Here and Now

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

The emphasis on standardized testing in schools across the country has many educators worried that some students aren’t learning the basics of reading and writing. That’s leading some districts to try creative methods to increase literacy, particularly for young students in low-income and minority neighborhoods.

Last year, countries around the world installed more renewable energy capacity than ever before. Investments in solar, wind and hydropower were more than twice as high as the amount spent on developing new fossil fuel sources.

China accounted for more than one third of the $286 billion spent on renewable energy development in 2015, according to a new report by REN21, a renewable energy think tank based at the United Nations Environment Program in Paris.

After weeks of scrutiny, the Transportation Security Administration took steps to limit delays at the nation’s airports over Memorial Day weekend. And while many holiday travelers were pleasantly surprised by the manageable wait times, staffing and budget problems at the TSA all but guarantee long lines will return.

Last night, the Golden State Warriors beat the Oklahoma City Thunder, securing a spot in the NBA finals that begin on Thursday. As usual, TV crews and photographers had their lenses trained on every basket in the 96-88 game, but broadcasters also drew on a relatively new piece of technology to help document the action.

Through a partnership with Intel, the NBA has been using 3D video to create 360-degree replays of slam dunks and other show-stopping plays. It’s the NBA version of the red carpet Glam Cam.

When a big dairy or meatpacking company comes into a Midwest city to build a factory, it doesn’t just bring in new jobs and industry. Farmers change what they grow, expand their herds, and buy new land. That can literally change the surrounding landscape.

Luke Runyon of Here & Now contributor Harvest Public Media reports on the expansion of a Leprino’s factory in Northern Colorado.

President Barack Obama marked this Memorial Day by placing a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. People are visiting the graves of their loved ones killed in action at cemeteries across the country today.

Here & Now’s Alex Ashlock went to the Massachusetts National Cemetery on Cape Cod last week, and has this report.

If you’ve been out on the roads this holiday weekend, you might notice that it’s getting harder and harder to find a tollbooth with a human being actually taking tolls. Toll plazas all over the country are going automatic. But just at the top of the Florida Keys, there’s a tollbooth with people inside.

Jenny Luna was with the Miami Herald when she reported this story for Here & Now contributor WLRN in Miami.

In the 1930s, a Japanese-American teacher in Hawaii came up with an ambitious plan: take kids who had just learned to swim in a re-purposed sugar cane ditch and train them to compete on an international level.

Julie Checkoway tells the story in “The Three Year Swim Club: The Untold Story of Maui’s Sugar Ditch Kids and Their Quest for Olympic Glory.” Here & Now revisits Meghna Chakrabarti’s conversation with the author from last October.

Netflix announced earlier this year that it’s planning to pour $6 billion into original programming in 2016.

As a new Adam Sandler and David Spade original film premieres tonight, NPR’s Eric Deggans tells Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti that the company’s definition of success is different for each project.

Charisma is a crucial component of a politician’s appeal to voters. But there’s more than one way to inspire confidence, or even adoration, among the audience of a political speech.

Voice scientist Rosario Signorello has studied how the current presidential candidates change their pitch and volume during public appearances. This week he presented that research at the Spring 2016 meeting of the Acoustical Society of America in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Facebook and Microsoft announced Thursday that they will work together on a project to build a new 4,000 mile-long cable under the Atlantic. It’s one of many high-capacity cables being built by tech companies, and shows an increasing involvement from Silicon Valley in the internet’s infrastructure.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti hears more about the project from Michael Regan of Bloomberg Gadfly.

A traditional Native American healing ceremony is performed to promote a sense of wellness and to connect participants in mind, body and spirit.

The ceremonies can include prayer, chants and sacred objects and are often accompanied by music played on traditional instruments. But one healing ceremony in Phoenix has been reimagined for the digital age.

Jimmy Jenkins from Here & Now contributor KJZZ reports.

If your child is taking medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), their doctor may soon offer a new option: fruit-flavored chewables.

The new drug, Adzenys XR-ODT, got FDA approval in January, and went on the market last week. But some psychiatrists are concerned that making amphetamines in a candy-like form will make people more likely to abuse them, and also contribute to what some see as a trend of overmedicating children.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with Meghana Keshavan, biotech correspondent at STAT.

The Senate voted yesterday to block a new rule issued by the Obama Administration that requires brokers to act in the best interest of their clients when it comes to retirement accounts.

Before the rule change, they were required to make sure that investments were “suitable,” for clients, which was a lower standard. Republicans have supported blocking the rule, while President Obama has promised to veto the Senate bill so that the rule stands.

Here & Now’s Robin Young discusses the situation with CNN’s Maggie Lake.

Celebrating The Class Of 2016: Peace Odiase

May 25, 2016

This week, Here & Now has been speaking with 2016 college graduates about the biggest challenges they faced in school, and where they plan to go next.

Today, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Peace Odiase, one of two valedictorians at Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee.

