Weekend Edition Saturday on IPR News and News/Studio One

Saturdays at 7 a.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One
 

From civil wars in Bosnia and El Salvador, to hospital rooms, police stations, and America's backyards, National Public Radio's Peabody Award-winning correspondent Scott Simon brings a well-traveled perspective to his role as host of "Weekend Edition Saturday."

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Simon Says
8:05 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Let's Play Two! Remembering Chicago Cub Ernie Banks

Chicago Cub Ernie Banks, right, told NPR's Scott Simon, left, in 2014 that he had a lot of fun winning games, but the main thing in his life was "making friends."
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:00 am

Every Saturday just before our show begins I get on the public address system here to announce to our crew, "It's a beautiful day for a radio show. Let's do two today!"

It's an admiring imitation of Ernie Banks, the Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame baseball player who died last night at the age of 83. Ernie used to say, especially in the long years of hot summers — including this last one, when the Cubs were stuck in last place — "It's a beautiful day for a ballgame. Let's play two today!"

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Technology
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Facebook Aims To Weed Fakes From Your News Feed

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:12 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Sports
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Remembering Ernie Banks, A Fan Favorite Whose Favorite Was The Fans

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 10:29 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Obama's India Visit Arrives At A Moment Of Optimism

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 3:15 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Author Interviews
7:44 am
Sat January 24, 2015

Why A Black Man's Murder Often Goes Unpunished In Los Angeles

Originally published on Sat January 24, 2015 11:15 am

In the State of the Union this week, President Obama noted that crime in America is down. "For the first time in 40 years," he said, "the crime rate and the incarceration rate have come down together."

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Latin America
9:51 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Traveling To Cuba Getting Easier, But Expect Turbulence On The Way

Travelers wait to check in for charter flights from Miami to Havana at Miami International Airport.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 3:03 pm

New rules that went into effect on Friday mark the biggest change in U.S. relations with Cuba in more than 50 years.

While tourism remains off-limits, the Obama administration opened new opportunities in Cuba for banks, airlines, telecommunications companies and regular Americans.

For the first time in decades, under the new rules, Americans who don't have family on the island can travel to Cuba without receiving special permission from the U.S. government.

No Tourists Allowed — Yet

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Movies
9:13 am
Sat January 17, 2015

And The Oscar Goes To ... Wait, Who Hasn't Had One In A While?

Robert Duvall (right) was nominated for Best Supporting Actor for his role in The Judge, which also starred Robert Downey Jr. The nomination left many critics scratching their heads.
Claire Folger AP

Originally published on Sun January 18, 2015 9:59 pm

"The right actors win Oscars, but for the wrong roles," Katharine Hepburn once said.

The Motion Picture Academy has a history of rewarding stars for less-than-celestial performances, and this week's Oscar nomination announcements left a lot of people scratching their heads — over the snubs for Selma, for example, and the nomination of Robert Duvall for best supporting actor in The Judge.

"I think most people hadn't even heard of The Judge before that nomination," says Alyssa Rosenberg, culture columnist for The Washington Post.

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All Tech Considered
8:43 am
Sat January 17, 2015

As Cities Push For Their Own Broadband, Cable Firms Say Not So Fast

Provo, Utah, is one of three cities in which Google is rolling out its Google Fiber gigabit Internet and television service.
George Frey Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue January 20, 2015 11:07 am

Americans increasingly see decently fast Internet as more like a functioning sewer line than a luxury.

And a number of cities are trying to get into the Internet provider business, but laws in 19 states hamper those efforts. President Obama announced this week that he wants to lift those restrictions, and supporters of what is known as municipal broadband can't wait.

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Africa
6:43 am
Sat January 17, 2015

In Nigeria, Boko Haram Continues Its Campaign Of Terror

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sports
6:41 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Four Teams Will Narrow To Two On This NFL Playoff Weekend

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 10:57 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
6:33 am
Sat January 17, 2015

A Fish Gets A New Eye And An Edge In The Tank

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 10:57 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Nothing worse than being bullied in school, especially if you're a fish.

