Morning Edition on IPR News and News/Studio One

Steve Inskeep, Renée Montagne, Clay Masters

Weekdays at 5 a.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

For more than two decades, NPR's "Morning Edition" has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 13 million listeners, "Morning Edition" draws public radio's largest audience.

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Animals
6:34 am
Wed November 20, 2013

National Zoo Creates 'Name The Panda' Contest

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. We've brought our staff into the studio to respond to this sappy story about the baby panda at the National Zoo. The zoo in Washington is holding an online contest to name the panda. The name will be bestowed December 1st when the cub is 100 days old. Meanwhile, we can report the kid went for a walk. Colleagues were told she crawled out of the den all by herself, though she then got tired and went to sleep in the doorway.

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Aw.

Author Interviews
3:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Gov. Scott Walker Recounts First-Term Battles In New Book

Gov. Scott Walker speaks during a rally for South Carolina Republican Gov. Nikki Haley on Aug. 26 in Greenville, S.C.
Richard Shiro AP

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 3:54 pm

In his new book released this week, Unintimidated: A Governor's Story and a Nation's Challenge, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker reflects on the political firestorm he survived at home in 2012 — and diagnoses what went wrong for the national party.

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Around the Nation
3:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Early Warnings Saved Lives In Weekend Storms

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:34 am

The death toll from Sunday's tornado outbreak across the Midwest stands at eight. Many of those who witnessed the devastation say they're shocked that number isn't higher. Early warnings delivered by text message may have helped limit the casualties.

Politics
3:44 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Obama Concedes Botched Insurance Website Rollout Cost Time

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:34 am

The Obama administration is asking for people who've been turned off by the government's problem-plagued insurance website to come back. Officials say the website is working better now, though it's still far from fixed.

All Tech Considered
2:23 am
Wed November 20, 2013

Profit, Not Just Principle, Has Tech Firms Concerned With NSA

Google and five other companies sent a letter last month to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee supporting legislation to reform NSA surveillance programs.
Marcio Jose Sanchez AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 11:51 am

Along with the privacy advocates and the national security establishment, there is another set of players with strong views on NSA surveillance programs: U.S. tech companies.

Google and five other companies weighed in on the surveillance debate last month, sending a letter to members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, supporting legislation to reform National Security Agency surveillance programs.

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Around the Nation
2:18 am
Wed November 20, 2013

The Art Of Letter-Writing Isn't Lost On These Scribblers

Do you write letters anymore? A few determined people are doing their best to keep them arriving in U.S. mailboxes.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 10:00 am

When was the last time you wrote a letter?

If the answer is "not recently," then you can count yourself among the millions of Americans who just don't write letters anymore. The post office says the average American home receives only one personal letter about every two months.

But there are a few determined people who are doing their best to wreck that average.

"It's becoming a lost art," says Deb Bruzewski.

Every day she curls up on her plaid couch in her home in Auburn, Mich., to write a few of her 60 letters for the week.

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Africa
2:16 am
Wed November 20, 2013

In Nigeria's Bloody Fight, Who's Gaining The Upper Hand?

Men walk amid rubble after Boko Haram militants raided the town of Benisheik in northeast Nigeria, on Sept. 19. The Islamist group has been waging an insurgency in northern and central Nigeria for the past four years and was recently placed on the U.S. list of terrorist groups.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 9:51 am

For four years, the Islamist militants of Boko Haram have been waging a deadly campaign in northern and central Nigeria, killing thousands of people. In response, the Nigerian military is cracking down on the group, and the United States last week designated Boko Haram a terrorist organization.

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The Two-Way
1:47 am
Wed November 20, 2013

First Satellite Developed By High Schoolers Sent Into Space

NASA's PhoneSat, a 4-by-4-inch CubeSat satellite, will use an Android smartphone as its motherboard. It was among the 29 satellites launched Tuesday from Wallops Island, Va. Another miniature satellite, developed by high school students, also was on board.
Dominic Hart AP

Originally published on Thu December 12, 2013 11:51 am

The first satellite ever developed by high school students to make it to space is believed to be orbiting Earth after getting a ride aboard a U.S. military rocket Tuesday night from Wallops Island, Va.

Fittingly, perhaps, you can send it a text message.

The satellite, using a voice synthesizer, is built to transform that text into an audio message that can be heard over certain radio frequencies around the globe, and in different languages.

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Around the Nation
6:12 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Word Of The Year: Selfie

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne announcing the word of the year: Selfie. The Smartphone self-portrait. The Oxford Dictionary says it perfectly captures 2013. Selfies lit up social media and dirty ones derailed political careers. Teens even took one with the Pope. The word's come a long way since popping up on an Australian message board a decade ago. It beat out binge watch, meaning marathon TV watching, and twerk. You can look that one up. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:05 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Brooklyn Writer Live-Tweets Couple's Breakup

Brooklyn writer Kyle Ayers says he was on his apartment rooftop when he witnessed a breakup. So he decided to tweet what the man and woman were saying.

