Here and Now

Monday through Thursday at 1 p.m. on IPR News and News/Studio One

 

Here! Now! In the moment! Paddling in the middle of a fast moving stream of news and information. Here & Now is Public Radio's daily news magazine, bringing you the news that breaks after "Morning Edition" and before "All Things Considered."

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Tribal Fishery Opposes Washington Coal Terminal

Tribal treaty fishing rights give Washington tribes the opportunity to weigh in on, and even block, projects that could impact their fishing grounds.(Ashley Ahearn/KUOW Photo)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:51 am

About a quarter of all the coal the U.S. exports goes to Asian markets. To meet the demand, there are plans to build what would be the largest coal terminal in North America at a place called Cheery Point in the far northwestern corner of Washington state.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

The Music Of Liberation: Steven Van Zandt And Danny Schechter On 'Sun City'

Steven Van Zandt and Danny Schechter (Jon Kalish)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:53 am

In the early 1980s, Nelson Mandela’s name was virtually unknown in the United States. In fact, it was Steve Biko, who died in police custody in South Africa in 1977, who first put the struggles of black South Africans into public consciousness in the U.S.

Peter Gabriel’s song “Biko” was written in 1980, the same year the United Nations established a cultural boycott of the country, and was among the first of the songs that catapulted the plight of apartheid onto the musical airwaves.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Echoes Of The Madoff Scandal On 5 Year Anniversary

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:53 am

It’s been five years since the Madoff scandal broke — the largest Ponzi scheme in history that defrauded investors of over $17.5 billion dollars.

Earlier this week, Frank DiPascali, Bernie Madoff’s former finance chief testified against five former coworkers, detailing how they helped carry out the fraud.

In the meantime, Madoff will spend the rest of his life at a federal prison in North Carolina. He recently granted an interview to The Wall Street Journal.

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NPR Story
3:14 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Is Chipotle The New Model For Fast Food?

A Chipotle restaurant is pictured in Glenview, Illinois, in December 2005. (Tim Boyle/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:53 am

With nearly 200 new restaurants slated to open in 2014 and the fastest-rising stock in the fast food industry, is Chipotle the new model for fast food?

Industry analyst David Tarantino says Chipotle is changing fast food the way Starbucks changed coffee shops and Home Depot changed home improvement.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Soprano Dawn Upshaw And Composer Maria Schneider Make Grammy-Nominated Music Together

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:55 am

Soprano Dawn Upshaw has been a longtime fan of composer Maria Schneider’s work, so Upshaw approached the composer and suggested a collaboration.

The result is the album “Winter Morning Walks,” which has been nominated for three Grammy awards, including Best Contemporary Classical Composition and Best Classical Vocal Solo.

We revisit our March conversation with Schneider and Upshaw.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

The Close Harmony Of Lily And Madeleine

(lilandmad.com)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:55 am

Each week NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson brings us a new song. Today, he introduces us to the music of Lily & Madeleine with their song “Devil We Know.”

“Lily and Madeleine capture what is sometimes called ‘blood harmony,’ where siblings can make their voices interlock in ways that sound incredibly natural,” Thompson tells Here & Now’s Robin Young.

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NPR Story
3:06 pm
Mon December 9, 2013

Newtown Decides Against Shooting Anniversary Event

Photos of Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre victims sit at a small memorial near the school on January 14, 2013, in Newtown, Connecticut. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:55 am

Residents of Newtown, Conn., have decided against a public commemoration to mark the first anniversary this coming Saturday of the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, which left 20 first graders and six educators dead.

Instead, the town is endorsing a “year of service” and is asking residents to put a candle in their window on Dec. 14, the day of the shooting, to show their commitment to the idea of service to each other.

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NPR Story
3:29 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Fukushima Inspectors Say Beginning Of Clean-Up Going Well So Far

In this photo released Nov. 27, 2013, by International Atomic Energy Agency, a team of IAEA experts check out water storage tanks at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Japan. (Greg Webb/IAEA)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are praising Japan for making progress to stabilize the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant, which was crippled by an earthquake and tsunami nearly three years ago.

This week, the IAEA inspectors wrapped up a 10-day inspection of the plant, where the decommissioning process started a few weeks ago.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson gets the latest from BBC Tokyo correspondent Rupert Wingfield-Hayes.

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NPR Story
3:29 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Budget Deal May Be On The Horizon

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Congressional budget committee leaders are working to pull together a budget deal by the end of next week. Republic Congressman Paul Ryan and Democratic Senator Patty Murray are reportedly discussing how to increase revenue without raising taxes.

A main provision of the agreement would be a partial easing of the next two spending sequesters. It was only in October that a deadlock over federal spending led to the first government shutdown in 17 years.

