Board of Regents

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The Iowa Board of Regents hopes to persuade Iowa legislators to substantially increase state appropriations to the three state universities, but is developing its own plan for halting what regents contend is underfunding.

Referring to the Legislature, Regent Larry McKibben, a former state senator now heading a regents committee on tuition said, “I’m not going to sit around and worry about what they’re going to do in January. I’m going to lead a project that makes change.”  McKibben says he considers the current regents board a “change agent.”  He said he doesn’t know the outcome.

bruce harreld
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The University of Iowa is proposing a 7.08 percent tuition increase in each of the next five years. The school presented its plan Monday to the Board of Regents’ Tuition Task Force.

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Iowa State University’s enrollment has escalated since 2009, while the state’s appropriation to the school has plunged. That’s the message interim President Ben Allen presented to the Board of Regents tuition task force today in Ames.

University of Northern Iowa photo

In the first of three meetings to be held this month by Iowa’s Regents institutions, University of Northern Iowa President Mark Nook Monday unveiled UNI’s five year tuition plan. Nook told a group of about 50 people on the UNI campus that in order to attract and retain students, any increases must be reasonable and predictable.

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Robert Donley, Executive Director for Iowa’s Board of Regents during the past nine years, says he’s leaving the state university system facing major financing challenges.

Donley lists "predictable and appropriate funding" as the major challenge.

michael richards
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Iowa's Board of Regents will allow public comments at its regular meetings starting next month. 

The first opportunity for public comment will be at the regents' June 8 meeting in Cedar Falls. That is when the board is scheduled to take a final vote on tuition increases for the upcoming school year.

Regent Michael Richards directed staff to develop a "pilot program" for taking public comment when he was elected board president earlier this month.

university of iowa
Vladimir Kulikov / Wikimedia Commons

The Iowa Board of Regents heard from university and student leaders Monday in the first of two meetings to consider additional tuition hikes at the state’s public universities. 

The regents are proposing raising undergraduate tuition by a total of $358 for the next school year. 

At the University of Iowa, the total increase for nonresident students would be $1,764. 

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Iowa’s Board of Regents has elected Dr. Michael Richards as the new board president.  He’s a 1970 University of Iowa Medical School graduate now living in West Des Moines.

Richards is a physician and former Unity Point health care executive. He was appointed to the board a year ago this month.  Richards lists setting tuition and getting a new president at Iowa State as the most immediate issues. 

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Amy Mayer/IPR

Outgoing Iowa Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter says the state's public universities need to raise tuition for the upcoming school year.

He says he asked the board office to work with the universities on an additional tuition increase to make up for cuts in state funding. The increase would come on top of a two percent hike previously approved for this fall. 

Rastetter says state budget cuts for the current and next fiscal year make tuition hikes necessary.

Iowa State University

Iowa’s Board of Regents is selecting a former Iowa State University administrator to return as interim president.  The Regents are meeting Monday to name Ben Allen interim president.

Allen served four years as ISU’s provost before the Regents appointed him president of University of Northern Iowa in 2006.  He led that campus until retiring in 2013.

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Three nominees for the Iowa Board of Regents faced questioning from the Iowa Senate Education Committee, as Senators mull whether to confirm Governor Branstad’s choices for six-year terms on the board.

The nominees are former Republican State Senator Nancy Boettger of Harlan and former Democratic State Representative Nancy Dunkel of Dyersville.

Branstad reappointed Regent Sherry Bates, who has served only a partial term on the board.

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The newest member of the Iowa Board of Regents, who faces confirmation by the Iowa Senate, took an hour of vigorous questioning Monday from Democrats on the Senate Education Committee.  

Dr. Michael Richards has been serving on the board in an interim capacity, replacing retiring Regent Mary Andringa.     

Minority Democrats probed Richards’s views on conservative legislation under consideration in the GOP- controlled Senate, which would affect the universities.    

John Pemble/IPR file photo

Iowa Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter says he will not seek reappointment when his term expires at the end of April.  Rastetter has been on the board that governs the state’s public universities since 2011.  He was elected president in 2013.  In an interview on Iowa Public TV’s Iowa Press two weeks ago, Rastetter called his time on the board a “unique and challenging experience.”

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The Iowa Board of Regents has authorized an extensive audit of  the use of ISU-owned aircraft.  The board opened its meeting in Cedar Falls today by receiving a preliminary audit report of the three state universities’ travel policies. 

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Fall enrollment at Iowa State University’s is up 1.9 percent over last fall’s record.  With 36,660 students this year, ISU is again the largest of the state’s three public universities. 

The University of Iowa is reporting enrollment of 33,334 this fall, also up from last year’s figure. 

At the University of Northern Iowa, total enrollment for the fall semester at 11,905 -- 95 short of its goal of 12,000 students.  This includes 2,000 freshmen, the largest UNI freshman class since 2008.

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Joyce Russell/IPR

Governor Branstad is urging the administrators who oversee spending for Iowa’s Regents universities to keep a close eye on their budgets, after reports of large salaries at the Regents administrative offices.   

Due to the salary for the board’s executive director and other expenses, over $3.5 million will come from the universities themselves to keep the board office running.   