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Music Interviews
6:33 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Meghan Trainor's Confidence Got A Boost From 'That Bass'

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 10:57 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Animals
6:33 am
Sat January 17, 2015

Are Stripes A Zebra's Cooling System?

Originally published on Sat January 17, 2015 10:57 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Economy
9:33 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Employment Is Up. Paychecks, Not So Much

A protester demonstrates for higher wages for fast food workers in Jackson, Miss., in December. Employers are hiring more people, but overall, the wages they're paying remain flat.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

The U.S. economy saw the strongest job growth last year since 1999, according to statistics released Friday by the Department of Labor. The country gained another 252,000 jobs in December.

That's the good news — but this jobs report also dashed some hopes for fatter paychecks. Employers are hiring more people, but overall, the wages they're paying remain flat.

A month ago, it seemed wages were starting to pick up — but those November numbers were revised lower. In December, wages actually fell slightly.

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Movie Interviews
9:16 am
Sat January 10, 2015

'Theory Of Everything' Probes Stephen Hawkings' Love, Not Theory

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Simon Says
9:14 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Satire May Be Uncomfortable, But Humor Makes Us Human

A man holds a pencil in the air during a minute of silence in Paris on Thursday for the cartoonists and other victims of gunmen on the offices of French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo.
Matthieu Alexandre AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

Satire is a tricky business. The punch lines quickly get stale. The same people who laugh at one joke can get offended by the next.

But this week, with the targeted killings of the cartoon satirists of Charlie Hebdo in Paris, we were reminded how dangerous people with no sense of humor can be.

The Onion ran a headline: "It is Sadly Unclear Whether This Article Will Put Lives At Risk."

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Politics
6:50 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Keystone Supporters Hope Amendments Will Soften Pipeline Opposition

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Parallels
6:50 am
Sat January 10, 2015

7 Decades On, Israel Still Seeks Resolutions For 'Holocaust Art'

James Snyder, director of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, with Egon Schiele's 1915 work, Krumau Town Crescent I. It's one of about 1,000 works of Nazi-confiscated art the museum has received. The museum has no record of who owned the painting before it was taken by the Nazis. In some 40 cases, the museum has returned artworks when heirs were found.
Daniel Estrin for NPR

Originally published on Sun January 11, 2015 11:02 am

Before and during World War II, the Nazis seized up to 600,000 works of art from all across Europe. This has created a long-running drama that is still playing out from movie studios in Hollywood to museums in Israel.

If you saw last year's movie The Monuments Men, starring George Clooney, then you know the story line. Toward the end of the war, American and Allied forces sent teams on a treasure hunt through Europe.

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Sports
6:50 am
Sat January 10, 2015

Cowboys-Packers Game Promises To Be A Second 'Ice Bowl'

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Remembrances
6:50 am
Sat January 10, 2015

An Evangelist Who Spread The Gospel Of The Accordion

Originally published on Sat January 10, 2015 10:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Opinion
11:16 am
Sat January 3, 2015

Egypt's Citizens Still Wait 'To Breathe Deep The Air Of Freedom'

Anti-government demonstrators celebrated in Tahrir Square upon hearing the news of the resignation of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak on Feb. 11, 2011.
John Moore Getty Images

Amid all the holiday celebrations, you may have missed this story from overseas.

An Egyptian court announced a retrial for three journalists from Al Jazeera who have been languishing in jail for more than a year for the crime of reporting the news. The scheduled retrial is a small step in the right direction for a nation that has seen its historic revolution of just four years ago almost totally reversed.

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Race
10:11 am
Sat January 3, 2015

The Goal: To Remember Each Jim Crow Killing, From The '30s On

Police watch a crowd of African-Americans as they wait for a car pool lift in 1956 during the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
Don Cravens The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 1:00 pm

The state of race relations in the United States has captivated the country for months. But a group of Northeastern University law students is looking to the past to a sometimes forgotten, violent part of American history.