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NPR Story
3:29 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

In Prison With Nelson Mandela

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 9:58 am

Anti-apartheid activist Ahmed Kathrada spent almost 27 years in prison with Nelson Mandela on Robben Island. Earlier this year, he gave President and Michelle Obama a tour of his former prison.

Here & Now’s Robin Young spoke to Kathrada in July. Today we present an excerpt of that conversation.

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NPR Story
3:16 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

A Cappella Fans Cheer Return Of 'The Sing-Off'

The panel of judges on NBC's "The Sing-Off," an a cappella competition. (NBC)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

On Monday, NBC’s a cappella competition “The Sing-Off” returns for a fourth season on Monday, Dec. 9.

Ten teams (list below) will compete for a recording contract and a $100,000 prize.

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NPR Story
3:16 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Illinois Pension Debate Expected To Move To Courts

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

Update 3:20 p.m.: Illinois Governor Pat Quinn has signed the pension reform bill.

Now that lawmakers have passed an overhaul of Illinois’s government worker pension systems, the fight is expected to move to the courts.

Provisions of the overhaul include raising the retirement age for many state workers and cutting some benefits. The overhaul is estimated to save the state $160 billion over 30 years.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn is expected to sign the bill by the end of the week.

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NPR Story
3:16 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

China Mobile And Apple Sign iPhone Deal

China Mobile, the world's largest mobile carrier, will soon provide iPhone service on its network. (William Hook/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:00 am

The world’s largest mobile carrier, China Mobile, will soon offer iPhones on its network.

The deal gives Apple access to more than 700 million subscribers. That’s seven times the size of Verizon Wireless.

Derek Thompson, business editor for The Atlantic, joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss the implications of the deal.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Miami Gears Up For Art Basel

Street artist Komik in front of his piece. (Julia Duba/WLRN)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:03 am

Every year, tens of thousands of people attend the international art show in Miami Beach called Art Basel. There are arts galleries, live music performances and lots of live street exhibitions on the street.

Art Basel, which runs from Dec. 5 to 8, also comes to Miami’s up-and-coming neighborhood, Wynwood. With its warehouses-turned-art galleries, Wynwood is a prime location for street art.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

NPR's Planet Money Follows The Life Of A T-Shirt

Lisa, 30, is one of many people who bought the shirt and posted a photo of herself wearing it on Instagram.

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:03 am

If you’ve been listening to NPR this week, you’ve probably heard about something called the t-shirt project.

Months ago, Planet Money had the idea to design a t-shirt and follow it around the world as it was manufactured.

The project took the Planet Money team around the globe: from factories in Bangladesh and Colombia, to cotton farms and container ships.

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NPR Story
3:41 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

New Bombs Pose New Threat

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

With top U.S. lawmakers warning of new terrorism threats, intelligence officials in the U.K. say there remains an enduring threat from bombs made by terrorists in Yemen.

The threat comes from the type of bomb that failed to explode on a plane over Detroit in 2009 — the so-called underwear bomber.

The BBC’s security correspondent Frank Gardner reports.

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Study: 'Uptalk' Spreads From Valley Girls To Young Men

Upspeak was on display in the 1995 movie "Clueless" about Beverly Hills teenagers. (Paramount Pictures)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

When there is an upward inflection at the end of a sentence, as if it were a question, that’s called uptalk or upspeak. It’s often referred to as talking like a “valley girls.”

But a new study presented at the Acoustical Society of America by researcher Amanda Ritchart has found that uptalk in Southern California has spread to young men.

Carey Goldberg, co-host of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog, joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young to talk about uptalk?

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Vietnam Vet, 71, Working As Contractor In Afghanistan

Jeff Traylor, a 71-year-old contractor in Afghanistan (center), flanked by two servicemen. (Jeff Traylor)

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

You’ve not doubt heard the stories about people working past retirement age. Jeff Traylor has taken that to a new level.

He’s 71 years old, a Vietnam veteran, and he’s working with the Air Force as a contractor in Afghanistan. He’s doing it because he needed the job.

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NPR Story
3:37 pm
Wed December 4, 2013

Listeners Share Their Health Exchange Experiences

Originally published on Tue December 17, 2013 10:04 am

Fourteen states and Washington D.C. have their own health insurance exchanges. Some of the state websites continue to have technical glitches, as does the federal HealthCare.gov website. We asked our listeners how easy it was for them to sign up.

David Haseltine of Portland, Oregon, is 27-years-old. He had some problems signing up on the state health exchange website and is now waiting to hear if he’s approved for Medicaid.

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NPR Story
3:00 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Photographer Hopes To Put Face On Syrian Statistics

A one-year old Syrian refugee in his bed and play pen in Tripoli, Lebanon. His family fled Syria just after he was born. He spends most of his time in this box which is his bed, play pen, refuge. This crate resides on the grounds of an active slaughter house where his family now lives. (Elena Dorfman)

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:19 pm

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NPR Story
2:50 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Did Silicon Valley Help The NSA Spy?

