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Weekdays from 5 a.m. to 9 a.m.
Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne
Clay Masters

For more than two decades, NPR's "Morning Edition" has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 13 million listeners, "Morning Edition" draws public radio's largest audience.

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Food
6:13 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Cheap Cheese Smuggled Across Canadian Border

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 10:17 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Wed September 26, 2012

See You Later Alligator, At My Kid's Party

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Africa
4:06 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Liberia To Investigate Logging Of Rainforests

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's go next to West Africa, where logging rights to more than 60 percent of Liberia's virgin rainforests have been granted to forestry companies since President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf came to power six years ago. A British advocacy group says the majority of those contracts are unregulated and warns of fraud and mismanagement. The government of Liberia says it is commissioning a full-scale investigation.

Tamasin Ford reports from Liberia.

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Business
4:06 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Ford Announes Job Cuts In Europe

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news business with some bad news for automakers.

Ford is cutting jobs in Europe. Sales in the European Union are down 12 percent this year; that's what a financial crisis will do for you. Bloomberg reports a few hundred workers, mostly in Germany and the United Kingdom, will be getting the axe. And the pioneering electric car maker Tesla Motors has announced that it is selling five million shares to raise much needed cash.

Business
4:06 am
Wed September 26, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our last word today in business today is poison, as in box office poison. That's what John Crawford was once called by theater owners.

But she showed them, with her comeback movie, "Mildred Pierce."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

When she was nominated for Best Actress, Crawford was so nervous, she skipped the Academy Award ceremony. Last night her Oscar from "Mildred Pierce" sold at auction for $426,732.

GREENE: And here's what John Crawford said about that Oscar: I deserved it.

INSKEEP: As do you, David.

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The Salt
2:31 am
Wed September 26, 2012

How Food And Clothing Size Labels Affect What We Eat And What We Wear

There's no industry standard size for food and drink portions, so it's hard to compare a Big Gulp with a McDonald's medium soda.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 7:35 pm

When you go into a restaurant, you probably give some thought to whether you're ordering a small, regular or large sandwich.

That makes sense.With widening waistlines across the land, many of us want to make a health-conscious choice. But are we really getting a small portion when we order a small sandwich?

Well, that depends.

University of Michigan marketing professor Aradhna Krishna has studied how labels impact how much we eat. In one experiment, she gave people cookies that were labeled either medium or large, and then measured how much they ate.

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Around the Nation
2:30 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Bonnie And Clyde's Guns, Other Items Go On Auction

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow are seen in an undated photo. The couple captured headlines with a long crime spree before being shot to death in an ambush in Louisiana.
AP

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 10:22 am

Nearly 80 years after the deaths of bank robbers Bonnie and Clyde, a few, shall we say, "tools of their trade" are going up for auction. Among them are his Colt .45 and her .38 Special, which could each go for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

When former Texas Ranger Frank Hamer eventually caught up with Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow in 1934, a newsreel announcer declared "the inevitable end: retribution. Here is Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker, who died as they lived: by the gun."

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Latin America
2:29 am
Wed September 26, 2012

After 48 Years Of War, Colombians Plan Peace Talks

A member of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, runs to take position during a firefight with the Colombian army in the mountains of Cauca state on July 12. For now, fighting continues even as the two sides prepare for peace talks.
Luis Robayo AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

After fighting for power for nearly 50 years, a Colombian rebel group is now opting to negotiate a peace deal with President Juan Manuel Santos' government and bring the country's slow-burning but brutal conflict to an end.

Most of Colombia's 47 million people are supportive of talks, which begin soon in Oslo, Norway, before moving to Havana.

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Music
1:03 am
Wed September 26, 2012

Brother Ali: A Voice For The Suffering

Brother Ali's fifth studio album, Mourning in America and Dreaming in Color, came out last week.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

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Sweetness And Light
9:03 pm
Tue September 25, 2012

RG3: A Game Changer For 'Thirds' Everywhere

Washington Redskins quarterback Robert Griffin III watches from the sidelines. RG3 as he is known has a fan in other thirds like Frank Deford.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 26, 2012 9:36 am

We're all familiar with the many sports terms that have moved into general usage: "par for the course," "slam-dunk," "curveball," "photo finish" and so on.

Curiously, though, every now and then something of the inverse occurs, and we get an expression which is commonly used that has been derived from sport, but never used in sport.

For example, that awful, overdone cliche, "level playing field." Never in my life have I ever heard anyone in sport — that is, somebody actually right there on the level playing field — say, "I'm glad we're playing on a level playing field."

