Books and Authors

Emily Woodbury / Iowa Public Radio

A clerihew is a four-line biographical poem invented by Edward Clerihew Bentley. Paul Ingram, who buys books for Prairie Lights Book Store in Iowa City, says he’s been writing them down for years “when they come to him.”

You know Paul Ingram, Prairie Lights is his Kingdom, Where the lost shopper stands While Paul talks with his hands - Charity Nebbe

He’s just published many of those in his first book “The Lost Clerihews of Paul Ingram.” He talks with Charity Nebbe during this Talk of Iowa interview about clerihew as a form of verse and also shares some of his favorites. 

  Romance novels are now the top-performing category on the best-seller lists, generating nearly $1.5 billion dollars in profits for the publishing industry each year.   Almost every state has a Romance Writers of American chapter, including Iowa.  

Wikimedia Commons

Summer brings with it many pleasures, and if you’re lucky one of those is the time to dig into a great book.  During this hour on Talk of Iowa, Jan Weismiller and Paul Ingram of Prairie Lights Book Store in Iowa City and Annie Leonard of The Next Chapter in Knoxville join host Charity Nebbe. 

FICTION:

 My Name is Resolute by Nancy E. Turner

Norwegian by Night by Derek E. Miller

Katherine Perkins / IPR

Pie.  Everyone loves to eat it, but when it comes to making it a lot of us would rather leave that to the professionals.

Iowa City writer Larry Baker had a block-buster hit with "The Flamingo Rising," in 1997.  But publishing has changed since then, and in his subsequent novels, Larry has searched for some innovative ways to get his books widely distributed.  With his new novel, "The Education of Nancy Adams," he's once again chosen North Liberty's Ice Cube Press, with an early limited release just in Iowa in April and May and an initial run of only 200 hardcover editions printed (and only available as an e-book on Amazon).  Larry talks to Charity about his new book and how was inspired by "The Education of H

On Being / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode

What do dwarfs, prodigies, and deaf people have in common?

"In a curious way, differences that seem so isolating are actually what unites us and the thing we have most in common."

Keturah Stickann

False death reports, spaghetti growing on trees, and more than one discovery of evidence that proves that a mythical creature is real… we’ve all learned to be a little skeptical on April 1st.

Today on April Fool's day - the art of the prank.

Host Charity Nebbe explores our rich history of hoaxes and practical jokes with Kembrew McLeod, author of Pranksters and University of Iowa Associate Professor of Communication Studies. She also sits down with Leo Landis, from the State Historical Museum of Iowa, to discuss Iowa's role in the hoax of the Cardiff Giant.

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

Hear the remarkable story of a the man behind paperback publisher Grove Press, and how he and the books he published fit into the culture of the 1960s.  Dennis Reese hosts this talk with Loren Glass about his new book, Counterculture Colophon: Grove Press, the Evergreen Review, and the Incorporation of the Avant-Garde.

World Bank Photo Collection / flickr

Jane Goodall is famous for her groundbreaking observation of wild chimpanzees; but for the last 30 years, she’s devoted most of her time to traveling the world, telling her stories, and trying to fan the flames of an environmental movement that could save her beloved chimpanzees and so many other species from extinction.

Eric Kilby

Increasingly recognized as "the next Jane Goodall" in primatology circles, Iowa State University primatologist Jill Pruetz brings incredible research and stories back to Iowa from Senegal in western Africa, where she studies the lives of savanna chimpanzees.

The Moth

The Moth Radio Hour has captured the hearts of public radio listeners, but before those “true stories told live” make it to the radio they are told on a stage somewhere in the United States. This Friday that stage is the Iowa City's Englert Theatre.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Maggie Cino, director of The Moth, and the host of Friday’s event Peter Aguero.  

F.A. Rinehart

There is a short list of World’s Fairs that have inspired many stories, New York 1939, Chicago 1893, St. Louis 1904.  The 1898 Omaha World’s Fair is not one of them… until now. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with author Timothy Shaffert about his latest novel The Swan Gondola which takes place on the eve of the Omaha World’s Fair.

Joseph Geha

The novel Lebanese Blonde transports readers to Little Syria, a neighborhood in Toledo, Ohio that is populated by immigrants and first generation Arab Americans. In his first novel, short story writer Joseph Geha shows us our world as it is seen through the eyes of people who came here looking for new opportunities for a new life.

The original broadcast of this interview aired on February 4, 2013

Fern Kupfer’s latest book is a memoir that transports readers to Long Island in the 1950s. Charity Nebbe talks with the Ames author as she reflects on past experiences in her life, including the period she discovered she was BRCA positive, a genetic marker for cancer.

whitneyinchicago

Cupcakes have taken the U.S. by storm in the last few years; but cakes, large and small, have always been an important part of our culture.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses family recipes and gourmet innovation with Evelyn Birkby, Iowa’s most famous homemaker and columnist for the Shenandoah Evening Sentinel.

