Aging

Living Longer, But With More Pain

Oct 25, 2016
Tony Hall / Flickr

People are living longer. But that doesn’t always mean they’re living well longer. One of the reasons for the diminished quality of later life is back pain, which the latest Global Burden of Disease study recently named the second most common ailment affecting aging people across the globe. According to Dr. Joseph Chen, Director of the University of Iowa Spine Center, the prevalence of back pain is not surprising.

The Center for Volunteer Caregiving / Flickr

Over 317,000 Iowans care for an aging parent or loved one. While the focus is usually on the elderly person being cared for, caregivers often carry an unseen burden.

courtesy of Emily Woodbury

Emily Woodbury is getting married in two months. And while she had had extensive discussions with her future husband and her officiant, she decided to seek wisdom from one more source: her grandparents.

"They met in 1956 and sixty years later, they're still together. They're really happy together, and I admire that in a way. I hope that, sixty years from now, with a bit of luck, that me and my fiance are where they're at now. So I wanted to see if they had any advice for us."

Pat Blank/IPR

Ninety-six-year-old Rose became a fraud victim in 2013 when she received a sweepstakes letter in the mail at her northeast Iowa home, saying she’d won a Publisher’s Clearing House prize.

"I was supposed to get $2 million," she remembers. “It was my last paycheck and I cashed that. I think I even borrowed $8,000. And then he said they would be coming over. I said, 'how many people?’ and he said there’s seven of us. So I sent the money and nobody came."

Pat Blank/IPR

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Iowa is one of ten nationwide chosen by the Justice Department to form an Elder Justice Task Force.

All levels of government officials are part of the group, including both advocacy agencies and law enforcement officials.

FBI Agent Gabriel Poling says the goal is to identify and prosecute crimes such as financial exploitation as well as physical or emotional abuse.

Princeton University Press

"Appius Claudius was old and blind, yet he led a household of four vigorous sons, five daughters and many dependents.  He did not lazily succumb to old age but kept his mind taut as a bow."  So writes the great Roman orator and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero in 44 BC in a short treatise called "De Senectute." Cicero's prose is newly translated by Luther College's Philip Freeman.

Iowa Public Radio / Sarah Boden

Advocates for aging Iowans are asking the state legislature to reconsider its support for a bill that mandates hospitals provide instruction of medical tasks to caregivers, before a patient is discharged. 

The Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable Act (Care) failed to meet a critical deadline last week, so the future of the legislation looks dim. Advocates are stilling pushing for lawmakers' support, saying that caregiver training is particularly important because the majority of care provided to older Iowans is not performed by trained professionals, but by friends and family.

Flickr / Frits Ahlefeldt-Laurvig, hikingartist.com

"If you have to spend money to get money," says Polk County Attorney John Sarcone, "it's clearly a scam."

Yet many don't know this telltale sign, particularly Iowa seniors who are often the targets of fraud and embezzlement.

martinak15 / Flickr

What if a handful of your memories are fake? It’s likely that at least a few of them are.

“Much of our memory is reconstructive. It’s not like we’re pulling a book off a bookshelf. We’re creating it as we go,” explains Dr. Steven Anderson, Director of the Neuropsychological Rehabilitation Laboratory in the Department of Neurology at the University of Iowa. 

He says that while you can get better at remembering things with conscious effort, sometimes what we “remember” is what other people have told us about something that happened.  

A jury in northern Iowa has found a former state representative "not guilty" of sexually assaulting his late wife. Prosecutors alleged that Henry Rayhons of Garner had sex with his wife Donna, who wasn’t capable of consent due to her advanced Alzheimer’s disease. 

The jury took nearly two days to deliberate. This verdict ends a trial that has attracted international attention and raised complicated questions about the nature of consent for cognitively impaired adults.

Shortly before Denny Henrich turned 50, he ran his first marathon. 

Daniel Foster

While it often goes unreported, elder financial abuse costs older Americans 2 to 3 billion dollars per year.

Courtesy of Tanya Keith

The World Cup kicked off yesterday in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The USA team is slated to compete with Ghana on Monday (June 16). Here with us to preview the events is Tanya Keith, who has spent the last two decades avidly following the World Cup, quite literally, from country to country, as a super-fan. Tanya is from Des Moines, Iowa.

