Campaigns

todd prichard
Katarina Sostaric / IPR

Iowa Rep. Todd Prichard of Charles City announced Tuesday he is seeking the Democratic nomination for governor.

Prichard is a veteran and a lawyer. He says he wants to help "forgotten Iowans" by offering free community college to all Iowans, expanding access to health care and raising wages.

Prichard says he can appeal to urban and rural voters because he grew up in Davenport and now lives in a small town.

Amy Mayer/IPR

For 10 years a program from Iowa State University has helped prepare first-time candidates to run for political office. It’s held during odd years and this year’s program has attracted a record number of participants.

Three day-long programs in Ames are offering tips and tools for running a campaign and getting elected, from fundraising and campaign finance rules to communication strategies and social media.

Clay Masters/IPR file photo

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is vowing to move aggressively in controlling gun violence.  And, in a campaign stop in Davenport today, she took a swipe at a comment Republican Jeb Bush made last week after the shootings at a community college in Oregon.

“We can’t tolerate that,” she said, “this doesn’t just happen, this isn’t stuff that happens.  We let it happen and we have to act against those people who should not have guns in the first place.”

Joyce Russell/IPR

Florida senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio drew an early-morning crowd at the Westside Conservative Club in Urbandale, a popular stop for candidates.    

More than 200 turned out for breakfast at the Machine Shed Restaurant to hear the 44-year-old son of Cuban immigrants who’s on a three-day tour of the state.

Rubio’s stump speech included strengthening the economy, reforming higher education, and asserting American leadership abroad. Rubio promised to reform entitlement programs and confront aggression abroad in Russia, China and the Middle East.

Young for Iowa

The last round of primary elections until August was held on Tuesday.  Most of the matchups for the November midterm elections are set, including Iowa's contests.  In a surprise victory this weekend, delegates to the third district Republican convention, chose David Young, former Chief of Staff for Senator Charles Grassley, as their nominee.  That despite his fifth place finish in June 3rd voting.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with Tim Hagle, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Iowa and Chris Larimer, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Northern Iowa ab

Who Decides? A Third Congressional District Convention Primer

Jun 6, 2014

For the first time since 2002, the GOP nominee in Iowa's third congressional district will be decided by convention.  Host Ben Kieffer talks with former Iowa House Speaker Brent Siegrist.  He was one of the candidates vying for the republican nomination in the 2002 primary.  After three ballots, and a close vote convention delegates chose then State Senator Steve King.

Joyce Russell / IPR

After pulling ahead late in a crowded field, State Senator Joni Ernst won the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate  to replace retiring Democrat Tom Harkin.    

Julia Taylor

U.S. Senate - Rep

Sam Clovis

Joni Ernst ✔

Mark Jacobs

Scott Schaben

Matt Whitaker

U.S. House. Dist. 1 - Dem

Swati Dandekar

Anesa Kajtazovic

Pat Murphy ✔

Dave O'Brien 

Monica Vernon

2014 Voter Guide

Jun 3, 2014
Vox Efx / flickr

In an effort to provide voters with information about the candidates in the 2014 primary elections, Iowa Public Radio staff contacted the Democratic and Republican candidates competing in Iowa’s open congressional races. 

USA.gov

On Tuesday, six states held nominating contests and the Republican establishment scored big wins. Are the results a bellwether for Iowa’s primaries in less than two weeks?  Political analysts Dennis Goldford of Drake University and Tim Hagle of the University of Iowa give us their thoughts on the primaries for open congressional seats here in Iowa.  Host Ben Kieffer asks how the issues of minimum wage and the Affordable Care Act are being talked about by Iowa's GOP candidates for U.S. Senate.
 

Candidate facebook profile photos

More than a year ago, the 2014 mid-term election looked like a sleepy one in Iowa. But a U.S. Senate seat and two congressional districts are up for grabs without incumbents. With the primary election a little more than two weeks away, IPR's Clay Masters takes a look at the open races. Iowa's first congressional district is in northeast Iowa and includes the cities of Cedar Rapids and Waterloo. Democratic Congressman Bruce Braley is leaving his seat to run for Tom Harkin’s U.S. Senate seat.

USA.gov

Iowa's June primary election is heating up.  Republican senatorial candidates have been debating, buying ads, and collecting big name endorsements.  But, only one will be campaigning to take incumbent Democrat Tom Harkin's seat.  Host Dean Borg talks with Kathie Obradovich, Political Columnist for the Des Moines Register and Tim Hagle, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Iowa about Iowa's primary races for Congress and U.S.

Some Iowa Republicans in the business world  are criticizing their party’s 4th district Congressman Steve King for his role in the federal government shutdown.   But  even before the showdown  in Washington, there was talk of mounting a primary challenge against the six-term incumbent.    

Recent polls indicate freshman Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is a favorite among GOP hopefuls for the White House in 2016.  Paul is coming to Iowa later this week to speak at the Republican Party of Iowa's "Lincoln Dinner."  Host Ben Kieffer gets his views on immigration reform, drones, and bridging the warring factions within the GOP.  Then, he gets analysis from Bruce Gronbeck, Emeritus Professor of Communication Studies at University of Iowa.