Long car commutes not only cost drivers time, it may also cost them good health. Extended commutes in heavy traffic are tied to stress, less time to exercise, and more exposure to air pollution. As Carey Goldberg of Here & Now contributor WBUR reports, researchers say those three factors can lead to a higher risk for cardiovascular problems.

The Fast Talking Dean Of Hamilton College

May 23, 2016

At Hamilton College in Clinton, NY, Dean of Faculty Pat Reynolds holds the record for the fastest reading of graduates’ names at the college’s commencement ceremony. Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks to Reynolds about this year’s performance and the difficulties involved in providing a quick, dignified, and accurate reading of the names.

What are the hopes and expectations of this year’s college graduates? This week, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson will speak with several graduating seniors. First up: Konje Machini, who was chosen to be one of the commencement speakers at the University of Chicago’s graduation in June.

A new assessment shows that eighth grade girls are more proficient in technology and engineering literacy tests than boys. The National Assessment of Educational Progress was administered in 2014 to more than 21,000 students in 800 public and private schools across the United States. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Peggy Carr, acting commissioner of The National Center for Education Statistics about the surprise results of the assessment.

KCRW DJ Anne Litt brings us new music, including one piece from the Haitian-Canadian electronic musician Kaytranada and a song off a new Grateful Dead tribute album. Litt tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson what caught her ear about this music.

Songs In The Segment

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As American consumers swipe and scan their credit cards more often, card debt is climbing back towards its pre-recession peak of $1.02 trillion. U.S. credit card balances are headed for $1 trillion this year, a sign perhaps that the economic recovery has soothed consumers’ concerns about carrying debt.

The Latest On The Missing EgyptAir Plane

May 19, 2016

The latest on the missing EgyptAir flight MS 804 that disappeared early this morning. NPR national security editor Phil Ewing tells Here & Now’s Robin Young that the U.S. could play a role in the investigation because the jet engines were made in the U.S.

Seasonal Ingredients And How To Use Them

May 19, 2016

As local produce makes its way into stores and farmers markets, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst wants to know: What’s in season?  She brings us ingredients and recipes from Arizona, Illinois, Washington, and her home state of Maine.

See more recipes and cooking segments with Kathy Gunst

The disappearance of EgyptAir flight MS 804 en route from Paris to Cairo with 66 people on board comes after a number of deadly incidents for the airline. On March 29, an Egypt Air flight was hijacked by a passenger who said he was wearing an explosives belt, which turned out to be a fake. There was also an EgyptAir crash in 1999 during a flight from New York to Cairo that killed all 217 people on board, which may have deliberately been caused by its pilots, and another accident in 2002 involving an EgyptAir flight near Tunis that killed 14 passengers out of 62 on board.

Charter schools throughout the country are increasingly competing with public schools for students. In Washington DC, nearly half of all students attend charter schools, some switching to them between grades. This can wreak havoc on the stability of enrollment from one grade to the next. Matthew Schwartz from Here & Now contributor WAMU visited Brent Elementary, a public school that has seen a steep decline in enrollment.

By the time alto-saxophonist, singer and composer Grace Kelly was 15, she’d performed with the Boston Pops and released several albums. Now 23, Kelly has released her tenth album: “Trying to Figure it Out,” she’s performed hundreds of concerts around the world, and she’s a regular member of Jon Batiste’s “Stay Human,” the house band for “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.”

Her music has also been featured on the Amazon TV series “Bosch,” on which Kelly made an appearance. Here & Now’s Robin Young catches up with Grace Kelly.

Apple CEO Tim Cook visited a Hindu temple in Mumbai before dawn Wednesday. Coming on the heels of a trip to China that resulted in a major investment in the Chinese company Didi Chuxing, Cook’s India itinerary is likely to include some significant business meetings.

The Oregon Trail Game’s Minnesota Roots

May 17, 2016

The Oregon Trail game has sold over 65 million copies worldwide and it is considered to be the most widely distributed educational game ever. But it was created in Minnesota by three aspiring teachers. Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of them, Paul Dillenberger, about why he and his friends created the game and what its popularity has meant for them. He also stops by the end of the Oregon Trail in Oregon City and talks with school children on a field trip about the game.

Why It's 'Transgender' Not 'Transgendered'

May 17, 2016

The word “transgender” has only recently come into widespread usage, largely as a result of the firestorm over state laws restricting which bathrooms transgender people should use. Assistant professor K.J. Rawson explains the word’s history, and tells Here & Now’s Robin Young why the proper use is “transgender,” not “transgendered” — because “transgender” is something you are, not something you do.

Why Are Oil Prices Going Up?

May 17, 2016

Oil prices hit a six-month high yesterday and could reach $50 a barrel for the first time since November. For the past two years, the global demand for oil has been less than supply, but that may be changing. Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with Jason Bellini of The Wall Street Journal.

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