Healthcare

Iowans on Medicaid

Apr 29, 2013
Clay Masters / IPR

Right now, under federal law states have to figure out how to insure the poor. They can either expand the joint federal/state healthcare program for low-income people called Medicaid… or they can get waivers and devise their own plans. Democrats who control the Iowa Senate are at odds with Republican Governor Terry Branstad has introduced his own plan. IPR Statehouse correspondent Clay Masters wanted to get away from the politics and talk to Iowans who receive these services. 

Zoobiquity

Apr 9, 2013
Flickr / big-ashb

What happens when doctors look at human medicine through the lens of veterinary medicine? While the gulf between the two disciplines is wide, there are many parallels between humans and our animal counterparts.  Dr.

Photo by John Pemble

IPR's Joyce Russell joins Sarah McCammon for an update on news from the Iowa General Assembly. 

John Pemble / IPR

IPR's Joyce Russell and Sarah McCammon check in on news from the Iowa Statehouse.

Clay Masters / IPR

Democrats in the Iowa senate say they’re extending an olive branch to Republican Governor Terry Branstad regarding their proposal to expand Medicaid in the state. The governor is opposed to expanding the joint federal state healthcare program for the poor mainly because he doesn’t believe the feds can continue to pay for it. Democrats are offering an opt-out provision in case federal funding levels would change.

As Iowans are  filing their state income tax returns, there’s a controversy at the statehouse over one of the questions on the tax form.       The question  aims to locate working Iowans who may be eligible for subsidized health insurance for their children.   Some  Republicans in the Iowa House say that  goes beyond what the government needs to know when you file your taxes.

Donating A Kidney

Feb 21, 2013
John Pemble / IPR

Just a few weeks ago in a three day period, five people received kidney transplants thanks to something called a kidney paired transplant chain. Today on Talk of Iowa, we find out about this life saving chain of generosity and talk to a transplant surgeon, donors and recipients of kidney transplants. Also, we learn about an organization called My Angel Foundation, a non-profit focused on inspiring Iowans to become registered organ, eye and tissue donors.

Therapy Animals

Dec 20, 2012
Army Medicine / Flickr

One of the ways the people of Newtown, Connecticut are recovering from last week's shooting is with the aid of therapy dogs. Animal assisted therapy is a type of therapy which uses trained animals to reduce anxiety and facilitate healing.

Ben Kieffer talks with three Iowa therapists who works with animals. They discuss the history of animal assisted therapy, how the treatments work, and the special animals involved in these therapies.

Iowa Rural Health Assocation website

At times, people living in rural Iowa struggle for access to medical specialists. The nearest pediatrician or cardiologist may be hours from a patient's home. River to River examines the state of rural health care in Iowa and now that health care is the law of the land, how will health care change in Iowa?

Office of Governor Branstad / Facebook

The Affordable Care Act calls on states to let federal officials know by Friday if they plan to launch their own healthcare exchanges. As Iowa Public Radio’s Clay Masters reports, Governor Branstad’s office says meeting the deadline will be challenging.

Detailing Trauma

Nov 5, 2012
UI Press

The human body can be subjected to a variety of physical and spiritual inflictions and yet it often finds resilience to continue to love in spite of the pain. Charity Nebbe talks with author Arianne Zwartjes about her reflections in her new book Detailing Trauma: A Poetic Anatomy.

  

Sarah McCammon / IPR

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month. And in cities across the country, crowds dressed in pink have been running and walking in the Race for the Cure. But some participants – and their dollars – have been missing from these fundraisers for the Susan G. Komen Foundation this year.

After a public outcry over a decision early this year to stop funding Planned Parenthood, the organization quickly reversed its position.

As Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah McCammon reports, Komen officials say participation is slowly coming back.

Pat Blank

A northeast Iowa woman is part of a study that’s helping unravel a rare heart condition that strikes young, otherwise healthy people. 42- year- old Tracy Hjelle (YELL-ee)  is the picture of health, she’s athletic and is in great shape, that’s because she’s the pitching coach for the Luther College softball team, but her world turned upside down on a Sunday morning in April as she and the team were preparing to leave Decorah for a game in Wisconsin.

Office of Governor Branstad / Facebook

Starting Wednesday, Governor Terry Branstad starts paying 20 percent of his healthcare premium costs. He signed an executive order last month allowing other state workers to do the same. It has pushing the difference between private and public sector compensation back into the spotlight.

Right now Iowa is among only a handful of states where public workers don’t pay any of those costs.

Dr. Alan Koslow / Facebook

An Iowa doctor is preparing to come home after spending the past couple of weeks doing relief work in a part of the world facing one of the worst refugee crises in memory.

Dr. Alan Koslow is a vascular surgeon from Des Moines. He landed in South Sudan about two weeks ago, in an area where tens of thousands of refugees have been fleeing violence and famine across the border in Sudan.

Koslow spoke with IPR's Sarah McCammon through an internet phone from the South Sudanese capital of Juba.

Civil War Medicine

Jul 9, 2012

More than six hundred thousand men died during the Civil War and twice as many men died of disease than of gunshot wounds. Charity talks with Dr. Kendall Reed from Des Moines University medical practices during the war and how the period led to numerous medical advancements.  Later, Lester Menke,  author of  “When Apples Had No Worms”, shares his stories from growing up in the 1920s and 30s.

Bill Leaver is CEO of Iowa Health System, the state's largest network of hospitals and clinics.  He says the ruling will pave the way for more streamlined and prevention-focused healthcare.

Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld the health care mandate proposed by President Obama. Today on "River to River", we hear what Iowans have to say about the decision. We also speak with political science professor, Dennis Goldford, on how the ruling may affect Iowa voters. Later in the program, Drake University President David Maxwell joins us as part of our summer series of conversations with Iowa university and college presidents. We’ll talk about what private universities can do to be attractive and affordable during a challenging economy.

Daniela Hartmann / flickr

July 1 is a big date for mental health care in Iowa—that’s the day funding switches over to a redesigned model. The legislature approved a plan to equalize mental health care funding for low income residents across the state.  Some counties are crying foul, saying programs will be gutted. But other’s say the change they say finally gives all counties a level playing field.

Learning to speak English is one thing, learning to speak Iowan may be something else entirely. Iowa, especially in its more rural areas, has many foreign-born physicians practicing in clinics and hospitals. In an archive program from last September, we’ll find out about an innovative program in Mason City that helps doctors understand our state with courses like "Topics for Small Talk with Iowans." We'll talk to the teachers in the program at Mercy Medical Center North Iowa, University of Northern Iowa professors Mark Grey and Michele Devlin.

Revamping mental health care remains a work in progress at the Iowa Statehouse. Host Joyce Russell talks with advocates, providers, county officials and legislators who are working on a redesign of the mental health system. The hope is that the mentally ill will be able to get the help they need, no matter where they live in the state. One of the issues stalling progress on the legislation, is cost. Join in the conversation to discuss the system as it exists today, and proposed changes.

It started as blood-typing and has advanced to designing cancer treatments specific to the cellular makeup of a tumor. And in the not-so-distant future, it will mean looking at a patient's DNA to determine the best course of treatment for a variety of diseases. In a program that originally aired last November, Ben talks with guests about the technology that allows doctors to use the right medicines for the right patients at the right time, and the ethical and cost considerations of unlocking the secrets that lie on our DNA.

Host Ben Kieffer talks with PBS senior correspondent and former “Talk of the Nation” host Ray Suarez who will deliver the 2012 UI Health Care Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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