Capitol Steps: Politics Takes A Holiday

Jan 1, 2013

Though 2012 is gone, relive the most memorable political moments with comedy group Capitol Steps. In their one-hour year-in-review special, awards will be distributed to the great political gaffes and mishaps of the past year.

Stephen Cummings / Flickr

Iowa holds the coveted first in the nation contest to decide who will be nominated for President. But, how secure is the future of the Iowa caucuses? Ben Kieffer talks with David Yepsen of the Paul Simon Institute and JoDee Winterhof, who helped lead Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, about how Iowa can keep its leadoff spot. Then, an Iowa State University researcher is causing courts to rethink eyewitness testimony in criminal cases.

NPR

CNN’s Chief Political Correspondent Candy Crowley made history just before the election, when she became only the second woman to moderate a presidential debate.

Crowley visited Iowa State University Tuesday night to discuss the results of the 2012 election.

And she spoke with Iowa Public Radio’s Sarah McCammon by phone. Sarah began by asking Crowley what stands out to her from the 2012 campaign.

Watching the debate in Iowa

Oct 23, 2012
Sandhya Dirks

Both Governor Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama took the stage for their final debate in Florida last night. In Iowa, the campaigns staged watch parties. Iowa Public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks reports that both camps believe their candidate went home with the win.  

Clay Masters / IPR

Both President Obama and Governor Mitt Romney will make campaign stops Wednesday in eastern Iowa. Recent polls show the race is still up in the air. Romney has a solid hold on rural counties here. But in a state that’s population is shifting from rural to urban, the candidates will have to take the suburbs to win. Iowa Public Radio's Clay Masters reports.

Photos: Clay Masters

There’s a joke going around among journalists: This presidential debate is the most important one since the last one, or until the next one. Host Ben Kieffer talks with analysts Dave Peterson from Iowa State University and Bruce Gronbeck emeritus professor from the University of Iowa, to give their take on the latest face off, and how  it impacts the presidential race.

 

Sarah McCammon / Iowa Public Radio

Living in a swing state means never-ending TV ads, lots of attention from the candidates, and dozens of campaign offices spread all over your state. 

But all that spending isn’t exactly trickling down to small businesses in local communities.

Instead, most of the spending goes to TV ads.

DonkeyHotey / Flickr

The first presidential debate kicks off this evening and many voters across the nation will tune in to hear what President Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney will discuss. Our political experts talk about the expectations they have for the candidates and listeners say what they want to hear from each candidate.

Sandhya Dirks

The first presidential debate is this week, and the presidential candidates are a little busy. So are the Vice Presidential Candidates. Paul Ryan just concluded a two day tour stumping up and down the Mississippi River, talking about the economy. To find out whether his message hit home, Iowa Public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks talked to voters.

European Parliament / flickr

In an election cycle where many top policy concerns are labeled “women’s issues,” about three-quarters of newspapers’ presidential coverage is written by men according to recent survey data by the Fourth Estate Project. River to River hosts a panel of women journalists from news outlets across the state to find out why this is, and what its impact could be on the upcoming presidential election.

The vice presidential race takes the reigns in Iowa

Sep 19, 2012

This week the race for Iowa’s six electoral votes is in the hands of the Vice Presidential candidates. Iowa Public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks attended rallies by both Republican Congressman Paul Ryan and Democratic Vice President Joe Biden.

Although they were in different parts of the state you would have thought the two vice presidential candidates were debating in the same room. Vice President Joe Biden welcomed his opponent, "the good thing about Romney picking Ryan, is that Romney’s vague promises have now been given definition."
 

Sandhya Dirks

Despite a devastating drought Iowa has weathered a rough economy thanks to its agricultural base. On Wednesday night Ag leaders from across the country gathered in Des Moines for a forum on agriculture. The question up for debate? Which presidential candidate is best for farmers.  As Iowa Public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks reports, the answer to that question could decide the election.  

AP Photos

It’s the day after the conventions—do you know where you candidate is? If you guessed Iowa, you would be right. While President Obama stops at the University of Iowa, Republican Nominee Mitt Romney stumped at Northwestern College – a private Christian school. As Iowa Public Radio’s Sandhya Dirks reports, Romney rallied the Republican base and tried to woo the youth vote.  

Ryan and Obama Woo Voters at State Fair

Aug 14, 2012
Obama campaign Facebook page

The state of Iowa – and the Iowa State Fair— once again became the center of the political Universe this week.  Two skinny politicians from bordering Midwestern states stopped by the fair to try and drum up support for their respective campaigns—and along the way they threw a few punches. In the ring for the Republicans was the newly announced pick for vice president — Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI). Stopping by in the evening for a beer and a pork chop? President Barack Obama.

Most incumbents in the Iowa legislature have held on to their jobs for now  following yesterday’s primary voting.   Iowa Public Radio’s Joyce Russell reports .

All eyes are on Texas, but attention will soon turn to Iowa's primary elections and the efforts to recall a sitting Governor in Wisconsin.  Host Ben Kieffer will analyze results and look ahead for signs of what's to come with Drake University Political Scientist Dennis Goldford and University of Iowa Professor Emeritus of Communications Bruce Gronbeck.