"A Christmas Carol," read by Doug Brown

Dec 24, 2013
Heritage Auction Gallery

Beloved by Iowa Public Radio listeners for decades, the late WOI classical music host Doug Brown reads the entirety of the ultimate Christmas classic, “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens.

Morehouse College

At 10AM, hear this year's "Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols" live from King's College, Cambridge on IPR Classical. Then, at 11 AM, the Tallis Scholars - celebrating their 40th anniversary - present a beautiful concert from Boston. At noon, hear this year's Christmas at Luther, recorded in Decorah. But wait, there's more!

Per Palmkvist Knudsen

All our lives we are taught to strive for things like success or wealth, but research shows that cultivating an attitude of gratitude daily can change your life.  James Autry and his wife, Former Iowa Lt. Gov. Sally Pederson have co-authored the new book “Choosing Gratitude 365 Days a Year.”  They sit down with host Charity Nebbe to discuss meditations on gratitude.

Mitch Albom

Dec 3, 2013

What happens to us after we die?  That’s a question many of us ponder.  The characters in Mitch Albom’s novels often have unusual insight into the answer.  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Albom about his most recent novel, The First Phone Call from Heaven.  

Candlewick Press

George Bernard Shaw said, “Make it a rule never to give a child a book you would not read yourself.”  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Annie Leonard of The Next Chapter in Knoxville, Sue Davis of River Lights Bookstore in Dubuque and Jerri Heid of the Ames Public Library about the year's best books to be enjoyed by the young and the young at heart.  You can find the full list below.

Picture Books

Digger, Dozer, Dumper by Hope Vestergaard, Illustrated by David Slonim - "Lots of cute poems and great pictures." - Annie Leonard

Casey Fleser / Flickr

Garrison Keillor once said, “A book is a gift you can open again and again.”  Host Charity Nebbe talks with Jan Weismiller and Paul Ingram of Prairie Lights bookstore in Iowa City, and Mollie Loughlin of The Book Vine in Cherokee about the best books to give as gifts this year.  We've compiled the list below, along with what our reviewers had to say about each book.

Paul Ingram - Fiction

Bart Teeuwisse

Margaret Atwood has published more than 40 books, achieved critical and commercial success, and touched millions of lives. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Atwood about her latest book, MaddAddam. They also discuss her work, evolution, extinction, her dislike for the term science fiction, and her love of twitter.

Durrie Bouscaren / Iowa Public Radio

James Yee spent nearly a year as a military chaplain at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. He was appalled by the conditions he saw there, including what he describes as humiliating interrogation methods which he says often targeted prisoners' religion.

On his way home in 2003, Yee was detained by the U.S. military and accused of spying. He was held in solitary confinement for 76 days before ultimately being released, cleared of all charges, and honorably discharged.

University of Iowa Press

On a cold February night in 1897, the general store in Walford, Iowa burned to the ground.  The next morning townspeople found charred remains believed to be those of proprietor Frank Novak.  That was, until a local laborer turned up missing.  That discovery launched an investigation and cross-country manhunt.  Host Ben Kieffer gets the gruesome story from author Peter Kaufman.  It's the basis of his book Skull in the Ashes published by University of Iowa Press.

Michael Wellman

The world of publishing has changed dramatically in the past decade.  Charity Nebbe discusses Iowa's commercial publishing industry through the lens of a university press, a small press and a self-publishing author

Ronald van Holst

In her best-selling novels, Amy Tan has explored mother-daughter relationships that resonate across all cultures. In her latest novel, The Valley of Amazement, she does it again. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Tan about her latest novel, the photo that inspired it, and writing her very first sex scenes.

Amy Tan is part of this year's AViD Author Series, sponsored by the Des Moines Public Library Foundation. She will be in Des Moines on Sunday, November 10 at 3:00 PM at the Hoyt Sherman Place Theater.

Turn Here Sweet Corn

Oct 21, 2013
Univeristy of Minnesota

Through high winds and hail, dry years and wet, and through the pressures of development and corporate interests Atina Diffley and her husband Martin ran one of the first certified organic produce farms in the Midwest.

Diffley has written about her farm and her life in the book, "Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works."

Courtesy of Snyder family

Don Snyder never got to know his mother. She died just sixteen days after he and his twin brother were born in 1950. The truth about her death remained a secret for decades. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Don about discovering his mother’s secret and what he hopes to accomplish by telling her story.

Mark Hirsch

"That Tree" is a lonely Bur oak standing in the middle of a cornfield in Southwest Wisconsin. That Tree is a tree that sparked the imagination of photographer Mark Hirsch. Today on Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Hirsch about what drew him to That Tree and his year long odyssey, taking a picture of the tree every day for a year… and the stunning results.

According to Kate Christensen, she has spent much of her life as, “a hungry, lonely, wild animal looking for happiness and stability.”  In her new memoir “Blue Plate Special" she writes about her life and the food she turned to for comfort as well as sustenance.  Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Christensen about her memoir and life as a writer.

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