounds. Middle school English teacher Mike Sorenson from Fredericksburg was standing in line well before that on a cloudy humid day.

Al Madrigal / (c) 2015 Steffen Schmidt

Clinton broke her media silence earlier this week when she took questions from reporters in a bicycle shop in Cedar Falls. Though she's had a consistent presence in Iowa, analyst Steffen Schimdt says the campaign has yet to truly kick off.

"There is no Clinton campaign. What there is is these little weird visits to New Hampshire and Iowa, meeting with people in bicycle shops with very carefully hand-picked crowds of individuals who are favorable to Hillary Clinton. These are not open events, they're not big events, she's not rolling out big themes."

Takin' Care Of "Business"

May 19, 2015
IPR's Pat Blank

  Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton held a roundtable with small business owners in a bike shop in Cedar Falls. She says her focus on small business is a crucial component of her fight to help families get ahead and stay ahead. She also says she’s in favor of trade deals like the Trans Pacific Partnership, but it’s a work in progress.

Clay Masters / IPR

As spending on Congressional and Presidential campaigns continues to grow, politicians are starting to voice support for measures to try and get some of that money out of politics. 

Presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton voiced her support for a Constitutional amendment to limit campaign spending last week in a speech at Kirkwood Community College, and Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina has also spoken in favor of taking a hard look at how much money is being spent on elections. 

Dean Borg / Iowa Public Radio

Two more candidates have entered the 2016 race for president. Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy on Sunday in an online video, and Marco Rubio, a one-term senator from Florida, announced his candidacy Monday at a rally in Miami. 

During this River to River program, host Ben Kieffer talks with Iowa Public Radio’s Dean Borg about Clinton’s first campaign stop yesterday in Monticello, Iowa.

Photo by Clay Masters

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton finished her brief two-day swing through Iowa today with a roundtable discussion with small business owners just outside Des Moines. Clinton is the only major Democratic presidential candidate to announce she’s seeking her party’s nomination. 

Journalists far outnumbered the handful of small business owners at this roundtable at Capital City Fruit in Norwalk. After a stop at a community college the day before, Clinton turned her attention to the job world.

Dean Borg / IPR

Hillary Clinton is choosing intimate, small group conversations as she begins campaigning in Iowa, seeking the Democratic Presidential nomination.

However, during a roundtable discussion in Kirkwood Community College’s auto mechanics shop-classroom outside Monticello, Clinton outlined big goals.

“We need to build the economy of tomorrow, not yesterday, she told a group of students and school administrators. “We need to strengthen families and communities, because that’s where it starts,” she added.

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