Arts and Culture

Arts and culture

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Chris Clayson

The laws, morals, and ethics which guide us, can also confuse us, and sometimes challenge us to improve or change the rules.

In this edition of Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe gets a look at the philosophy of rules with Scott Samuelson, a philosophy professor at Kirkwood Community College. He says that he's learned a lesson stemming from the life of Socrates that for the most part, rules are important to follow, and when they need to change, then sometimes civil disobedience is that way that is done.

Gage Skidmore

The movie Black Panther features a cast full of strong black characters, both male and female. Its release is a powerful moment for many people who have longed to see themselves and their culture reflected on screen.

“I never saw that [growing up],” says Noreen Naseem Rodriguez, an assistant professor of elementary social studies at Iowa State University. “It’s so important, especially as an educator, to provide those mirrors to children, to affirm them, to show them that you have different options in life.”

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Artiom Ponkratenko

The intersection of art and agriculture is important to Mary Swander. She says art has been a part of ag for a long time with concepts like folk art. Now she has helped start a new non-profit called AgArts.

She says that we are in a dilemma with issues involving pollution, erosion, decline of the family farm, decline of small towns, and the arts have a role in addressing those issues in a way that people can embrace and that helps with revitalization.

Rob Dillard / Iowa Public Radio

An opera opening in New York City this week will feature some voices from Iowa. But not all of the chorus members involved are free to travel to see the production in person.

“Give yourself a little inhale," says director Mary Cohen, as she stands before her choir. "Open your mouth for the exhale. This time reflect on the message of the song. So the message of freedom, light, hope.”

Black Violin / Wikimedia Commons

The genre bending classical hip-hop duo Black Violin is playing a show at the Gallagher Bluedorn Performing Arts Center in Cedar Falls on Wednesday, May 2. During this Talk of Iowa interview, Wil Baptiste, who plays viola for the duo, joins Charity Nebbe. 

Rooy Media

David James "DJ" Savarese is a poet, prose writer, and recent alumni of Oberlin College, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa with a double major in Anthropology and Creative Writing. He is also autistic and nonspeaking.

Clay / Iowa Public Radio

Kyle Munson’s last day as the Iowa Columnist at the Des Moines Register is Friday. He's worked there for 24 years. He's been the Iowa Columnist for the last 8 years. Munson is leaving for a job at Principal Financial. The first person to hold the job was reporting on World War II. Munson is just the fourth columnist to hold this position.

IPR's Clay Masters spoke with Munson about the state of journalism and the role of a columnist in the changing media landscape. 

Charity Nebbe / Iowa Public Radio

From pick-up games to organized leagues, every hometown team has its heroes. Hometown sports continue to shape and unite us in towns, cities, and states across the country.

In Mount Vernon, a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian’s "Museum on Main Street Program" is working to celebrate local sports heroes and the broader impact of athletics on our communities. “Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America” will be on display at the First Street Community Center from March 18 to April 29, 2018.

Drake University

An art professor at Drake University is a winner of the prestigious Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in the arts. He’s only the second Drake faculty member to receive the honor, and one of a few Iowans.     

Chicago-born printmaker Phillip Chen has been teaching at Drake since 1996. He is the only person currently living in Iowa on this year’s list of 173 Guggenheim Fellows. The recognition comes with an undisclosed financial reward, which Chen says he can use.

Ryan Clemens / IowaWatch

Have you ever felt like you have an alter ego? A version of yourself that is most authentic, but also most often hidden? On Thursday, March 29, an audience gathered in Iowa City for "Fringe: True Stories from Outsiders," an IowaWatch storytelling event, to explore what it means to share one's authentic self.

The University of Washington / http://depts.washington.edu/moving1/black_migration.shtml

The city of Waterloo has won more $47,500 in grant money to a study a historically black neighborhood

Hoyt Sherman Place

Hoyt Sherman Place in Des Moines is adding to its art collection a piece from circa 1600 that it has owned for nearly a century without knowing it. Officials have discovered “Apollo and Venus” by Dutch master Otto Van Veen.

Kate Payne

When the U.S. men’s team won Olympic gold in curling for the first time this year, people all over the country paid attention. Since the historic win a month ago, one curling club in Iowa says interest in the sport is exploding. 

Katherine Perkins/IPR

This program originally aired 9-19-16.

Just off of 2nd Avenue in Cedar Rapids sits an unassuming little carriage house. In a tiny studio apartment that used to be the hayloft, is where the most iconic American painting was created. Artist Grant Wood lived as well as worked in the space from 1924 - 1935, and he created all of his masterpieces there, including "American Gothic," "Young Corn," and "Woman with Plants."

Talk of Iowa host Charity Nebbe toured the studio with Katherine Kunau, associate curator of the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art.

Joyce Russell/IPR

Iowa Public Radio’s Bob Dorr was honored in the Iowa legislature today for his long career in music and broadcasting in Iowa.

The Iowa House and Senate passed resolutions praising Dorr as an Iowa icon, and thanking him for his dedication to the cultural landscape and history of the state.

Dorr’s broadcasting career spans 45 years.  His music shows began airing from Cedar Falls public radio station KUNI, and expanded when it became part of Iowa Public Radio, where his show still air.

Emily Woodbury

Motivated by the Me Too movement, FilmScene in Iowa City is hosting "Women's March," a month-long series celebrating films directed by women filmmakers. At an Animation Camp on March 15 and 16, young filmmakers - specifically girls and genderqueer youth ages 11 to 13 - learned to make their own animated films. 