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:19 pm

Georgetown University professor Abraham Newman argues that business practices at the big technology companies have helped the National Security Agency gather consumers’ personal data in the U.S. and abroad.

Technology companies have reacted sharply to revelations of N.S.A. spying on their customers’ data. Google said, “We are outraged at the lengths to which the government seems to have gone to intercept data from our private fiber networks, and it underscores the need for urgent reform.”

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NPR Story
2:21 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

'Giving Tuesday' Follows Record-Breaking Cyber Monday

(givingtuesday.org)

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:19 pm

Cyber Monday, the Super Bowl of online sales, broke all records this year, with sales up 19 percent over last year.

Mobile traffic accounted for 13 percent of total site visits, and sales are projected to reach $2 billion for desktop online sales, according to comScore.

But the bonanza isn’t over. Today is “Giving Tuesday.” The movement to create a national day of giving started last year, raising $10 million dollars for more than 2,500 charities nationwide.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Raising Children In Two Faiths

One of the state Christmas trees and the National Menorah near the White House are pictured in in 2009. (Kevin H./Flickr)

Nearly half of the marriages in the U.S. over the last decade have been between people of different faiths, and many of those families are raising children fully in both parents’ religious traditions.

Susan Katz Miller talked to Here & Now’s Robin Young about the rise of interfaith families. She herself is the great-granddaughter of a rabbi, and married to the great-grandson of an Episcopal bishop. They are raising their children fully in both faiths, Jewish and Episcopal Christian.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Auburn-Alabama: The Greatest Play In College Football History?

College football fans on Saturday witnessed what some are calling the greatest play in college football history, at the Iron Bowl game between the Auburn Tigers and the Alabama Crimson Tide.

Auburn’s Chris Davis caught the missed Alabama field goal and ran over 100 yards for the touchdown that gave Auburn the win. Auburn now moves onto SEC Championship.

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

What Happens To Failed Shopping Malls?

Euclid Square Mall in Northeast Ohio is now the site of 24 Christian congregations. (David C. Barnett/WCPN)

Successful malls can be some of the most bustling places in America: enclosed commercial districts that are “people magnets,” with packed parking lots and a variety of popular shops, department stores and restaurants.

But over the years, online shopping and a roller coaster economy have turned many malls into ghost towns.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, David C. Barnett of WCPN examines the afterlife of some malls in Northeast Ohio.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

'Tis The Season For New Cookbooks

(Hideya Hamano/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 1:55 pm

Cookbooks abound this time of year, just in time for holiday feasting.

Among the stacks on NPR food and health correspondent Allison Aubrey‘s desk are cookbooks for slow cooking, gluten-free baked goods and practical books for fresh and simple foods.

She shares some of the best ones with Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Independent Retailers Look To 'Small Business Saturday'

Lizzibeth in Milwaukee is one of many small businesses hoping to capitalize on the holiday season. (LaToya Dennis/WUWM)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:20 pm

Small, locally-owned retailers are also trying to cash in the holiday shopping rush with Small Business Saturday tomorrow.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, LaToya Dennis of WUWM in Milwaukee reports that small players can face a challenge that big box stores don’t have to worry about: marketing.

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NPR Story
2:16 pm
Fri November 29, 2013

Top Amazon Reviewers Get Big Perks

Michael Erb gets thousands of dollars in free merchandise for being a top reviewer on Amazon. (Michael E Mobile Sound/Facebook)

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 3:20 pm

Whether or not you read them, the customer reviews on retailers’ websites have enormous value, mostly for the company.

The more a product is reviewed, the more likely it is that people will buy that product and the more money companies such as Amazon make.

So the benefits of online reviews are obvious for retailers, but what’s in it for the most prolific reviewers? For Amazon’s top reviewers, the benefits are tangible.

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Thanksgiving Tradition: Snow Geese Migration In Vermont

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 2:34 pm

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NPR Story
1:38 pm
Thu November 28, 2013

Holiday Manners: Making The Most Of Being Polite

After your big holiday meal, you may ask, "Is it appropriate to ask my guests to help with the dishes?" We have answers from the Emily Post Institute. (Jenica/Flickr)

Originally published on Thu November 28, 2013 2:34 pm

It’s the holidays. You and your loved ones and friends have just enjoyed a beautiful meal. Now it’s time for the daunting pile of dirty dishes. Is it appropriate to ask your dinner guests to help with the dishes?

Cousins Daniel Post Senning and Lizzie Post, who are descendants of Emily Post — the foremost manners and etiquette expert to the rich and rude from the 1920s on — join Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to share advice to help us navigate the holidays.

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