Morning Edition on IPR News and News/Studio One

Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne, Clay Masters

Weekdays at 5 a.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

For more than two decades, NPR's "Morning Edition" has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 13 million listeners, "Morning Edition" draws public radio's largest audience.

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The Salt
2:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Why Skipping Breakfast Might Raise Risk Of Heart Disease

Skipping breakfast is risky.
iphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 2:18 pm

Breakfast has long gotten a good rap for everything from aiding weight loss to improving focus in the classroom.

And ever since the Alameda County study in California back in the 1960s linked breakfast — along with a host of other habits — to a longer lifespan, there's been a societal push towards breaking the fast.

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Shots - Health News
9:15 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Laws Limiting Abortion May Face Challenges On 20-Week Limit

Becca Besaw of Austin, Texas, and Christopher Robertson of Fort Worth, Texas, protest the state's new law restricting access to abortion at a rally in Dallas on July 15.
Tony Gutierrez AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 3:57 pm

Banning abortions after a specific point in pregnancy has been a popular trend in the states this year. Last week, GOP Gov. Rick Perry made Texas the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks.

But how states define the starting point for that 20 weeks may cause headaches for women and their doctors — and ultimately affect whether these laws pass constitutional muster.

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Sports
5:44 am
Mon July 22, 2013

In The Tour De France, Even The Loser Is A Winner

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The winner of the Tour de France gets a yellow jersey but let's focus now on the lanterne rouge. That's the term for the guy who finishes last. It translates to red lantern, like that found on the caboose of a train. Yesterday, 36-year-old Canadian Svein Tuft took the honor with his 169th place finish. It turns out that the lanterne rouge is hotly contested. Just finishing brings glory and lucrative appearances. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

World
5:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Septuagenarian Superhero? Man Lifts Car Off Son-In-Law

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 6:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with a tale of neither a bird nor a plane. Cecil Stuckless was fixing a Jeep in Salvage, Newfoundland with his son-in-law, who was working under the car. Stuckless told the CBC he was getting a tool when the car suddenly fell. He summoned all his strength and lifted the Jeep just enough to save his son-in-law. Impressive for anybody, let alone a 72-year-old.

Asked if he was Superman, Cecil said: No, I'm not super. I just did what I could.

NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

State Abortion Laws Differ From Doctors In Defining 20 Weeks

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 9:30 am

Texas last week became the 12th state to ban most abortions after 20 weeks. But most of the state laws don't define 20 weeks the same way doctors do.

NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Encore: The Many Musical Careers Of Katie Crutchfield

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:04 am

Alabama-born singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield broke through to a bigger audience last year by releasing an aching, bare-bones solo album. Her follow-up album came out in March. (This story originally aired on Weekend Edition Sunday on June 23, 2013.)

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Energy Standards For Ceiling Fans Spin Up D.C. Debate

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In these dog days of summer, a ceiling fan still offers an inexpensive way to cool down - except maybe in the nation's capital, Washington, D.C., where a partisan battle is heating up over efficiency standards proposed by the Obama administration. The Energy Department is in the early stages of crafting new rules to encourage the spread of ceiling fans that use less electricity, but House Republicans want to put that idea on ice. NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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Parallels
2:34 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Brazil's Evangelicals A Growing Force In Prayer, Politics

Evangelical Christians pray during the "March for Jesus" in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Saturday, June 29, 2013.
Nelson Antoine AP

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 1:32 pm

Pope Francis arrives Monday evening in Rio de Janeiro for a weeklong visit celebrating World Youth Day. Hundreds of thousands of Catholics have made the pilgrimage to see the Argentine-born pontiff, and he is expected to receive a rapturous welcome.

Still, Pope Francis's visit comes at a delicate time for the church in Brazil. Catholicism — the nation's main religion — is facing a huge challenge from evangelicals.

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The Salt
2:33 am
Mon July 22, 2013

New York Toasts Long-Awaited Revival Of Its Distilleries

Tuthilltown Spirits in New York makes a clear corn whiskey, and the first legal aged whiskey in the state since Prohibition, among other products.
Joel Rose/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:30 am

A century ago, New York could claim that much of its liquor was local, thanks to distilleries large and small that supplied a lot of the whiskey, gin and rum that kept New York City (and the rest of North America) lubricated. Then Prohibition arrived and the industry largely dried up, before trickling back to life in the 21st century.