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Starting Over
9:08 am
Sat January 3, 2015

From Pulpit To Politics: A Pastor Takes Her Work To The Wider World

After three decades as a pastor, Faith Whitmore fulfills her vocation outside the pulpit, as district director for U.S. Rep. Ami Bera, D-Calif.
Courtesy Faith Whitmore

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 10:59 am

This is part of a series of stories about starting over, profiling people who, by choice or circumstance, reinvented or transformed themselves.

Faith Whitmore was ordained as a pastor 30 years ago, drawn by a deep sense of God and spirit within her. She worked at churches throughout the Sacramento, Calif., region, eventually becoming senior pastor at one of the largest United Methodist congregations.

It was like running a small business, she says.

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Health
8:48 am
Sat January 3, 2015

Needle Exchange Program Creates Black Market In Clean Syringes

Originally published on Wed January 7, 2015 2:54 pm

On Friday afternoons, several dozen people line up in the narrow hallway of Prevention Point Philadelphia. The men and women, all ages, hold paper and plastic bags full of used syringes.

"We obviously have a space challenge, but people come in, they drop off their used syringes and they ask for what they need," says Silvana Mazzella, the director of programs at the service center for injection drug users.

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Space
7:00 am
Sat January 3, 2015

NASA Hopes A Hack Will Overcome Mars Rover's Memory Gap

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 10:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

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Remembrances
7:00 am
Sat January 3, 2015

Remembering The Voice Of Babe The Pig

Originally published on Sat January 3, 2015 10:59 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

You probably won't realize that you recognize Christine Cavanaugh until you hear her. The actress gave voice to popular cartoon and film characters throughout the 1990s, and last month, she passed away. NPR's Jasmine Garsd has this remembrance.

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Author Interviews
7:00 am
Sat January 3, 2015

The Zig-Zagging History Of The Number Zero

Originally published on Tue January 13, 2015 5:52 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Law
10:10 am
Sat December 27, 2014

Finding A Jury Of Your Peers Actually Is Pretty Complicated

Demonstrators march in New York after grand juries failed to indict police officers in the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown. Many are calling for the officers to be tried before a jury of their peers.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Mon December 29, 2014 12:05 pm

Over the past few weeks, thousands of people have protested after grand juries failed to indict police officers in the deaths of Eric Garner and Michael Brown. What they wanted was to have the officers tried in an open court before a jury of their peers. But the notion of a jury of your peers isn't so straightforward.

Take, for example, 21-year-old Roderick Giles' experience. When he got a jury summons in the mail, he reacted the way a lot of people do.

"I did not want to go to jury duty," he says. "That was the last thing on my mind to do."

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U.S.
8:41 am
Sat December 27, 2014

For Cubans In Key West, A Longing To Fill In 'Gaps Of Who We Are'

Cuba is 90 miles away from the southernmost point in the United States, in Key West, Fla. "There used to be a ferry that ran between the two islands every day," says 89-year-old Gregorio Garcia, who emigrated in 1958. "I hope they operate it again someday."
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 10:10 am

Like Cuban-American families throughout the diaspora, the Garcias of Key West, Fla., gather on Noche Buena, or Christmas Eve, to catch up on news and eat a traditional meal of lechón, or roast pig.

Wayne Garcia, a local building contractor and artist, prepared the pork for the family feast this year. He smokes it for seven hours in a hole dug in his backyard, in a style he says was passed down from his great-grandparents.

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Around the Nation
6:50 am
Sat December 27, 2014

High Electric Bills Gobble Up Savings From Cheap Oil In New England

Originally published on Sat December 27, 2014 10:10 am

Falling oil prices are perhaps nowhere more welcome than in northern New England, where most homes burn heating oil in their furnaces and high electricity prices are going up.

This story originally aired on Morning Edition on Dec. 22, 2014.

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