Middle East
5:15 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Iranian Cultural Attache Killed In Beirut Blasts

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 8:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two car bombs exploded in Beirut, Lebanon today. They exploded near the embassy of Iran in that city. The roughly two dozens dead include Iran's cultural attaché, we're told. The bombings draw attention for their violence, for their apparent target, Iran, and for the location. Lebanon is next door to Syria where Iran is deeply involved in a civil war supporting the government of President Bashar al Assad.

Let's go next to the New York Times Beirut bureau chief Anne Barnard. She's on the line from there. Hi, Anne.

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Research News
3:23 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Study: Commuting Adversely Affects Political Engagement

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 11:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Okay. We all know about the partisan divide in this country - Democrats, Republicans - but there's another political divide. Part of the country is very engaged in the political process and part is not.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Older Americans, richer Americans and better educated Americans are more likely to be politically engaged. Now researchers have found one more factor that seems to shape political engagement, the length of your commute. It comes to our attention as MORNING EDITION focuses on commuting.

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Business
3:23 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Bitcoin Hits Record High After Senate Panel Told It's Legal

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:15 am

The cyber-currency was at the center of a Senate panel hearing Monday. Senators are looking into the way Bitcoin was used by the illegal drug marketplace that called itself Silk Road. But even with the scrutiny, Bitcoin investors drove the virtual currency to record highs.

Law
3:23 am
Tue November 19, 2013

How Court's Bus Ruling Sealed Differences In Detroit Schools

In 1973, Ray Litt and a group of Detroiters went to court in an attempt to force the state to desegregate the city's schools.
NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 12:46 pm

It was 40 years ago today that the Supreme Court accepted what became a landmark case about school desegregation. The case was controversial because it involved busing student between a largely African-American city — Detroit — and its white suburban areas. The ruling helped cement differences between urban schools and suburban neighborhoods.

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Code Switch
2:07 am
Tue November 19, 2013

A New Life For An Old Slave Jail

Formerly known as the Alexandria Slave Pen, this ashen gray row house in Alexandria, Va., once housed one of the country's largest slave-dealing firms.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:31 pm

President Abraham Lincoln stood on a battlefield in Gettysburg, Pa., 150 years ago and declared "a new birth of freedom" for the nation.

That same year, an African-American man named Lewis Henry Bailey experienced his own rebirth. At age 21, Bailey was freed from slavery in Texas. His journey began in Virginia, where he was sold as a child in a slave jail.

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U.S. Commutes: The Way We Get To Work
2:06 am
Tue November 19, 2013

'You Just Get Used To It': An LA Commuter's Diary

Neville Amaria's commute to work used to take up to 1.5 hours each way. He carpooled with colleagues including Stefanie McNally, Cristina Cooper and Bryan Kim. The gang passed the time by sleeping and snapping photos of unlucky commuters.
Courtesy of Cristina Cooper

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 7:50 am

For two years, Neville Amaria carpooled to his office in Los Angeles. That puts him in the same category as about 10 percent of American workers, who drive or ride to work in a car with two or more passengers.

Even still, Amaria's carpool stood out for its extremes. His mega-commute lasted two to three hours, round trip. And he did it with up to four co-workers squeezed into the car with him — most carpoolers only ride with one other passenger.

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U.S.
2:05 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Little-Known Immigration Mandate Keeps Detention Beds Full

The federal immigration detention center in Florence, Ariz., is one of about 250 such facilities around the country. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is required to house 34,000 immigration detainees per day, nationwide.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 4:04 pm

Imagine your city council telling the police department how many people it had to keep in jail each night.

That's effectively what Congress has told U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement with a policy known as the "detention bed mandate." The mandate calls for filling 34,000 beds in some 250 facilities across the country, per day, with immigrant detainees.

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Around the Nation
2:04 am
Tue November 19, 2013

After Floods, Some Colo. Rivers Aren't Where They Used To Be

Excavators work to restore the original channel of Left Hand Creek. The creek's diversion structures sit clogged with mud, debris and stagnant water.
Jim Hill KUNC

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:34 am

In Colorado, farmers are scrambling to recover from September's historic floods — floods that decimated miles of roadways, cut off entire towns and sent rivers and creeks into areas they'd never been before.

Like Tim Foster's immaculate front yard.

"It was beautiful," he says. "I had four large blue spruces. We had hundred-year-old cottonwoods all along the bank. We had our irrigation and our pumps. It was just gorgeous."