On this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with FilmScene programming director Rebecca Fons about the motivation behind the animation camp as well as participants' experiences.

Iowa Puppets Take Center Stage

Mar 21, 2018
Eulenspiegel Puppet Theatre Company

Humans have been making, performing with, and enjoying puppets since the days of ancient Greece. In Iowa, this art form continues to thrive with a number of practicing puppeteers writing shows and giving performances throughout the state.

callesur.com

He is from Panama and she is from Columbia, they met in Iowa, and they are musical partners that make up the duo Calle Sur. In this Talk of Iowa, host Charity Nebbe talks with Karin Stein and Ed East. Stein grew up in a rural area of Columbia, and East lived in the busiest corridor of the cosmopolitan Panama City.

They talk about their musical influences, experiences growing up, coming to the U.S., and being Latino and Hispanic in Iowa.

Calle Sur is performing in Grinnell on April 5.

courtesy of FilmScene

As Hollywood continues to react to allegations of sexual harassment embodied in the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements, an Iowa theater is celebrating movies made by women. “Women’s March” at FilmScene in Iowa City is a series of movies and special events limited only by one criteria: the directors are women.

Classics, documentaries, new releases and shorts made by University of Iowa students and alumnae all are on the schedule this month.

LD Entertainment

A terrible accident, a heartbreaking loss, a community rallying together, and a storybook ending to a tough volleyball season: this story is far too familiar for the people who loved and lost 17-year-old Caroline Found of Iowa City in August 2011.

Riverside Theatre, Iowa City

When addiction and violent crime happen, the families of the perpetrators are often left out of the conversation.

Iowa-based playwright Jennifer Fawcett’s new play Apples in Winter gives us a complicated and emotional glimpse of the burden that these families carry through the story of Robert.  Robert has been on death row for 22 years after committing a horrible crime while in the grips of withdrawal, and his mother Miriam grants his final meal request for a slice of her homemade apple pie. 

The End of CDs

Mar 6, 2018
Pixabay

From old 78s and 45s on vinyl to 8 track tapes and cassettes, our methods of listening to music have undergone a number of significant evolutions in the last century. Most recently, the music industry has seen a major decline in CD sales as digital downloads and streaming services continue to dominate our music consumption. Best Buy and Target both recently announced that they plan to stop selling CDs in their stores.

But despite the increasing role of digitized music and the dwindling market for CDs, the demand for vinyl has seen a surprising resurgence.

Christopher Gannon

A new fashion exhibit at Iowa State University explores an area of fashion often stereotyped or misunderstood.

In this Talk of Iowa segment, Charity Nebbe talks to the woman behind “Queer Fashion and Style: Stories from the Heartland," Kelly Reddy-Best, assistant professor in Apparel, Merchandising & Design at Iowa State University.

Mike Weber

Photographer Mike Weber has been photographing Iowa musicians at live shows for the last eight years. During this Talk of Iowa interview, host Charity Nebbe talks to Weber about his photography, the Iowa music scene, and his upcoming exhibit at Raygun in Cedar Rapids March 1-8.

Weber is passionate about providing an accurate representation of Iowa’s music culture through his photography. He wants to see more photographers coming out to local shows.

The Iowa Rock and Roll Hall of Fame was founded in 1997 in Arnold’s Park, Iowa. Just over 10 years old, the hall has named a number of prominent Iowa musicians, music lovers and promoters to be a part of its legacy. Every year, there is a vote to induct people who have made a significant contribution to music in Iowa.

Emily Woodbury

Kevin "B.F." Burt of Coralville has been performing the blues for more than 20 years. He's beloved in Iowa, and has performed around the world.

This month, he won three first place awards at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee.

On this edition of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe talks with Burt about his humble solo performance origins at Baldy's Wraps in Iowa City, what it's like to be discovered after his performance in Memphis, and where he's focusing his energy next. 

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A few years ago, jazz vocalist Keri Johnsrud was talking with another musician about the role of music in children's television programs. 

"We started talking about Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood, and how the music in that program was so integral to the advancement of the stories and messages that he was telling on the program. And how jazz was especially was an important part of the show," she says.

Gabriel Cristóver Pérez

Last January, actor Woody Harrelson wrote, directed, and starred in a live feature film called Lost in London. The movie was shot in London and broadcast live into American theaters, with audiences watching the film in real time.

The movie is inspired by real life events, and while it is a comedy, it takes places entirely in what Harrelson describes as the worst night of his life: a 2002 incident when he was arrested for getting into a fight with a cab driver just days after a night of infidelity was exposed by a tabloid.

Photo Courtesy of Justin Roberts

There is a lot of children's music out there, and some of it is really bad. But over the course of the last two decades, children's music as a genre has become a home for many smart, funny, and talented musicians. Iowa native Justin Roberts is one of them. 

During this hour of Talk of Iowa, he talks with host Charity Nebbe about his newest album Lemonade, which has been nominated for a Grammy this year. It's his third time being nominated. 

On this album, he has several laugh out loud funny songs, including one called "Valentine."  

African American Museum of Iowa

The African American Museum of Iowa will offer free admission from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CST on Monday, January 15 in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. 

During this Talk of Iowa interview, host Charity Nebbe talks with LaNisha Cassell, the museum's executive director, and Felicite Wolfe, the museum's curator. 

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