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U.S.
11:00 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Obama: No Video Justifies Attack On Embassy

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

At the United Nations today, President Obama told world leaders that there's no place for violence and intolerance. The president has been struggling to contain widespread anger in the Muslim world, sparked in part by an anti-Islam video.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Animals
5:54 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Crocodile Busts Out Of Airplane's Holding Bin

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Clinton Aide, Reporter In Profane E-Mail Exchange

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. A State Department spokesman had an angry email exchange with a reporter, and Philippe Reines wrote: Feel free to use every word. So the reporter did, publishing their whole profane exchange, like this high-toned dialogue:

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm misreading you as needlessly antagonistic.

INSKEEP: No, you read my email correctly. I found your statement offensive.

GREENE: Why ask questions you've already decided you know the answers to?

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Sports
4:19 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Calls Grow For NFL To Settle Dispute With Refs

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, as if NFL fans weren't ticked off enough about the replacement referees who are officiating this season's games, we bring you last night. The Seattle Seahawks beat the Green Bay Packers in the final seconds to win 14 to 12, at least that's how the refs on the field saw it. The outcome is prompting new calls for the NFL and its regular officials to settle this labor dispute that prompted the league to lock out their officials in June. Joining me to talk about last night is NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman.

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World
4:04 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Clinton Kicks Off A Busy Week Of Diplomacy

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

President Obama addresses the United Nations General Assembly today, at a time when U.S. embassies and consulates have been the target of protests across the Muslim world. Mr. Obama's aides say he will use this speech to again condemn the anti-Islam video that offended many Muslims.

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Business
3:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Apple Runs Out Of Initial iPhone 5 Stock

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with: somebody restock the shelves.

Apple says it sold more than 5 million of its new iPhone 5s over the weekend. The company says it has now run out of its initial stock. On its debut weekend, the iPhone 5 sold better than the last version of the iPhone. But sales were not quite as strong as many analyst expectations, and there are concerns about Apple's ability to keep up with demand.

Business
3:49 am
Tue September 25, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And today's last word in business comes from Tony the Tiger.

(SOUNDBITE OF COMMERCIAL)

LEE MARSHALL: They're greeeaaat.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

INSKEEP: A simple statement. But Tony may have to learn how to say it in Chinese because his parent company, Kellogg, just inked a deal with a firm in Singapore.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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It's All Politics
2:29 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Romney's Medicaid Remarks On '60 Minutes' Raise Eyebrows

Mitt Romney talks with 60 Minutes correspondent Scott Pelley.
AP

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 3:21 pm

It's not so much what Mitt Romney said about whether the government should guarantee people health care in his interview on CBS's 60 Minutes Sunday that has health care policy types buzzing. It's how that compares to what he has said before.

To back up a bit, Scott Pelley asked the former Massachusetts governor if he thinks "the government has a responsibility to provide health care to the 50 million Americans who don't have it today?"

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Fine Art
2:28 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Print-Inspired Art: All The News That's Fit To Paint

Alfredo Ramos Martinez painted Head of a Nun, tempera on newspaper, in 1934.
Gerard Vuilleumier The Alfredo Ramos Martinez Research Project, Reproduced by Permission

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

The print newspaper industry may be struggling, but newsprint is alive and well on the walls of a new exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The show is called "Shock of the News" — and it examines a century's worth of interaction between artists and the journals of their day.

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Business
2:27 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Chicago Pits Quieter, But Traders' Outcries Linger

Traders work in the bond pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1995. In recent decades, much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.
Michael S. Green AP

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 7:18 pm

The trading pits at the Chicago Board of Trade and the Mercantile Exchange have long been potent symbols of American capitalism. And they used to be as rough and tumble as the city itself, where burly men bought and sold commodities like hogs, cattle, corn and soybeans.

Trading volume has gone up considerably in recent years, but Chicago's trading pits are tamer places today — the result of a revolution futures trading has undergone over the past quarter century. Much of the trading has left the pits and gone electronic.

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Around the Nation
2:25 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Phone Home: Tech Draws Parents, College Kids Closer

University of North Carolina sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson (left) and her mother, Robin, use text-messaging, email and social media to stay in touch.
Courtesy of Robin Dawson

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

From breakfast to bedtime, college sophomore Julia-Scott Dawson and her mother, Robin Dawson, exchange a flurry of texts that include I love you's, inside jokes and casual chitchat.

"We talk every day," Dawson says.