Read more
Business
5:09 am
Mon November 18, 2013

More LED Lights Used In Holiday Displays

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. In the movie "Christmas Vacation" Chevy Chase's character attaches thousands of Christmas lights to his roof with a staple gun. When the lights go on, utilities have to boost their power to avoid a blackout. That would not happen today. Stores are selling more LED lights this year, which use less energy.

Around the Nation
5:09 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Yarn Bombers Strike Statues In Portland, Ore.

It takes a real craft-oriented city to experience yarn bombing. The latest soft hit: statues decked out in holiday knitwear. Two dolphin statues now sport red and green sweaters. A deer statue wears a pompom cap and legwarmers.

Middle East
3:15 am
Mon November 18, 2013

After Stalemate, Regime Troops Gain Against Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:09 am

The Syrian army has been gaining significant ground against the rebels around the capital and in the north city of Aleppo. Analysts say the regime has better allies, superior fire-power and in this sectarian battle, has finally integrated Shiite forces from Hezbollah into a formidable force that is effective against disunited rebels.

Business
3:00 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Boeing's 777x Wins Multiple Orders At Dubai Airshow

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Dubai Air Show kicked off this weekend, a chance with people in the aviation industry to see and be seen, and show off technology and usually to announce a lot of the sales. In the first three hours of the show, more than $150 billion in airplane orders were announced. And the biggest beneficiary was Boeing. The Seattle-based company said it had orders for more than 350 of its new passenger jets. There's still a question of where those aircraft will be built. NPR's Nathan Rott reports.

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Law
3:00 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Hundreds Arrested In Massive Child Pornography Ring

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 5:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We start this story with a warning. Some people may find the subject unsettling. People with kids in the room may wish to skip the next six minutes. Years ago, police in Toronto, Canada began tracking a suspect in their city. With the help of police in other nations, they quietly began linking him to a global network of people trafficking in child pornography.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Author Interviews
2:08 am
Mon November 18, 2013

'McSweeney's': Quirky Quarterly To Publishing Powerhouse

Dave Eggers is the author of What is the What, Zeitoun and, most recently, The Circle.
Tina Fineberg AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 1:58 pm

In the late 90s, before Dave Eggers wrote a bestselling memoir (A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius), before he penned the screenplay for Where the Wild Things Are, before any of his novels, he was a young guy sitting in his kitchen tearing open envelopes filled with literary submissions.

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Shots - Health News
2:07 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Gut Bacteria Might Guide The Workings Of Our Minds

Illustration by Benjamin Arthur for NPR

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 11:58 am

Could the microbes that inhabit our guts help explain that old idea of "gut feelings?" There's growing evidence that gut bacteria really might influence our minds.

"I'm always by profession a skeptic," says Dr. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine and psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles. "But I do believe that our gut microbes affect what goes on in our brains."

Read more
The Two-Way
9:46 am
Sun November 17, 2013

Doris Lessing, Nobel Prize-Winning Author, Dies

British author Doris Lessing (L) shows her prize insignia of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature at the Wallace Collection in London in 2008.
Shaun Curry AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 9:43 am

Doris Lessing, the Nobel Prize-winning author, died Sunday morning according her publisher, Harper Collins.

Lessing, who produced 55 works, including poetry, operas and short stories, was 94 years old.

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Asia
7:19 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Ikea's Typhoon Aid Overshadows China's Aid To Philippines

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is: missed opportunity.

The typhoon in the Philippines prompted the U.S. to send money, food and an aircraft carrier, all of which may deepen relations with that U.S. Ally. China has tense relation with the Philippines but did not try the same gambit.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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Asia
7:12 am
Fri November 15, 2013

China Expected To Loosen One-Child Policy

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:49 am

A state-run news service says the government will make a big change to the policy designed to restrain population growth. That policy has also led to a relative shortfall of young people and especially of girls.

Animals
6:50 am
Fri November 15, 2013

Researchers Figure Out Found Clam Was 507 Years Old

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The next time you dip into a bowl of clam chowder, consider this. You might be consuming a clam that has lived through a lot of history. We know this because a mollusk named Ming was 507 years old when it was dredged up in the ocean off Iceland a few years ago. When they first counted the rings on the shell of this common clam, scientists at Bangor University in Wales named it Ming in honor of the Chinese dynasty it was born into. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
6:23 am
Fri November 15, 2013

New Jersey Utility Plans To Keep Super Bowl Power Flowing

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 9:49 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

This season's Super Bowl requires the same electricity flow as 12,000 homes. The utility for New Jersey, which is hosting the game, wants to keep that power flowing. The nightmare would be a repeat of last season's 34-minute blackout in New Orleans. So the company installed three power lines, any one of which could run the event. Hopefully that works since the last power failure was blamed on a broken device installed to prevent power failures.

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