Branstad says the cost of running the board should stay as reasonable as possible.

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Regents President Bruce Rastetter says the board wants the universities to develop two-year budgets, hoping the Iowa legislators will reciprocate with more appropriation predictability. “And that’s what we’ve asked the universities to think about in terms of their needs so we can be more forward looking for parents and their students on what tuition may look like over the course of two and three years out rather than just year by year,” he said. Rastetter also said Iowa State President Steven Leath and Iowa’s Bruce Herrald asked that their salaries not be increased, so the Regents postponed

Board of Regents photo

A member of the Iowa Board of Regents is resigning after just one year on the board.  Mary Andringa says she underestimated the time required to fully serve in the role given her other commitments and responsibilities.  Andringa is the Chair of the Board for the Vermeer Corporation in Pella, and a former CEO of that company.  She also serves on a number of other boards.

Andringa has been on the Board of Regents since last May.  Her resignation is effective Saturday. 

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Budget writers at the capitol have found a way to squeeze a few million dollars out of the education budget, in order to boost appropriations for the Regents universities. 

Even so, education advocates are calling funding for the schools woefully inadequate. 

Under the budget that now goes to the full House for debate, funding for the three universities will go up by a total of about $6 million, less than a third of their request. 

That amounts to a raise of less than one percent for the University of Iowa and one-point-two percent for Iowa State.

A member of Iowa’s Board of Regents says Johnson County’s raising of the minimum wage is “out of step with the rest of Iowa”.

Johnson County is incrementally raising the wages to at least $10.10 an hour by 2017, action taken by the County Board of Supervisors.

At today’s Regents meeting in Ames, Regent Larry McKibben of Marshalltown said he’ll oppose extending that to the University of Iowa campus.

“I’m working hard to reduce debt of families and children, and we can’t be an outlier vis-a-vis the other two universities, and I want an answer to that,” he said.

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The head of education spending in the Iowa Senate has dim hopes for increased funding for the state universities next year, and he predicts the Regents will not be able to freeze tuition.    

Governor Branstad’s budget includes 8 million new dollars for the universities, with the Board of Regents deciding how to divide it up among the three schools.    

But Arlington Democrat Brian Schoenjahn says that should be the legislature’s job.

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Amy Mayer/IPR

The president of Iowa’s Board of Regents is predicting policy changes that will further limit the manner in which contracts are awarded by the three state universities. Bruce Rastetter's comments come after Iowa State University and the University of Iowa both awarded contracts to individuals with Republican ties without taking bids on the work. 

Rastetter says that the individuals getting the state work are capable and qualified, but without taking bids on the work, "the optics are not pretty." 

Tuition is going up next semester at Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa, but remains frozen at the University of Iowa.

The state Board of Regents has voted to hike tuition by three percent on the Ames and Cedar Falls campuses. 

The vote came after Iowa State and UNI student leaders from those campuses supported the tuition increase.  But, UI student body president Liz Mills said the mid-year tuition increase would shock some student budgets.

That resonated with Regent Patricia Cownie of Des Moines.

Iowa State University President Steven Leath is receiving a five-percent pay increase, boosting his annual salary to $525, 000.

At its meeting in Ames, the State Board of Regents also extended Leath’s Iowa State appointment to 2020. 

During that five-years, Leath also will receive an extra $125,000 in deferred compensation,.

The Regents also approved boosting University of Northern Iowa President William Ruud’s pay by two-and-one-half-percent. He’ll now be paid $348,000 annually, with an extra $75,000  in deferred compensation through 2017.

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Iowa House and Senate leaders are expressing optimism that a proposed budget for higher education will be enough to fund a tuition freeze at the Regents universities for the third year in a row.   But a Regents spokesman declined to comment on the effect on university budgets until full details are released. 

 Democratic Senate Majority Leader Mike Gronstal says a tentative budget deal worked out last week includes a one-point-two-five percent increase for the Regents schools.

Photo by John Pemble/IPR

A Republican-dominated committee in the Iowa House has approved a controversial Board of Regents plan to give more money to state universities that attract more Iowa students.

It’s called performance-based funding.   

But the panel approved no money to soften the blow for the University of Iowa. 

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Iowa’s Board of Regents has released the names of a 21-person search committee that’ll be recommending candidates to be the University of Iowa’s next president.

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Iowa state senators today questioned Greene County social worker Sherry Bates, Governor Branstad’s nominee to the Iowa Board of Regents.

Cedar Rapids Democrat Liz Mathis did not vote to send Bates’s nomination to the full Senate, saying she wants more information about the nominee. Mathis says there’s some concern that Bates is registered as an independent on the state’s voter rolls, instead of Republican or Democrat.

John Pemble/IPR file photo

Board of Regents President Bruce Rastetter denies that there’s a political agenda behind a new proposed funding formula for Iowa's three state universities.

John Pemble/IPR

The AIB College of Business announced new details today about the gifting of its 20-acre Des Moines campus to the University of Iowa.  

The campus will be renamed the Regional Regents Center. It's located two miles from the Des Moines airport and is comprised of 17 buildings, including apartment-style student housing. 

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