Guest: Tanya Keith, Author of Passionate Soccer Love, soccer fan, writer, Des Moines resident

Iowa State University Extension LIFE; used with permission / http://www.extension.iastate.edu/life

People are living longer, but are they living better, more healthy, more active lives?  Colin Milner is CEO of the International Council on Active Aging, and is visiting Iowa to talk about opportunities for governments, organizations, and individuals to take advantage to the changes that are ahead for people and communities.  Also on the program is Iowa State University Assistant Professor Sarah Francis, who also oversees ISU Extension's program Living Well Through Intergenerational Fitness and Exercise.

Julian Partridge / http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/legalcode

Forget the IRA for a minute.  How’s your portfolio for spending your time after retiring? Here’s a little advice and thoughts explored in this ‘Talk of Iowa’ program:

Make a plan. About a year before the retirement day, decide how you will be spending your time. Have a list of things to do: volunteering, learning a new skill, maintaining friendships and social networks, and develop ideas about how pieces of those goals can be accomplished every day.

Property of John Little.

While most of us were enjoying Thanksgiving leftovers, 61-year-old Iowa City resident John Little was completing his 13th Ironman Triathlon in Cozumel, an island off the Yucatan Peninsula.

An Ironman Triathlon consists of a 2.4-mile (3.86 km) swim, followed by a 112-mile (180.25 km) bicycle ride and ends with a marathon, which is a 26.2-mile (42.2 km) run. There are no breaks between each leg of the race. Host Ben Kieffer sits down with Little to discuss his extreme hobby, which he took up at the age of 55.

Sarah McCammon / Iowa Public Radio

As we continue our look at the rollout of Obamacare in Iowa, we now turn to the implications of the new law for seniors. One of the key tenets of health reform is making coverage more accessible, by requiring everyone to get insurance – and spreading the risk among the young and old, the healthy and the sick.  Experts say this means some younger, healthier workers will now pay more for their insurance. But for some older Iowans not yet eligible for Medicare, the rates will be within reach for the first time.

Evelyn Birkby

Iowa's fastest growing demographic is comprised of individuals over the age of 85 and according to the U.S. census, Iowa is the fifth oldest state in the nation.  Host Charity Nebbe discusses how Iowa's oldest residents can maintain a good quality of life in their 80s, 90s and beyond with gerontologist Peter Martin, whose research specializes in centenarians.

Menopause

Sep 18, 2013
Ryan Lintelman / flickr

Hot flashes, night sweat, insomnia, irritability, anxiety…not all women experience these symptoms when they go through menopause though many do. This hour Charity Nebbe tackles menopause with evolutionary biologist Anne Bronikowski who explains how menopause is unique to the human species. Also Judith Houck, author of Hot and Bothered: Women, Medicine and Menopause in Modern America and gynecologist Dr. Susan Johnson join the program.

Catherine Dietz-Kilen

Host Ben Kieffer talks with Claudia Beverly, the Ida Cordelia Beam Visiting Professor will be in Iowa in the coming weeks.  Hear about how to ensure seniors get appropriate and quality healthcare.  You will also hear from Tracey Robertson from the Heritage Area Agency on Aging, and two notable senior athletes to talk about physical fitness.

Fairywren / flickr

Once upon a time you and your sweetheart may have spent hot summer nights at the drive-in or cooled off at the soda fountain—but dating in 2013 is very different.  Join host Charity Nebbe on Talk of Iowa about dating and socializing for seniors.  We’ll talk about the importance of social engagement as we age and the dating scene at the senior center, retirement community, nursing home, and online.

Working Group Theatre

When Alzheimer's disease robs someone of their memory, it's not just that person who experiences loss.  "Talk of Iowa" explores the path of people who care for loved ones with memory loss. 

Sex offenders living next to Grandma?

Apr 19, 2012
Rachel Groves

A sex offender next door at the nursing home? It could pose a very real problem as Iowa’s population ages. After a 95-year-old woman was attacked by a fellow resident at her nursing home, the legislature stepped forward to act. But there's been some heated debate in the Iowa Senate.