climate change

Iowa Public Radio / Sarah Boden

Democratic State Sen. Rob Hogg of Cedar Rapids kicked off his campaign for U.S. Senate at a city park in Callender Tuesday morning.

Hogg hopes to challenge Sen. Chuck Grassley. The Republican is seeking his seventh term in the Senate. 

It was a low key event. Hogg spoke to about a half dozen people and described himself as an “underdog.”

Don Graham / Flickr, Licensed Under Creative Commons

President Obama unveiled his Clean Power Plan this week. The plan sets the first-ever EPA standards on power plant emissions and requires a 32% reduction in those emissions over the next 15 years. It also seeks to boost renewable energy sources.

2016 Republican presidential hopefuls reacted negatively to the plan. Florida Senator Marco Rubio called it "catastrophic," while former Florida Governor Jeb Bush described it as "irresponsible and over-reaching." New Jersey Governor Chris Christie called it an example of "overregulation" that would "kill American businesses and jobs."

Sarah Boden / Iowa Public Radio

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton says none of the emails she sent or received using her private server while Secretary of State  were marked “classified” at the time. Clinton told a gathering at the 3rd Congressional District Democratic Central Committee in Winterset on Saturday that she has “no idea” what the emails contained.

On Thursday, Inspector General Charles McCullough said four emails contained classified information, though they were not marked as such. 

USDA photo by Darin Leach / U.S. Department of Agriculture

The Earth has been through many changes. We can see the evidence when we study the geological record, but looking ahead is harder.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe explores the science of predicting climate change.  What do we know about the future of our planet, and how can we prepare for what is to come?

Flickr / Sanofi Pasteur

Climate change is real and humans are contributing to the greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere; that’s according to the fifth annual Iowa Climate Statement released Monday.

The statement contains signatures of 188 faculty and researchers from 39 Iowa colleges and universities. It warns that Iowans are experiencing negative health effects due to greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere.

reynermedia / Flickr

Evangelical Protestants are more likely than any other religious group to be climate change skeptics, according to a November 2014 report from the Public Religion Research Institute. But one Evangelical Christian disagrees. 

Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist and the director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University. She says it's frustrating that people see religion and climate science as mutually exclusive.

Amy Mayer/IPR file photo

Climate change could double losses to crops and property by the year 2100 according to a recent report from the non-partisan Government Accountability Office. 

Eric Kort, Creative Commons 2.0 / NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

One of the nation's best-known climate scientists is joining a lawsuit against the government to pressure for policies to address global warming.

anothertom / Flickr

180 scientists from  38 Iowa colleges and universities signed this year’s Iowa Climate Statement 2014. Co-author Peter Thorne says this year’s report focuses on climate change’s effect on Iowans’ health.

Iowa's Rising Waters

Jul 8, 2014
Amy Mayer / Iowa Public Radio

Iowa’s rivers and reservoirs have not reached flood stages of 1993 or 2008, but many communities are still dealing with significant flooding.

John Pemble / IPR

  National leaders, governors, mayors and tribal leaders met in Des Moines this week for a task force meeting that will make recommendations to the White House this fall. IPR's Clay Masters talked with Des Moines Mayor Frank Cownie about what those recommendations might look like. / Flickr Creative Commons

As the Ukrainian crisis deepens, Host Ben Kieffer talks with Wayne Moyer of Grinnell College and Donna Hoffman of University of Northern Iowa about U.S. response.  Other topics include, the Pulitzer Prize awarded to the Washington Post and the Guardian for their coverage of the NSA, a new climate change study, and Stephen Colbert's new Late Night gig.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media file photo

Food doesn’t just come from a grocery store. Millions of farmers spend their lives producing the crops and raising the livestock that we eat and use.

So it makes sense: If you’re interested in what’s on your plate, you’re interested in what’s going on in the field.

With that in mind, here are four things you should know about today’s food system:

The new farm bill became law in February

Durrie Bouscaren / IPR

In the period between 2008 and 2012, Iowa experienced a record amount of flooding and variability in rainfall, leading to damage that cost the state billions. Today on River to River, host Ben Kieffer asks how climate change is impacting extreme weather patterns, the economic impact, and, how we in Iowa can best prepare for the years to come.

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Chasing Ice

Mar 6, 2013
Manchester Friends of the Earth /flickr

Melting glaciers and receding ice caps are often cited as evidence of climate change. Today on Talk of Iowa, we talk with a filmmaker who set out to show the world this physical evidence of climate change.  We’ll also talk climate science with Iowa scientists who are studying how our earth is changing.

ninadangelo / flickr

We know that climate change is dramatically and adversely affecting habitats of many endangered species, but it is also skewing the male-to-female ratio of certain animals. Today on River to River, we talk with two Iowa State researchers who study how climate change may halt the sexual reproduction of turtles, lizards and fish due to a lack of males.

Also, we sit down with Chris Brochu, an Associate Professor of Geology at University of Iowa to discuss recent research on the death of the dinosaurs that is making waves in paleontology.

John Pemble / IPR

When Veterans return from active duty, transitioning back to civilian life is challenging. Team Rubicon puts veterans back on the front lines, responding to disaster, and renewing their sense of purpose.

Today on "River to River" we speak with the founders of Team Rubicon, Jacob Wood and William McNulty. They will be at Grinnell College next week to receive the $100,000 Grinnell Prize.

We'll also talk to Regional EPA administrator Karl Brooks. We'll ask him about the President's renewed focus on climate change in his recent State of the Union address.

The End of the World

Feb 14, 2013
Emily Lakdawalla, Planetary Society Blogger / flickr

How will the world end and what can we do to prevent it? "River to River" talks with Paul Wapner, an expert in global environmental politics about the human suffering extreme climate change continues to cause.

Also University of Iowa astrophysicist Steve Spangler joins us to discuss the asteroid that will be whizzing by Earth—at a distance a bit too close for comfort—on Friday.  We’ll ask Spangler about the possibility of a massive asteroid destroying our planet in the near future.

Sarah McCammon / IPR

Over the past several months, we’ve been reporting on lots of problems caused by a lack of rain. And for good reason – the historic drought plaguing Iowa and much of the nation has dried up crops, destroyed landscaping, and killed off fish.

But like with most things, there can be a silver lining.

John Larson makes wine at Snus Hill Winery in Madrid, Iowa. This time of year, he’s not growing grapes – but he is mixing wine in giant, silver tanks.

Fernando Tomás / Wikimedia Commons

There has been a lot of talk about climate change in the news, with some experts saying super storms like Hurricane Sandy could be more frequent on the East Coast. But what’s the future of climate change in the Midwest? Ben Kieffer talks with University of Iowa Environmental Engineer Jerry Schnoor and others about what we might expect in the Midwest and how we might adapt to the change. Then, Ben talks with state Senator Rob Hogg, a vocal supporter of climate change policies.

Iowa State University

Farmers are already making changes to adjust to global warming. A researcher from Iowa State University meets with agriculture officials, including USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack, in Washington, D.C. Thursday.  ISU Climate Science Program Director Dr. Gene Takle is briefing Vilsack and other officials on how to prepare and plan for global warming.  He says climate change actually has some benefits for farmers, at least in the short-term. But he the greatest risk for the industry is unpredictability and wild fluctuations in weather patterns.