Now, distillers in New York state are toasting a revival 80 years in the making.

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Nickel Tour: Get To Know Great Tour Guides
2:32 am
Mon July 22, 2013

Little Bighorn Tour Guide Brings Battle To Life

Seasonal Ranger Mike Donahue (right) discuses the Battle of Little Bighorn with Jon Jones atop Custer Hill.
Jim Kent NPR

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 11:04 am

On a scorching hot summer afternoon along the banks of the Little Bighorn River in Montana, seasonal ranger Mike Donahue brings the historical Battle of Little Bighorn to life with remarkable enthusiasm and passion.

At a recent presentation, Donahue welcomes a crowd to the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. "Why did it happen in the first place?" he asks during the presentation. "Because you had two peoples that really didn't understand or appreciate one another very well."

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World
6:39 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Pitch-Drop Worse Than Watching Paint Dry

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Even if you have been bored watching paint dry or grass grow or water boil, you have nothing on these scientists. An experiment that began in 1944 at Trinity College in Ireland just now has a definitive result - to test whether a thick substance called pitch flowed and dripped. A funnel with the stuff was placed over a jar. Seventy years later students saw a drip forming, set up a camera, and witnessed the drip drop. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:26 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Canadian Woman Picks Marriage Proposal Over Jail Time

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Marcia Belyea was on a drive with her boyfriend when she heard a police siren. The Canadian woman was pulled over and told she owed $2,000 in parking tickets and faced 30 days in jail. As she wept in the police car, Belyea was offered a deal. Charges would be dropped if she took her boyfriend's hand in marriage.

Yes, this traumatic event was an elaborate wedding proposal. Believe it or not, she said yes. But Marcia, you have the right to revenge.

Around the Nation
5:00 am
Fri July 19, 2013

A Year After Colo. Shooting, Trial Still Far Off

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Costume-Clad Comic-Con Fans Descend On San Diego

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Some 130,000 fans are converging on the convention center in San Diego for this year's Comic-Con, the world's largest pop culture convention. One big draw will be the appearance of fantasy writer Neil Gaiman who, after a long hiatus, is bringing back his best-selling comic Sandman. Here to tell us what she's seeing so far is Gina McIntyre. She's the editor of Hero Complex, the pop culture blog at the Los Angeles Times. Good morning.

GINA MCINTYRE: Good morning.

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Europe
5:00 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Russian Opposition Leader Convicted Amid Controversy

A Russian court has convicted one of the country's most prominent opposition leaders of embezzlement. Alexei Navalny faces a sentence of five years in prison in a controversial case that he says was trumped up to derail his political career. Navalny was instrumental in organizing mass protests against the rule of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Fri July 19, 2013

In Dubai, Weight Loss Is Worth Gold

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:06 am

If you want people to slim down, why not reward them with gold? That's the tack being taken in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. For every kilogram lost, the government will pay out a gram of gold.

NPR Story
4:10 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Federal Judge Green Lights Suit Against Private Equity Firms

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 5:00 am

The investor lawsuit claims the companies, including Blackstone, Carlyle and Bain Capital, colluded to drive down prices on hundreds of billions of dollars in takeovers.

U.S.
3:35 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Pa. City Tries Wild West Auction To Rope In Cash

A Harrisburg Wild West artifact sits inside of a warehouse building owned by the city, seen here in 2011.
Craig Layne WITF

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 5:43 am

Leaders in Harrisburg, Pa., hope the legends of the Wild West will ride to the rescue of the cash-strapped state capital. Thanks to a former mayor's eccentric, failed museum project, the city has an extensive collection of Wild West artifacts — some said to have ties to people like Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and Buffalo Bill.

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Code Switch
2:26 am
Fri July 19, 2013

How To Fight Racial Bias When It's Silent And Subtle

Researchers say it may be possible to temporarily reduce racial biases.
Images.com Corbis

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 7:00 pm

In the popular imagination and in conventional discourse — especially in the context of highly charged news events such as the shooting of Trayvon Martin — prejudice is all about hatred and animosity.

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Shots - Health News
2:23 am
Fri July 19, 2013

White House Muddles Obamacare Messaging — Again

President Obama walks off the stage after speaking about the Affordable Care Act during an event in the East Room of the White House on Thursday. Obama argued that the law is holding insurance companies accountable and putting money back into the pockets of consumers.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:13 am

This summer was supposed to be a time to reintroduce the public to the Affordable Care Act and teach people how to sign up for benefits this fall.

