Education

The committee evaluating candidates for the University of Iowa’s next President is moving into the process final stages.

In a telephone conference this afternoon, the Search Committee heard from a representative of the Parker Executive Search, President Laurie Wilder.  She told the committee forty-four individuals had submitted material for consideration.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Education and landing a job are inextricably linked in the minds of most Americans, but after the Great Recession it wasn't as clear whether getting a college diploma meant getting, and keeping, a job.

Saba Ali, associate professor in the College of Education at the University of Iowa, says that while statistics bear out the correlation between college degrees and higher paying employment, the question of whether college prepares students to do their jobs well is more nuanced.

West Midlands Police / Flickr

The Burlington Community School district is among the first in the nation to outfit administrators at each of the district's eight school buildings with body cameras. The district is already outfitted with fixed cameras, which Superintendent Pat Coen says have proven useful.

Rob Dillard, Iowa Public Radio

More than 100 students at Dowling Catholic High School in West Des Moines staged a walkout Wednesday afternoon to protest the school’s decision to deny a former substitute teacher full-time employment because he is openly gay.

School administrators sent a letter to parents this week saying they were not offering the teacher a contract “owing to a personal situation at odds with Church teaching.”

Dowling sophomore Grace Mumm helped organize the rally. She says the action will not lead to employment for Tyler McCubbin at Dowling. But she still thinks it delivers a message.

Jane Kettering, St. Ambrose University

    There is a Middle East Institute on the campus of St. Ambrose University in Davenport.

The immediate question that comes to mind is why a Catholic University in the middle of America has created an academic institute focused on the Arab world.

FLICKR / TOBIAS LEEGER

The state legislature yesterday sent a bill to Gov. Terry Branstad setting August 23 as the earliest date students can go back to class. The bill attempts to balance the interests of Iowa K-12 education and the state's tourism industry. Not everyone is pleased.

Lisa Riggs is president of the Travel Federation of Iowa and general manager of the Danish Windmill in Elk Horn. The windmill was shipped from Denmark to the west-central Iowa town in 1975.

Flickr / Tobias Leeger

The Iowa House passed a bill on the contentious issue of school start dates for Iowa K-12 students today. The legislation allows middle and elementary schools that follow year-round calendars to set an early school start date; however, all other schools could start only as early as August 23.

State Rep. Mary Mascher, a Democrat from Iowa City, voted against the bill. She says the one-size-fits-all start date for high schools is a bad approach.

John Pemble, Iowa Public Radio

The 2015 Iowa Teacher of the Year is a middle school Spanish teacher from Ecuador, who is on a mission to introduce more multiculturalism into classrooms.

John Pemble / IPR

Iowa’s Board of Regents has released the names of a 21-person search committee that’ll be recommending candidates to be the University of Iowa’s next president.

Photo by John Pemble

At Findley Elementary School in Des Moines, art teacher Lisa Hesse begins her morning class by standing with her students in a circle as relaxing music plays.

Judy Baxter / Flickr

For years the common wisdom was that kids need to sit still and listen in order to concentrate. New research suggests that's not the case.

Photo by John Pemble

Junior high and high school students from across the state rallied at the capitol today.

Joyce Russell/IPR

Academic counselors from the University of Iowa will be on the campus of the American Institute of Business in Des Moines this week.

John Pemble/IPR

Iowa state senators today questioned Greene County social worker Sherry Bates, Governor Branstad’s nominee to the Iowa Board of Regents.

Cedar Rapids Democrat Liz Mathis did not vote to send Bates’s nomination to the full Senate, saying she wants more information about the nominee. Mathis says there’s some concern that Bates is registered as an independent on the state’s voter rolls, instead of Republican or Democrat.

John Pemble/IPR

The AIB College of Business announced new details today about the gifting of its 20-acre Des Moines campus to the University of Iowa.  

The campus will be renamed the Regional Regents Center. It's located two miles from the Des Moines airport and is comprised of 17 buildings, including apartment-style student housing. 

Carl Wycoff

A bill in the Iowa house would allow school districts to levy taxes to supplement transportation costs, but some say the legislation doesn't do enough to help rural districts.

Many school districts in rural Iowa cover a large geographic area, so a sizable portion of general operating budgets is spent on busing at the expense of other expenditures like text books and teacher salaries. Enabling school boards to raise property or income taxes to address transportation costs would allow districts more budgeting leeway. 

Amy Mayer/IPR

Children today are immersed in technology. Often, they are passive consumers. But in some schools, even kindergarteners are learning computer programming.

Cornell College Photo

The new emphasis on funding Iowa’s three state universities according to the number of students who are state residents is dramatically increasing competition.  The 26 private and 15 community colleges in the state are preparing.

Rachel Barton Pine, who performed recently in Ames as part of the period-instrument group Trio Settecento, has just released her first recording with the Academy of St. Martin in the Fields and Sir Neville Marriner - and last week, she talked with me about it. The set includes all of Mozart's concertos for violin and it's outstanding. In 0ur interview, she talks about why each concerto is a mini-opera, the value of writing your own cadenzas, the lessons a "modern-instrument" player can learn from playing period instruments (although she uses her modernized Guarneri  on this set), and more.

alamosbasement/flickr

A yearly battle over how much of a raise to give K-12 schools is getting underway early at the statehouse this year.   

Rob Dillard

Sarai Tillinghast is encouraging minority students to become teachers in Des Moines. She shares moments from her own meaningful career to convince them to join the ranks. Here's the story of the project known as Dream to Teach.

Rob Dillard

It’s time for Arabic class at Central Academy on the west edge of downtown Des Moines. Today’s lesson: naming the seasons of the year.

Rob Dillard

Two young Central Iowans have been helping to fund schools in Kenya since they were teenagers. Hopeful Africa started as an after-school club is now a serious nonprofit.

Marie/flickr

Schools around the state are keeping a close eye on first graders’ reading skills.

Rob Dillard

An Ankeny couple is making two major gifts to support projects in their hometown. The money from Dennis and Susan Albaugh will be split between Des Moines Area Community College and the Ankeny School District.

Joanne Johnson/flickr

A pilot program to beef up Iowa teacher preparation is underway.

Julie Englander / Iowa Public Radio

Local animal shelters and rescues are filled with unwanted pets, and for a long time vets and shelters discouraged people from giving animals as gifts. 

Bart & Co

Education for low-income children in Des Moines is receiving more than $1.1 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

michelec317

Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin says he wants states that increase funding to higher education to receive matching federal grants.

Amy Mayer

The Iowa Board of Regents is freezing tuition for in-state undergraduate students for the third year in a row.

Regents President Bruce Rastetter says it’s the first time in state history resident tuition has remained the same over this long a period.

Rastetter deflects concerns the freeze will mean much higher tuition in the future.

“The critical component to avoid that is the universities becoming more efficient, which they are, and then legislative state support,” he says.

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