"Every day," echoes her mother.

Julia-Scott Dawson is a sophomore at the University of North Carolina, which is just a 15-minute drive from where her parents live. Every week, she shares a Sunday meal with her family and grabs morning coffee with her parents when they can.

"I just love the time I spend with them," Dawson says.

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Asia
2:21 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Americans In China Feel Pinch Of Shifting Economies

China has welcomed U.S. business expertise for many years as its economy has advanced rapidly. Jim Rogers, a prominent U.S. investor, is shown here in China at the 2nd Hunan Finance Expo in 2011. However, the Chinese are becoming more confident in their own business skills and more critical of American practices in recent years, according to U.S. business executives working in China.
ChinaFotoPress Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

In recent years, China's status — like its economy — has continued to rise as the economies in America and Europe have struggled.

That shift isn't just reflected in economic numbers, and some American business people in China say they don't feel as respected or as valued as before.

Not long after Michael Fagle arrived in Shanghai in 2005 with DuPont, he went to visit a Chinese customer. Back then, Fagle says, he was treated as a sage from the West.

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Shots - Health Blog
2:19 am
Tue September 25, 2012

Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries

Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome.
Eric Kayne for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 11:00 am

Sara Terry's first clue that something was wrong with her son, Christian, came just three weeks after he was born.

"We went to check on him, just like any parents go and check on their kids just to make sure they're breathing," says Terry, 34, of Spring, Texas. "And we found him in his crib, and he wasn't breathing. He was blue."

She and her husband were horrified. They rushed Christian to the hospital and learned he had several medical problems.

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The Record
11:03 pm
Mon September 24, 2012

Crowd Funding For Musicians Isn't The Future; It's The Present

The Physics, with Thig Nat at the right.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 1:24 pm

By now, everyone's heard of Kickstarter, the website that lets people with an idea or project ask other people to contribute toward realizing it. It's called crowd funding, and this summer's big success story was musician Amanda Palmer. She raised more than $1 million to produce her new album. But crowd funding doesn't work for every musician every time.

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Monkey See
10:10 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Making A Comedy Pilot? You Might Want To Call James Burrows

In a 2001 photo, actress Debra Messing and director James Burrows pose together after Burrows won a Directors Guild of America award for directing the pilot of Will & Grace.
Chris Weeks Getty Images

Originally published on Wed November 6, 2013 2:41 pm

"It's staggering."

Read more
World
6:10 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Canadian Man Returns To Ireland To Find Lost Love

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 10:10 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Sandy Crocker has gone more than 500 miles for love. The Canadian man was touring in Ireland when he met a freckled woman with reddish brown hair. They spoke for a couple minutes at a café, then she left. Back in Canada, he was heartbroken.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I'M GONNA BE (500 MILES)")

THE PROCLAIMERS: (Singing) But I would walk 500 miles, and I would walk 500 more...

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Mon September 24, 2012

S.C. Shooting Range Rents Automatic Weapons

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Asia
4:38 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Foxconn Temporarily Closes iPhone Plant After Riot

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. A riot involving at least 2,000 workers broke out late last night at a Foxconn facility in northern China, where employees make iPhones. Foxconn says about 40 people went to the hospital with injuries. Now, in recent years Foxconn has come under intense scrutiny for the working conditions in its factories. Now we have this episode, so we're bringing in NPR's Frank Langfitt, who's following the story from Shanghai.

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Africa
4:28 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Libyan Government To Disband Rogue Groups

Soldiers from the Libyan National Army get ready to enter the compound of Rafallah al-Sahati in Benghazi on Saturday. Libya's president announced that all government-aligned militias will now report to the army chief of staff, and that all other armed groups must disband.
Mohammad Hannon AP

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Violent protests in eastern Libya have set in motion a movement to take back the nation from dozens of militias born from the revolt against strongman Moammar Gadhafi. Since the dictator's demise, Libya has been beholden to men with guns.

The transitional state is weak, and it depends on the militias to help secure the streets. The state has now promised to integrate the militias into the security forces.

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Latin America
4:07 am
Mon September 24, 2012

Mexican Drug War Chokes Nuevo Laredo With Fear

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:08 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The city of Nuevo Laredo, which hugs the border of south Texas, is the latest hotspot in Mexico's violent drug war. Over the past two weeks, over 70 people have been killed there in drug-related violence. Monica Ortiz Uribe from member station KJZZ visited the city and she found a community terrified and afraid to even speak.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Foreign language spoken)

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