But that's not what's happening.

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StoryCorps
2:23 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Grandpa's Story: A Comb, Penknife And Handkerchief

Leonard Carpenter in Kentucky, where he grew up, in the early 1940s.
Photo courtesy of Lynne Bruschetti

Jack Bruschetti was born in 1999, the same year his grandfather, Leonard Carpenter, died from Alzheimer's disease.

But 13-year-old Jack wanted to know more about his grandfather, who worked as a tire builder for BFGoodrich in Akron, Ohio, where he also raised his family.

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The Record
11:05 pm
Thu July 18, 2013

20 Years Ago, Tupac Broke Through

Tupac Shakur on the set of Poetic Justice.
Everett Collection / Rex USA

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 6:37 pm

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Around the Nation
6:00 am
Thu July 18, 2013

96-Year-Old Store Owner Wins Standoff With Robber

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Magaretta Wolf has owned a grocery store in Marshfield, Wisconsin for more than 50 years. So when a masked robber recently demanded she hand over the store's cash, she refused, saying you can have all the Tootsie Rolls you want but I am not opening that cash register. By the way, Wolf is 96.

Around the Nation
5:14 am
Thu July 18, 2013

PayPal Glitch Makes Pa. Man Very Rich

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

For a moment, Chris Reynolds was the world's richest man. The Pennsylvania resident checked his PayPal account, expecting a zero balance. Instead he found a credit of more than $92 quadrillion. That 17-digit figure did revert back to zero when PayPal corrected the glitch. Still, a guy can dream. As to how he would have spent the money, Reynolds said: Payoff the national debt, then maybe buy the Phillies.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
4:07 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Police In India Probe Poisoning Of School Children

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Politics
4:07 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Congress Takes Renewed Aim At Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

For the first time since the housing crash, lawmakers are getting serious about dismantling the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. They were rescued with $190 million bailout. Two prominent senators - a Democrat and a Republican - have a bill that's attracting some bipartisan support. A separate Republican bill is being introduced in the House today and a third may soon come from Democrats. NPR's Chris Arnold reports.

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World
4:07 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Panama Searches Impounded North Korean Cargo Ship

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

As of this morning, Panama still doesn't know quite what to do with that North Korean cargo ship its impounded. The ship was going through the Panama Canal on its way from Cuba to North Korea. And when Panamanian authorities looked inside under thousands of bags of Cuban sugar, they found parts for missiles, jets and radar systems.

Here to help sort out this discovery is NPR's Tom Gjelten. Good morning.

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Parallels
2:25 am
Thu July 18, 2013

As Nelson Mandela Turns 95, South Africa Celebrates

Supporters of Nelson Mandela rally outside the Mediclinic Heart Hospital in Pretoria, South Africa, where he has been treated for more than a month. The anti-apartheid icon turned 95 on Thursday.
Jonathan Blakley NPR

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 9:39 am

While South Africa celebrates the 95th birthday of Nelson Mandela on Thursday, the former president and Nobel Peace Prize laureate remains at a Pretoria hospital, where he's been hospitalized since June 8 with a recurring lung infection.

President Jacob Zuma's office has said that Mandela is in "critical but stable" condition, though Mandela's daughter Zindzi said Wednesday that her father was making "remarkable progress" and could be released soon.

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Code Switch
2:20 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Comedian Hari Kondabolu On Diversity, Race And Burger King

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:20 pm

Hari Kondabolu is a brainy comedian who cuts through the polite talk around race and gender. He's made a lot of key people laugh with his incisive anecdotes, including Jimmy Kimmel, Conan O'Brien and John Oliver.

A full-time writer on the FX show Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, he recently did a comedy bit on the National Spelling Bee, or "as I like to call it," he joked, "the Indian Super Bowl."

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Parallels
2:19 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Al-Jazeera Under Fire For Its Coverage Of Egypt

Posters in Cairo show Al-Jazeera's logo in red with a bloody hand scratching at it. A bullet can kill a man, the poster says, but a lying camera can kill a nation.
Kelly McEvers NPR

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 6:45 am

The past two weeks in Egypt have been a real test for the TV network Al-Jazeera. Accusations that the network is biased toward the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi have resulted in arrests, threats and resignations.

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